Training the kids

Discussion in 'Glock Forum' started by Sarabian, Feb 8, 2012.

  1. Sarabian

    Sarabian Slightly Opinionated

    How many of you regularly train your kids on the use of firearms, and make sure they can take a weapon and make it safe? I drill my oldest on clearing pistols, rifles, and shotguns, as well as loading all of them. I also go over tactics on what to do if someone is trying to get in. He knows how to use cover and concealment, knows to dial 911 immediately and let the operator and the bad guy know that he is armed and will shoot anyone that enters the house that isn't in uniform. When I'm not home, he is in charge of protecting his brother and sister. I have faith that he could do it, too.
     
  2. AMEN..... We practice the same at our house.
     

  3. bhale187

    bhale187 New Member Supporter

    My kids are still a bit young for anything other than firearm safety rules and calling 911. We also have gone over what to do in case of fire or tornado, good to be prepared for anything really. My daughter is 6 so this summer I am thinking she'll be ready to start handling a pellet gun to understand fundamentals of sight alignment and such. My son is only 3 so he's not ready for anything beyond the NRA's Eddie Eagle video and lectures on never touching a firearm.
     
  4. Happysniper1

    Happysniper1 New Member

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    I have prepared my two daughters as much as I can. At 23 and 19 (eldest already has her CCW), they can confidently and accurately use and service all my firearms, including the shotguns.

    Started them young. By ages 11 and 7, I had them shooting full auto M-16's, mini UZIs with suppressors, H&K MP5s, and even a Robar .50BMG bolt-action rifle. One of my kids was State Champion two years in a row in Junior Olympic rifle shooting.

    One thing I did early on: I would take them out into the desert, load whatever handgun I brought along with only one round, and have them shoot it without hearing protection on. Just one round. It demonstrates to them what it would sound/feel like if they played with any of the guns at home before they were old enough to be responsibly trusted unattended around a loaded firearm.

    Remember: kids learn early on that guns are toys....they see it on TV and in the movies, then they get waterguns and plastic toy guns and rubber band guns and such, and to them it is all play. You need to unlearn that from them. Nothing does it faster than the report, the heat from the muzzle blast, the ball of fire at the muzzle, and a water bottle exploding. Now, tell them, what would you do if that 1-gallon water bottle was your friend Tommy's head? Teach them, and get them thinking for themselves. Of course, some kids just want the blood and gore of video games, and there is no cure for that. Kids like that scare me.

    Shooting for kids should start out as fun and recreational, but never try to hide that fact that someone can be killed by a single "bang!"

    Now, my eldest wants to accompany me to my next shooting competition (she already has a CCW). My youngest wants me to buy her a gun, but it's an Anshutz (did I spell that right) and costs a couple grand...hah! I built her an M4, and she's an excellent shot.

    Another aspect of teaching your child to ENJOY shooting is to encourage her friends (her peers) to taste the sport with her. I have taken my kids on many occasions out shooting with their friends (after having a person-to-person talk with the parents, of course!) out in the desert to shoot at reactive targets like water bottles that burst when hit, or clay pigeons mounted on steel rods, or Tannerite (exploding targets) and now you can get those bright organge "self-healing" targets that bounce all over the place when hit and are reusable. They enjoy it, and I encourage them to take pictures as souvenirs. Of course, I turn into the RANGE SAFETY NAZI for these, and have at least once had a kid go sit in the car and not shoot at all because he just wanted to play with the gun. All my instruction is with unloaded guns, then I start training on sight alingment, grip and stance with an airsoft BB gun, before I hand them a real one. I make them cock it, and only have one round in the magazine, on the first live fire. None of them are allowed to reload the magazines, only me or my daugters. I can regulate who shoots by controlling the ammo. I do not shoot, but instead keep my eyes on every single one of them every single second of the time. If I slip up, one of them can get seriously hurt, or worse. But the stress and tension of the responsibility lasts only until I ask them to show me the gun is empty ("safe and show clear") and put the ammo and guns away. Then we go to the pizza joint so they can wash up, I buy a couple of pizzas and soda for them, call their folks and tell them we are done and where we are, and everybody has a good time! If the kid grows up, and in his entire life only had one chance to hold and shoot a gun, you want it to be in a safe and responsible manner, and you want that kid to grow up remembering "Karen's dad taught me how to shoot, and it was scary, but it was fun! I enjoyed shooting his guns, and now I know how to make sure a gun is safe to hold." If nothing else, the experience will last them their whole lifetime.

    I have had more than one of my daughters' friends tell me their folks want to come along the next time, and have eventually trained and certified for CCW several parents this way.

    When you look at your kid and say, "naah, too young", think about this: when my youngest daugther was 8 years old, she shot and scored on a .50BMG bolt-action rifle! It was, I think, a good start!
     
  5. kodiak

    kodiak Active Member

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    Start teaching them safety and fundamentals with their toy guns
     
  6. series11

    series11 Hail Commifornia Lifetime Supporting Member

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    You are awesome Happysniper. My son is almost two and he sees me carry inside the house and knows mostly not to touch it. When it comes time I will work him from airsoft to bb gun to .22 and then on. I think that this type of responsibility and respect is good for chilren and if they are interested in it, then it can be a good family time. Good job on teaching your children and hope I can do the same to mine.
     
  7. Happysniper1

    Happysniper1 New Member

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    My youngest daughter, at 8 years of age, shooting a Glock-18 on full auto. Count the casings, and check her sight grip, stance, and sight alingment....
     

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  8. Happysniper1

    Happysniper1 New Member

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    Also see the smile on her face!
     
  9. series11

    series11 Hail Commifornia Lifetime Supporting Member

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    Awesome shot man!!!! I can't wait till my boy gets big enough to take him out shooting.
     
  10. Glockmaster

    Glockmaster New Member

    I have been training my oldest for the past 2 years. He is 14 now. He loves shooting!!! I will continue his training as long as he wants. I feel confident if i wasn't home he would be able to protect his mother & is 2 younger brothers.
     
  11. Happysniper1

    Happysniper1 New Member

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    And remember, gents (and ladies lurking in the background) --- when you take your kids shooting, take pictures! It's just like taking them to Disneyland!