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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there!

Just bought a Gen 4 Glock 22 and I wanted to check if it's true that using reload for Glocks is not a good option because it may causes the ammo to jam? The sales person informed me that I should break in the Glock using FMJs of about 100 rounds or more. To be honest I've fire tested my unit with teflon reloads and never experienced any issues with it.

On a separate topic, is it also true that frequent dry firing is also not a good idea since it may cause damage? I dry fire almost everyday to get a good feel of the new Glock.

Thank you for your inputs in advance!
 

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Greetings and welcome to the forum!!!

Dry firing: it's not going to hurt your Glock as it is part of the "takedown" process for disaassembly. It would be a serious design flaw it dry firing was required, but also damaged the pistol. If worse comes to worse, grab a pack of "Snap caps" for $15 bucks and load them in the mag. They're great training aids (have someone load one of these into your mag randomly- you'll see if you have trigger pull issues) and prevent any possible striker/firing pin damage.

Reloads- It's not that the reloads will cause the pistol to jam. The issue with reloads is two fold (as I see it). First off, it's a liability issue. Manufacturers make barrels to specific tolerances and the last thing they need is some person suing them becuase this person shot a double charged (too much powder) reload. Most all manufacturers state "manufactured ammo only" as a way to cover themselves.
Second problem with reloads is the type of rifling Glock uses in it's barrels. SInce it's not "traditional, land and groove" rifling, you have a higher chance of lead fouling with non-plated/jacketed bullets. MOst folks re-load with the cheapest stuff possible so they use "plain" lead bullets. I do know a local shop here, who has several competitive shooters that use Glocks and they exclusively shoot plated lead out of the stock barrels. Combined, they've run through millions of rounds without any issues. Take this with a grain of salt as not all "plated" lead bullets are the same.

As with all things, YMMV.

Welcome to the forum!

D
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Greetings and welcome to the forum!!!

Dry firing: it's not going to hurt your Glock as it is part of the "takedown" process for disaassembly. It would be a serious design flaw it dry firing was required, but also damaged the pistol. If worse comes to worse, grab a pack of "Snap caps" for $15 bucks and load them in the mag. They're great training aids (have someone load one of these into your mag randomly- you'll see if you have trigger pull issues) and prevent any possible striker/firing pin damage.

Reloads- It's not that the reloads will cause the pistol to jam. The issue with reloads is two fold (as I see it). First off, it's a liability issue. Manufacturers make barrels to specific tolerances and the last thing they need is some person suing them becuase this person shot a double charged (too much powder) reload. Most all manufacturers state "manufactured ammo only" as a way to cover themselves.
Second problem with reloads is the type of rifling Glock uses in it's barrels. SInce it's not "traditional, land and groove" rifling, you have a higher chance of lead fouling with non-plated/jacketed bullets. MOst folks re-load with the cheapest stuff possible so they use "plain" lead bullets. I do know a local shop here, who has several competitive shooters that use Glocks and they exclusively shoot plated lead out of the stock barrels. Combined, they've run through millions of rounds without any issues. Take this with a grain of salt as not all "plated" lead bullets are the same.

As with all things, YMMV.

Welcome to the forum!

D

that was really helpful!! thank you dwcfastrice!!
 

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Glocks don't really need to be "broken in", but they are considered by some to be broken in around 10,000 rounds. And the business is about not using reloads is spot on to what dwcfastrice posted.
 

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I try to dry fire at least three times a week and never had a problem. Out of my 7 gen4s only one has seen factory ammo and that's the 26 which has had 100 of factory stuff the rest have been reloads. My 22 has had a touch over 6000 rounds through it, every one made in my basement. Never had a problem.
 

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Glocks about the only pistol that dry firing doesn't seem to be a problem, but they do sell the snap caps that you can us to check on load and trigger pull function, if your worried about dry firing.
I had a few left over from my 1911 days and I us ethem to check for ammo feed and shell ejection function.
 

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Dry firing is not a problem with any modern firearm, except some rimfires.

As already stated, reloads won't cause misfires, FTF, or FTE unless its a bad reload. However, Glock tells you to not use reloads as it will void the warranty.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Dry firing is not a problem with any modern firearm, except some rimfires.

As already stated, reloads won't cause misfires, FTF, or FTE unless its a bad reload. However, Glock tells you to not use reloads as it will void the warranty.

Is there a way to tell if the pistol was fired using reloads? Given that it can void the warranty...
 

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Is there a way to tell if the pistol was fired using reloads? Given that it can void the warranty...
If it was firing lead bullets, and not thoroughly cleaned you will see lead in the 'rifling' of the barrel. If they were jacketed bullet reloads you can't tell. The only way Glock would know would be if you get a kaboom, turn it in for warranty work, and Glock wants to see the casing that blewup inside.
 

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If it was firing lead bullets, and not thoroughly cleaned you will see lead in the 'rifling' of the barrel. If they were jacketed bullet reloads you can't tell. The only way Glock would know would be if you get a kaboom, turn it in for warranty work, and Glock wants to see the casing that blewup inside.
This, how ever, i suppose if they wanted to spend the money, which wouldn't be cost effective, they could try to get powder samples and compare it to what the factory uses since supposedly, we can't buy the EXACT powder factories use, don't know if that really true or urban legend.
 

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This, how ever, i suppose if they wanted to spend the money, which wouldn't be cost effective, they could try to get powder samples and compare it to what the factory uses since supposedly, we can't buy the EXACT powder factories use, don't know if that really true or urban legend.
I wonder if thats CSI fodder or the real deal. I know for explosions investigations they can tell the type of explosive used, but I didn't think they could tell a manufacturer. That's got me curious now, might have to ask around.
 

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I wonder if thats CSI fodder or the real deal. I know for explosions investigations they can tell the type of explosive used, but I didn't think they could tell a manufacturer. That's got me curious now, might have to ask around.
Not sure, What I heard from a FBI agent is, they can tell if you used factory ammo vs reloads by the chemical traces left behind. I have no reason to doubt him other than my total distrust for federal agents after what happened with my FFL back in 96. But, I there is no reason for him to make it up, so take it for what its worth.
 

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I dry fire the hell out of my 3 Glocks and everything else I own except rimfire...no worries.

The issue about reloads isn't so much about reliability, it's not difficult to build cartridges to the same dimensions as factory ammo. The issue is more about case fatigue. Glocks are designed for law enforcement and military markets and their prime intention is to produce pistols that will cycle tens of thousands of rounds...flawlessly. To promote this, the chamber dimensions are a touch bigger in Glocks than some other manufacturers. Also the feed ramp is large and aggressive to accept ammo from any manufacturer with any bullet type. The big feed ramp causes what has come to be known as Glock's "unsupported chamber" which you can find tons of bad press about all over the net. It would be more accurately referred to as "not fully supported" but the Glock bashers need to exaggerate something about a perfect platform to feel justified in thrashing it. Truth is all major auto pistol manufacturers that design guns for law and military don't have fully supported chambers either. If they did they wouldn't feed worth a damn or they'd be huge pistols with long slide travel, neither of which would sell very well with M & P. You can see what I'm getting at if you remove your barrel, hold it in your hand pointing at the floor and drop a round in. You see alot of exposed brass on that case especially at the feed ramp. That means when you fire it the exposed brass is taking a hell of a push from the powder charge. Sometimes you can even see a bulge in the spent case in this area. The resizing die usually shoves the brass back to spec but all the extra working on that unsupported brass weakens it more. Repetitive reloading of the same case...which all us reloaders do...eventually weakening it to the point of failure at the unsupported area on the next firing. Glocks have a worse reputation for this partially because they do tend to have more relief in the chamber and feed ramp than other pistols, which is also why they run better than other pistols. The other reason Glocks have a worse reputation for this is because they're perfect so alot of folks buy them and theres ALOT of them out there...therefore more kabooms than other manufacturers. Using this against Glock would be like not buying a chevy because more chevy's blow motors at the drag strip. Again a true statement but where I live there's about five times as many chevys at the strip...get it?



So...if you reload for Glocks or anything that doesn't have a fully supported chamber keep a CLOSE eye on your brass...and ditch it at any sign of fatigue, standard practice for any reloader. You can also buy aftermarket barrels that have more fully supported chambers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I dry fire the hell out of my 3 Glocks and everything else I own except rimfire...no worries.

The issue about reloads isn't so much about reliability, it's not difficult to build cartridges to the same dimensions as factory ammo. The issue is more about case fatigue. Glocks are designed for law enforcement and military markets and their prime intention is to produce pistols that will cycle tens of thousands of rounds...flawlessly. To promote this, the chamber dimensions are a touch bigger in Glocks than some other manufacturers. Also the feed ramp is large and aggressive to accept ammo from any manufacturer with any bullet type. The big feed ramp causes what has come to be known as Glock's "unsupported chamber" which you can find tons of bad press about all over the net. It would be more accurately referred to as "not fully supported" but the Glock bashers need to exaggerate something about a perfect platform to feel justified in thrashing it. Truth is all major auto pistol manufacturers that design guns for law and military don't have fully supported chambers either. If they did they wouldn't feed worth a damn or they'd be huge pistols with long slide travel, neither of which would sell very well with M & P. You can see what I'm getting at if you remove your barrel, hold it in your hand pointing at the floor and drop a round in. You see alot of exposed brass on that case especially at the feed ramp. That means when you fire it the exposed brass is taking a hell of a push from the powder charge. Sometimes you can even see a bulge in the spent case in this area. The resizing die usually shoves the brass back to spec but all the extra working on that unsupported brass weakens it more. Repetitive reloading of the same case...which all us reloaders do...eventually weakening it to the point of failure at the unsupported area on the next firing. Glocks have a worse reputation for this partially because they do tend to have more relief in the chamber and feed ramp than other pistols, which is also why they run better than other pistols. The other reason Glocks have a worse reputation for this is because they're perfect so alot of folks buy them and theres ALOT of them out there...therefore more kabooms than other manufacturers. Using this against Glock would be like not buying a chevy because more chevy's blow motors at the drag strip. Again a true statement but where I live there's about five times as many chevys at the strip...get it?



So...if you reload for Glocks or anything that doesn't have a fully supported chamber keep a CLOSE eye on your brass...and ditch it at any sign of fatigue, standard practice for any reloader. You can also buy aftermarket barrels that have more fully supported chambers.
Just to make sure we're on the same page, when you say brass I'm assuming ammo shell? How do you tell if the shell isn't reloadable anymore?

On a side note, is snap caps and dummy bullets one and the same?

Thanks again for all the feedbacks, very helpful!!!
 

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Yes, there are numerous signs that brass (shell casing) is not safe to reload. It would be futile to review them all here and misleading to make you think I could describe enough to keep you safe. If you want to get into reloading any decent reloading manual will explain the bad signs with images to help you identify them. You also need to keep track of the history of your brass as the "signs" can be so subtle as the case may look fine but needed to be trimmed too many times. This would indicate that the case kept stretching and thinning at the walls and the brass density that is supposed to be at the base and head to prevent case rupture has now been pushed up to the mouth and cut off by your trimmer. Again this is just one example in a web of practices you will adopt if you get into reloading.
 
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