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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am a relative n00b, but I have heard so many different arguments and reasons, and some say "Yes, you can do it; I do it all the time!" while others say, "NO! DON'T DO IT EVER! YOUR GUN WILL BLOW UP!"

Well,... is there a definitive answer to the question: Can you safely shoot "lead" ammo from a stock Glock or not? What are the alternatives, explanations, advice?

Thanks in advance!
 

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I am a relative n00b, but I have heard so many different arguments and reasons, and some say "Yes, you can do it; I do it all the time!" while others say, "NO! DON'T DO IT EVER! YOUR GUN WILL BLOW UP!"

Well,... is there a definitive answer to the question: Can you safely shoot "lead" ammo from a stock Glock or not? What are the alternatives, explanations, advice?

Thanks in advance!
It would be a NO-NO to a stock barrel. I'm pretty sure everyone would agree on this one. Invest in an aftermarket barrel if you wan't to shoot lead/reloads.
 

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The manufacturer Glock advises against using lead bullets (meaning bullets not covered by a copper jacket) in their polygonally rifled barrels, which has led to a widespread belief that polygonal rifling is not compatible with lead bullets. Firearms expert and barrel maker, the late Gale McMillan, has also commented that lead bullets and polygonal rifling are not a good mix.

Furthermore, Dave Spaulding, well-known gun writer, reported in the February/March 2008 issue of Handguns Magazine that when he queried H&K about their polygonally rifled barrels that they (H&K) commented: "It has been their experience that polygonal rifling will foul with lead at a greater rate than will conventional rifling."

One suggestion of what the "additional factor involved in Glock's warning" might be is that Glock barrels have a fairly sharp transition between the chamber and the rifling, and this area is prone to lead buildup if lead bullets are used. This buildup may result in failures to fully return to bttery, allowing the gun to fire with the case not fully supported by the chamber, leading to a potentially dangerous case failure. However, since this sharp transition is found on most autopistols this speculation is of limited value. The sharp transition or "lip" at the front of the chamber is required to "headspace" the cartridge in most autopistols.

Leading is the buildup of lead in the bore that happens in nearly all firearms firing high velocity lead bullets. This lead buildup must be cleaned out regularly, or the barrel will gradually become constricted resulting in higher than normal discharge pressures. In the extreme case, increased discharge pressures can result in a catastrophic incident.





A number of advantages are claimed by the supporters of polygonal rifling. These include:

  • Not compromising the barrel's thickness in the area of each groove as with traditional rifling.
  • Providing a better gas seal around the projectile as polygonal bores tend to have a slightly smaller bore area, which translates into more efficient use of the combustion gases trapped behind the bullet, slightly greater (consistency in) muzzle velocities and slightly increased accuracy.
  • Less bullet deformation, resulting in reduced drag on the bullet when traveling through the barrel which helps to increase muzzle velocity.
  • Reduced buildup of copper or lead within the barrel which results in easier maintenance characteristics.
  • Prolonged barrel life.



The term "polygonal rifling" is fairly general, and different manufacturers employ varying polygonal rifling profiles. H&K, CZ and Glock use a female type of polygonal rifling similar to the bore shown above right. This type has a smaller bore area than the male type of polygonal rifling designed and used by Lothar Walther. Other companies such as Noveske (Pac Nor) and LWRC use a rifling more like the conventional rifling with both of the lands sides being sloped but has a flat top and defined corners, this type of rifling is more of a canted land type of rifling than polygonal rifling.


SOURCE: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polygonal_rifling
 

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Good response Shooter!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
How about copper fouling

Thanks so much for the info on lead.

Next,... How about the copper build up in the barrel?
Is that "bad" and how do I get it out if it is bad?
 

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we7hills said:
Thanks so much for the info on lead.

Next,... How about the copper build up in the barrel?
Is that "bad" and how do I get it out if it is bad?
Clean your gun. I've heard folks say not to use Hoppes, but since I don't know a lot about cleaning supplies info know that they make a cleaning solution for copper buildup removal that I use in my .22LR and g30.

Many folks will field strip and clean their guns after every range trip, but many also go a few hundred or thousand rounds before field stripping and cleaning.

Detailed strip to clean isn't recommended for low use, only after thousands of rounds.

Some folks just use a bore snake between outings to knock out any loose fouling.
 

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Copper Fouling Removal products...

My favorite copper solvent...

KG-12 ( non-ammonia based )

KG-12 was developed specifically to clean the copper from large bore military weapons. Unlike ammonia based products, there is no need to
neutralize or remove it quickly because it contains no ammonia.

http://www.kgcoatings.com/cleaning/kg-12-big-bore-cleaner/


Other products I have used...

Hoppe's #9
Sweets 7.62
Breakfree CLP
Ed's Red (home brew)
Kroil
 

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My favorite copper solvent...

KG-12 ( non-ammonia based )

KG-12 was developed specifically to clean the copper from large bore military weapons. Unlike ammonia based products, there is no need to
neutralize or remove it quickly because it contains no ammonia.

http://www.kgcoatings.com/cleaning/kg-12-big-bore-cleaner/


Other products I have used...

Hoppe's #9
Sweets 7.62
Breakfree CLP
Ed's Red (home brew)
Kroil
I have converted to KG as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks, again!

Where's the best place / price to get the KG-12?
I'll try that, next.

Could / Should I use anything but the stock "nylon" barrel brush inside the Glock barrel? Is a bore-snake ok?
 

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I use the bore snake for fast cleanings...but field strip and

use the Glock provided brush (among other things) when I really

want to do a good job and get into every corner.
 

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There seems to mixed opinions and some that even contradict themselves? How can one say that polygonal rifling and lead bullets dont' mix well and then further state that there is less bullet deformation, which helps in reduced buildup of copper or lead within the barrel which results in easier maintenance characteristics. These two seem to me to be opposites, but I know I have a lot to learn.
I do think we need to define the term "lead bullet," used here as a generic term for anything without a jacket. Lead is an extremely soft bullet and is what I use in a muzzleloader with lubricant and a cloth patch. I don't think this soft "lead bullet" should ever be loaded in a cartridge without being patched. On the other hand, there is such a thing as a "hard cast bullet" which many thousands of shooters around the nation load and shoot, with accuracy, safety, and another bonus they are CHEAP! I'll let one of the local bullet casters explain it...WAY better than I.
http://www.missouribullet.com/technical.php
And before anyone suggests it...I do not work for or make any money for this. Just trying to pass on info that will allow you to shoot more, isn't that our dream here?
I have shot literally thousands through a Glock 23, 27, 26 with very little or no leading. On my average range day I will shoot somewhere between 100-150 rounds and always clean my guns when getting home, like I said with little or no leading. The last batch I loaded for 9's cost just nine cents each, with forties at 12! Even us country folk can afford to shoot! But, seriously, it just chaps my hide to load premium jacketed hollow-points to kill a paper target, while a cheap hard cast one will do it every bit as good.
 

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Welcome to the Glock Forum PC5623 !!

Due to the polygonal rifling in all Glock firearms, leading is a problem.

But, as you have pointed out, lead can be shot through a Glock...as long as you're

aware of the problem, and clean your weapon as you stated...then you're right...

shoot all the hard cast lead bullets you want...it's your gun !!
 
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