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Rich1028 said:
whats the difference in 155 grain,165 grain,180 grain?

this is for my glock 23 40 s&w

the lower grain is lower in price.

http://www.bulkammo.com/handgun/bulk-.40-s-w-ammo?quantity=17
Short answer: "grain" is the weight of the bullet. A grain is a small unit of measure.

In essence, given the same caliber, different grains matched with different loads create different pressures resulting in different flights.

For target/practice shooting at average distances (7-20 ft ish) it won't make a significant difference. For match shooting, serious competitors like to "mix their own recipes."

I'm not familiar with .40 cal but average factory grain for .45 is 230gr. 185gr .45 is very light IMO. I prefer the heavier bullet.
 

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Royal hit it on the head! I personally like a heaver bullet my self do in .40 for carry or defense I use 180 grain. In 9mm I like 124.

All personal preference.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
we have both the 165 grain,and the 180 grain and we shoot them back to back at the range and did not notice any differance.
and we are new to this,so thats prolly why.


ok i get it!!
personal defense use 180 grain.
for target,practice use either...
thanks !
 

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ok i get it!!
personal defense use 180 grain.
for target,practice use either...
thanks ![/QUOTE]

Well that's up to you! 165 is fine also just depends on what you fell comfortable with. The 180 is going to travel slower but be heavier and the 165 fly faster being lighter..

Check out tntoutdoors YouTube channel it will really help on what you want for a defensive round, he's not bias just performs the test and shows the results
 

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If you are loading to the same power factor. The different weight bullets will give you a different felling in preserved recoil. I personally like heavier bullets 180gr in 40 and 147gr in 9mm. I fell the recoil is more of a push compared to a snap like I get with lighter bullets. I fell I can get back on target faster with the push compared to the snap. Get some of each load them up and see what you like.
 

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I think its safe to say everyone got it right. The grain is the weight, just make sure you note, the higher the grain-the higher the weight of the bullet and most likely higher amount of powder. More powder is necessary when the bullet is heavier due to the larger mass needing to be moved. So a higher grain can be louder, and also have more recoil/kick than a lower grain
 

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I think its safe to say everyone got it right. The grain is the weight, just make sure you note, the higher the grain-the higher the weight of the bullet and most likely higher amount of powder. More powder is necessary when the bullet is heavier due to the larger mass needing to be moved. So a higher grain can be louder, and also have more recoil/kick than a lower grain
Nope, heavier the bullet equals less powder in the same caliber.
 

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we have both the 165 grain,and the 180 grain and we shoot them back to back at the range and did not notice any differance.
and we are new to this,so thats prolly why.


ok i get it!!
personal defense use 180 grain.
for target,practice use either...
thanks !
Personally, I only shoot 165gr in .40. The 180gr bullet (which was originally designed for the 10mm's longer case) doesn't leave much room in the case for the powder, so a slight overcharge can lead to overpressure and blow up. It's rare, and it's unlikely to happen in factory loaded ammo, but it only takes once and I prefer not to risk it. Ammo makers make mistakes too.

Whatever you decide on for defense, you should try to find a practice ammo that has a similar load, so that you have some consistency between them. For instance, if your defense load is 165gr at 1050 fps, then try to find a practice load that's 165gr at 1050fps or as close as possible.

Different bullet weights and different powder charges will have different points of impact on the target, and will have a different sound and recoil impulse. If you ever have to shoot in self defense, you want that gun to feel just like it does when you're on the range.

I think its safe to say everyone got it right. The grain is the weight, just make sure you note, the higher the grain-the higher the weight of the bullet and most likely higher amount of powder. More powder is necessary when the bullet is heavier due to the larger mass needing to be moved. So a higher grain can be louder, and also have more recoil/kick than a lower grain
Generally, this is incorrect. There's only so much room in a case and the larger bullet takes up more space, leading to a lower powder charge. That's one of the reasons that larger bullets tend to travel slower than their lighter counterparts. That's also why it can take a +P (which is higher pressure) to move a heavier bullet at the same speed as a lighter one.
 

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Ah I see, so the higher grain will have the same or less powder. Like throwing a light rock and a heavy rock. The light rock is going to go farther, but the heavier rock has more mass and hits harder
 

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ammo

I have a Gen 4 G23. I shoot HST 180 grainers for SD. The Speer golddot 165 gr or the Ranger T 165 grainers are good for SD as well. This is according to Mas Ayoob based on actual shootings. As far as target ammo, use the grains that are the same as your self defense load. SG ammo has lots of great stuff at good prices. WWW.sgammo.com.:D
 

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I never cared for the recoil impulse of the 40S&W with the 155-165gr bullet loads. Tried the 180 gr sub-sonic stuff in the last 40cal that I had(Beretta PX4 Storm) and it was a bit better but I still don't like it. Rather have my 45acp or a 9x19mm.
 

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I prefer 135 grain for defensive ammo and 165 for the range. The 135 is a much higher velocity, and much more muzzle energy. 180 grain ammo was designed for 10mm loads and is too heavy for .40.
 

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Two things in general:

The 40 S&W, though descending from the 10mm, was born and designed as a 180gr JHP loading for law enforcement and thus most pistols chambered in 40S&W were designed around the 180gr bullet. The 180gr loading works very well and is the weight chosen most often by main stream law enforcement.

Concerning real shooting lists, stats, one shot drops, street voodoo or what ever one calls it, I put no stock in it and neither do any of my "associates". Main stream law enforcement pays no attention to it as there are no valid stats being kept and no one is keeping valid stats. Each shooting has too many variables to quantify. Those that allege shooting stats often have hidden agendas. The science of terminal ballistics in relation to bullet performance is an entirely different realm. Bill
 

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Main stream law enforcement pays no attention to it as there are no valid stats being kept and no one is keeping valid stats. Each shooting has too many variables to quantify. Those that allege shooting stats often have hidden agendas. The science of terminal ballistics in relation to bullet performance is an entirely different realm. Bill
Your right about "too many variables to quantify", but the FBI seems to pay attention to it, some how they came up with their "protocols".
 
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