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Junior Member
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone.

I just got a G19 a few weeks ago and am very new to shooting. I have put around 500 rounds through my gun now, and I am very consistently doing some stuff and I'd like some feedback on it.

I start out great, hitting very close to the center of the target, and get off maybe 2 or 3 shots like that. Then, everything starts to drop down towards the lower left of the target, and I am doing this consistently.

I am working hard on my stance and how I am holding the gun, but I don't have lots of upper body strength, so I am shaky. I know it will come with time, but I am just curious if there is something particular that I might be doing so I am always grouping down to the lower left of the target. TIA!
 

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Load Bearing Wall
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4,095 Posts
Looks like your just staying aimed in too long at a stretch, not uncommon. Wrists & hands get tired, & you start pushing the trigger off to the left, presuming your right handed, that is. Try loading six in the mag to cut back on the weight of the gun, and take each shot individually, drop, relax your arm, & re-aim for the next shot. The longer you try to stay aimed in for a shot, the harder it is to keep steady. You'll get stronger with practice, but at first your using muscles in ways that aren't familiar. Just work up to it.

Your groups don't look bad, better than lots of folks can do.

If it was easy, anybody could do it.
 

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Pistol Whipper
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It may be from you flinching or pulling your gun from the anticipation of recoil.
In order to diagnose and then cure your flinch, if you have a semi-automatic handgun, you will need to purchase snap caps. Snap caps are inert ammunition-shaped objects you can put into your gun. They are the same size and shape as your regular ammunition, but usually come in bright colors. When a snap cap is loaded into your semi-automatic handgun and the trigger is pulled, all you will hear is a click. Snap caps are not live ammunition. They cannot fire, nor will they cycle the gun's action.
This works best if you have two or three magazines. Fill the magazine with a couple of live rounds, a snap cap, a little more live stuff, another snap cap, and so on. Randomly mix the number and order of snap caps compared to live rounds. If you only have one magazine, have a friend fill it for you while you look elsewhere. If you have two or more magazines, fill them yourself and then shuffle them around so you do not know which one is which.
Now your firearm is loaded partially with real ammunition and partially with fake ammunition which will not fire. The next step is to fire the gun. Line your sights up on the target, focus on the front sight, and steadily increase pressure on the trigger until the shot fires with a bang. When you get to a snap cap, instead of a bang you will hear a click. And if you have been flinching, you will graphically see the muzzle end of the gun take a deep dive instead of remaining steady as it should.
Good luck and practice makes perfect.
 

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Registered
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Google this... 'trigger control chart' to get ideas what might be happening and make appropriate corrections. Don't feel bad. Everyone has these issues and gradually we correct them with practice, practice, practice.
 

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This might help, if you follow the grip and stance that GAGal sent you for the Modified Weaver Stance:

Push outwards towards the target with your right arm (from the shoulder) and with your left arm (at the elbow) pull inwards. The push-pull effect on the grip will help stabilize the gun and helps eliminate a lot of shaking associated with tension in the right wrist and right forearm.

Also, make sure only the pad of the trigger finger is on the trigger (the flesh part beneath the fingernail) and not the finger tip nor the first joint.

Let us know if any of the advice here helps.

Cheers!
 

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Junior Member
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
This might help, if you follow the grip and stance that GAGal sent you for the Modified Weaver Stance:

Push outwards towards the target with your right arm (from the shoulder) and with your left arm (at the elbow) pull inwards. The push-pull effect on the grip will help stabilize the gun and helps eliminate a lot of shaking associated with tension in the right wrist and right forearm.

Also, make sure only the pad of the trigger finger is on the trigger (the flesh part beneath the fingernail) and not the finger tip nor the first joint.

Let us know if any of the advice here helps.

Cheers!
Yup, that was one of the improvements I made after getting that info from GAGal :) It helped me since the last time I was at the range.

My husband has some Snap Caps, that is my next act of business when I hit the range again.

I am right handed, with the added bonus of being left eye dominant. I'm going to try shooting lefty next time when I am at the range, too. I shoot my bow left handed :)

Thanks for the helpful replies!
 

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In the Modified Weaver Stance, your head is naturally pointed off-target and to the right, with your cheek on top of your right shoulder. Moving your head just a little bit more to the right, you will be able to aim with the dominant left eye.
 

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Looks like your just staying aimed in too long at a stretch, not uncommon. Wrists & hands get tired, & you start pushing the trigger off to the left, presuming your right handed, that is. Try loading six in the mag to cut back on the weight of the gun, and take each shot individually, drop, relax your arm, & re-aim for the next shot. The longer you try to stay aimed in for a shot, the harder it is to keep steady. You'll get stronger with practice, but at first your using muscles in ways that aren't familiar. Just work up to it.

Your groups don't look bad, better than lots of folks can do.

If it was easy, anybody could do it.
Good advice.This was my problem when I first started shooting.I'd get tired and was just wasting ammo.
 

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Junior Member
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Looks like your just staying aimed in too long at a stretch, not uncommon. Wrists & hands get tired, & you start pushing the trigger off to the left, presuming your right handed, that is. Try loading six in the mag to cut back on the weight of the gun, and take each shot individually, drop, relax your arm, & re-aim for the next shot. The longer you try to stay aimed in for a shot, the harder it is to keep steady. You'll get stronger with practice, but at first your using muscles in ways that aren't familiar. Just work up to it.

Your groups don't look bad, better than lots of folks can do.

If it was easy, anybody could do it.
My husband keeps saying that, too, about if it was easy :D

I usually will put gun on the bench every few shots, next time I will try it this way and drop my arm between each one instead. Thanks for the help!
 
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