This Day in Military History

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by nemesis, Dec 1, 2013.

  1. TheKraken

    TheKraken 2021, Hold my beer Staff Member Moderator Lifetime Supporting Member

    September 30, 1918

    During World War I, German submarine U-152 sinks USS Ticonderoga. Seriously wounded early in the battle, commanding officer Lt. Cmdr. James J. Madison remains on the bridge controlling the ships fight until she is abandoned. The lost included 112 Sailors and 101 Soldiers and was the greatest combat loss of life on any US Navy ship during World War I. For his "exceptionally heroic service" during this action, Lt. Cmdr. Madison is awarded the Medal of Honor.
     
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  2. Old Bloke

    Old Bloke Grumpy Old Man Supporter

    !8th August 1966

    Battle of Long Tan comences
     
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  3. LElliott

    LElliott Well-Known Member

    Nov. 9th 2016, WWIII begins.
     
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  4. Danzig

    Danzig Glockin’ since 1993 Supporter

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  5. Bayou

    Bayou Well-Known Member

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    Speaking of "Liberator", these Liberator pistols are selling for as much as $1,800.00. If you also have the box it came in, which is extremely rare, the box ALONE is worth $2,000.00. They say the boxes are extremely rare because almost all were immediately destroyed since nobody would want to be caught by the Nazis with evidence that they had a gun. They sure look rough to be worth so much.

    https://www.invaluable.com/auction-...iberator-pistol-complete-as-1163-c-3329932be3
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2020
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  6. Danzig

    Danzig Glockin’ since 1993 Supporter

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    Seemed like a good place for this video.
     
  7. mattm

    mattm Remove me..Security sucks. Supporter

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    a favorite of mine regarding this subject
     
  8. Old Bloke

    Old Bloke Grumpy Old Man Supporter

    11/11/1918 at 11 am Armisiste is signed in Paris signaling the 'War to End All Wars' is over (WW1) Seems we haven't learnt much as a species!
     
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  9. Bayou

    Bayou Well-Known Member

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    I hate to say it, but I think as long as there are human beings on earth there will always be some kind of fighting.
     
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  10. Danzig

    Danzig Glockin’ since 1993 Supporter

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    Navy Sunday – The Navy First Jack
    November 29th, 2020
    I wanted to write about the U.S. Navy’s first Jack and the history of “Don’t tread on me” in the U.S. Navy, to give people the history of it and to show where it came from and that it had nothing to do with anything other than to tell the King of England we don’t work for you no more. The Navy Jack is not to be confused with the Gadsden flag (yellow flag with a collided up snake, see below). Which possibly started as the flag of South Caroline and later the first Commodores of the U.S. Navy fleet.

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    The rattlesnake (specifically, the Timber Rattlesnake) is especially significant and symbolic to the American Revolution. The rattle has thirteen layers, signifying the original Thirteen Colonies. Additionally, the snake does not strike until provoked, a quality echoed by the phrase “Don’t tread on me.”

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    The United States Navy originally started as the Continental Navy, established during the American Revolution by the Continental Congress by a resolution of 13 October 1775. There is a widespread belief that the Continental Navy ships flew a jack consisting of alternating red and white stripes, having the image of a rattlesnake stretched out across it, with the motto “Don’t Tread on Me.” That is actually hard to prove as “fact.” But there was a letter in 1778 that John Adams and Benjamin Franklin wrote to the Ambassador of the Kingdom of Sicily, thanking him for allowing entry of U.S. ships into Sicilian ports. The letter describes the U.S. flag according to the 1777 Flag Resolution but also tells a banner of “South Carolina, a rattlesnake, in the middle of the thirteen stripes.

    It is well documented that the rattlesnake and the motto “Don’t Tread on Me” were used together on several flags during the War of Independence or The American war’ / ‘the war with America ‘as the British call it. The only question in doubt is whether the Continental Navy used a red and white striped flag with a rattlesnake and the motto “Don’t Tread on Me” as its Jack. The evidence is inconclusive, but there are a lot of reasons to think it was. There is reason to believe that the Continental Navy Jack was simply a red and white striped flag with no other adornment.

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    The rattlesnake emerged as a symbol of the colonies of North America about the time of the Seven Years War or the French and Indiana war( the Seven-year war was a global conflict that involved every great European power from 1756-1763 ) when the motto “Join or Die.” first appeared in Benjamin Franklin’s Pennsylvania Gazette in 1754, like a political cartoon reflecting on the Albany Congress. It was intended to get the Americans to join against the French during this time.

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    By the time of the War of Independence, the rattlesnake, frequently used in conjunction with the motto “Don’t Tread on Me,” was a common symbol for the United States, its independent spirit, and its resistance to tyranny. Two American military units of the Revolution are known to have used the rattlesnake and the “Don’t Tread on Me” motto: Proctor’s Independent Battalion of Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, and Sullivan’s Life Guard during the Rhode Island campaign of 1777. The rattlesnake and the motto also appeared on military accouterments, such as drums, and state paper currency, during the Revolution.

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    The rattlesnake’s image and the motto “Don’t Tread on Me” certainly had associations with the Continental Navy.

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    On 27 February 1777, a group of Continental Navy officers proposed that the full-dress uniform of Continental Navy captains include a gold epaulet on the right shoulder with “the figure of a Rattle Snake Embroidered on the Strap . . . with the Motto don’t tread on me.”

    In early 1776 Commodore Esek Hopkins, the first and only commander in chief of the Continental Navy fleet used a personal standard (flag) designed by Christopher Gadsden of South Carolina. This flag consisted of a yellow field with a coiled snake and the motto “Don’t Tread on Me.” There is no doubt about the authenticity of Hopkins’s standard, usually referred to as “the Gadsden flag.”

    The only written description of the Continental Navy jack contemporary with the American Revolution appears in Commodore Hopkins’s “Signals for the American Fleet,” January 1776, described as “the striped jack.” No document says that the Jack had a rattlesnake or motto on it. Elsewhere, Hopkins mentions using a “striped flag” as a signal. Since American merchant ships often displayed a simple red and white striped flag, there is a good chance that the striped Jack to which Hopkins refers was the same striped flag used by American merchant ships.

    An 18th-century portrait of Esek Hopkins shows him where several warships are displayed. One flies a white flag, with a tree, and the mottos “Liberty Tree,” and “An appeal to God.”(posable Massachusetts first flag, and as the U.S. Navy was started in Mass) Another warship flies a striped flag with a rattlesnake and the motto “Don’t Tread Upon Me.”

    The flags in these prints are not at the bow, where a jack would go, but at the stern, the proper place for the national ensign. Again, the pine tree flag was the flag that Mass wanted as the Nation ensign and used by all ships from Mass, and again the Navy was born in Mass, so it goes to say that might have that flag on there. Also, let’s be clear that New England and South Caroline basally started the war. So it also goes to say they would be on our ships. The historical evidence makes it impossible to say whether the Continental Navy used the striped rattlesnake flag as its Jack.

    Simultaneously, the evidence suggests strong connections between the symbol of the rattlesnake with the motto “Don’t Tread on Me” and the United States’ earliest naval traditions. Fast forward to 9/11/ 2002. The Navy authorized all active merchant and coast guard ships to fly the First Navy Jack on their bow in port. They did this on the first anniversary of 9/11. Before then, the longest servicing ship was the only ship that was allowed to use it to show they were the oldest commissioned ship still in service (not counting the USS Constitution). All U.S. Navy personal adopted it in the Persian Gulf to wear on their shoulder fighting in the War on Terroir. It is still allowed to be worn on the Navy Working Uniform. The Navy has since gone back to the tradition of only the oldest ship using the “don’t tread on me” flag. Now the USS Blue Ridge. I hate to think this is happening because people think it means something that it doesn’t. So, it is clear that the flag has a long history with the Navy and the U.S.

    I wanted to write this because it is now apparently a racist symbol. I am tired of things being highjacked by groups, and, let say, someone who has served 26 years in the Navy can’t wear it, or people think they are a racist. I am not pollical (I say as I write this). If you are a racist, white, black, green, blue, whatever color you are, go out and make a shirt that says “I am a racist” stop taking things from our history that have nothing to do with race and saying that it does. Stop taking history and twisting it into something for yourself. Man, up if you want to be a racist, come up with your own symbol. Don’t make it complicated. Make hats, shirts, and stickers that just say you are a racist. That way, it won’t confuse you or your buddies, and everyone will know where you stand. But don’t use something that has meant so much to this great country’s history and claim it implies something that it never has.
     
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  11. Lucian_253

    Lucian_253 Well-Known Member Supporter

    Thanks for posting!! The Gadsden flag has been my favorite flag since I was around 5 or 6 years old.
     
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  12. SJ 40

    SJ 40 Well-Known Member

    Speaking of the U S Navy and where it began.

    George Washington employed in the autumn and winter of 1775 to prey on enemy transports. The claim of Whitehall, New York, is based on naval and amphibious operations on Lake Champlain undertaken by the Continental Army under the command of Ethan Allen and Benedict Arnold.

    The first Gunboats and transport boats were laid down in WhiteHall New York as their first use was by Ethan Allen and Benedict Arnold in the capture of Fort Ticonderoga,New York. The first successful battle in the war for independence as many of the battles took place on Lake Champlain and not at sea,Lake Champlain is the sixth largest body of water in the continental United States.

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    The USS Spitfire constructed in 1776 and recently discovered the ship in Lake Champlain's bottom.

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  13. Danzig

    Danzig Glockin’ since 1993 Supporter

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    Menton Day
    December 5th, 2020
    05 Dec 1944 is a somewhat sad day in SOF history. Known as Menton Day, December 5th marks the last formation of the 1st Special Service Force.

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    The 1st Special Service Force (also called The Devil’s Brigade, The Black Devils, The Black Devils’ Brigade, and Freddie’s Freighters), was a combined American-Canadian commando unit in World War II.

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    Organized and trained at Fort William Henry Harrison near Helena, Montana in 1942, the Forcemen fought in the Aleutian Islands, Italy, and southern France before being disbanded on this day in December 1944.

    One of the Force’s most harrowing missions was the attack on Monte La Difensa in Italy during December, 1943, which required the men to climb the mountain and surprise the German defenders.

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    This painting by Peter Dennis comes from tge Osprey book, “RAID 48: Storming Monte La Difensa,” written by Bret Werner.

    Despite being from two different countries, the members of the Force became a United team. The story goes that the FSSF soldiers assembled at 1400 hours for a somber farewell. The order announcing the Canadian’s departure was read, followed by remarks from the commander, Col. Edwin A. Walker, the roll of the fallen, prayers, and a playing of taps. After the FSSF colors were sheathed, the order was given: “All Canadians fall out!” The 620 Canadian soldiers paraded, and received a salute from the Americans.

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    A Canadian sergeant from the 2nd Regiment remarked years later, that “It was the saddest day of my life, I think…Canadians were falling out that I thought were Americans and Americans were standing still who I thought were Canadians…There was no nationality in that bloody unit.”
     
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  14. Southlake

    Southlake Moderator Staff Member Moderator Lifetime Supporting Member

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    Thank you for this post!
     
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  15. Danzig

    Danzig Glockin’ since 1993 Supporter

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    How Elvis saved the U.S.S. Arizona
    December 6th, 2020

    The Japanese attacked on Pearl Harbor killed 2,403 military and civilians personal. A further 1,178 people were injured in the attack. 19 ships were sunk or damaged, and 188 aircraft destroyed. The efforts of the greatest generation raised all but three (The Arizona, The Utah, and The Oklahoma).

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    The wreck of the Arizona immediately became a memorial. Passing ships rendered honors to the Arizona and her crew throughout WW2 and still due to this day. Proposals for a permanent memorial started as early as 1943, but not until 1949 did an organized effort began to take shape with the creation of the Pacific War Memorial Commission (PWMC). As the PWMC considered ideas to formally recognize the role of Hawaii during the war, which would include a memorial to the Arizona, Admiral Arthur Radford had a flagstaff placed on the wreck in 1950. He ordered that the colors be raised at the site every day. This modest memorial was later expanded to include a wooden platform and a commemorative plaque.

    In 1958, President Dwight Eisenhower signed Public Law 85-344 that allowed the PWMC to raise money on the Navy’s behalf for the construction of a memorial to the Arizona. A fundraising goal of $500,000 was set and the initial response from the public was promising. An episode of the popular T.V. series This is Your Life dedicated to Medal of Honor recipient Rear Admiral Samuel Fuqua. (Then Lieutenant Commander Fuqua serving as the U.S.S. Arizona ship’s Damage Control Officer and first lieutenant, and was on board her during Japan’s December 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor. Though knocked unconscious by a bomb that hit the ship’s stern early in the attack, he subsequently directed firefighting and rescue efforts. After the ship’s forward magazines exploded, he was her senior surviving officer and was responsible for saving her remaining crewmen.)

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    That initial call for donations raised over $95,000. However, the project quickly stalled as donations dried up. By the start of 1960, only $155,000 had been raised.

    “Colonel” Tom Parker read about the struggling campaign in a newspaper and spotted an opportunity. As Elvis Presley’s manager, he was eager to get a bit of positive publicity for his client who had been out of circulation for a couple of years after being drafted into the U.S. Army. Parker surmised that a benefit concert for the U.S.S. Arizona Memorial would raise much-needed awareness of the fundraising campaign while also demonstrating that Elvis still had drawing power. Elvis was not only pleased to be able to perform for an audience. He was a patriot who genuinely believed in the cause and wanted to help.

    The PWMC accepted Elvis’s generous offer and began making arrangements with the Navy to use the 4,000 seats Bloch Arena at Pearl Harbor as the venue for the concert. It was the same arena that had hosted the “Battle of Music” the evening before the attack in 1941. The “Battle of Music” was a spirited competition to determine the best ship band in the Pacific Fleet. Although they had been eliminated from contention, the band from Arizona was present and played dance music for the attendees. They would never perform again. The entire band was killed in the explosion on the ship the next morning.

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    With the venue secured and the show scheduled for March 25, 1961, Parker set ticket prices ranging from $3 to $100 and announced that everyone would have to buy a ticket to see the show. Rank usually has its privileges. Still, Parker seemed to take pleasure in rebuffing admirals and generals who approached him about complimentary tickets. When he said he everyone had pay, he meant everyone had to pay — even the performers. Elvis bought a $100 ticket for himself then bought dozens more to give to staff and patients at a military hospital.

    After a brief introduction by Rear Admiral Robert Campbell of the 14th Naval District, Elvis took the stage as hundreds of teenagers screeched in excitement. The King looked resplendent in his signature gold lame jacket with silver sequin lapels. He let out a brief yell of his own in response to the ecstatic audience before launching into his hit “Heartbreak Hotel.” All accounts state that Elvis was in peak form, giving an enthusiastic and energetic performance that included favorites “All Shook Up,” “Don’t Be Cruel,” “Are You Lonesome Tonight,” and “It’s Now or Never.” He finished the show with a rollicking version of “Hound Dog,” during which he slid across the stage on his knees. The 15-song set, and 45 minutes of stage time were among the longest of his career. The concert would also be his last for 8 years.

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    The benefit was a resounding success. Ticket sales accounted for $47,000 with additional donations ($5,000 coming from Elvis), pushing the total take to over $60,000. Funding for the memorial was still well short of its target. Still, the electricity of Elvis had generated the jumpstart the campaign needed. In 1961, Hawaii Senator Daniel Inouye got legislation passed to secure another $150,000 in federal funds. Money began to flow from other sources. The combination of public funds and private donations (including $40,000 from Revelle raised through sale of model kits of the Arizona) reached the goal of $500,000 by September 1961 – just 5 months after the concert. The end of the year completed construction on the memorial.

    The U.S.S. Arizona Memorial was officially dedicated on May 30, 1962. Elvis certainly took pride in his role in building a permanent memorial to the crew of the Arizona. He made several visits to the site on subsequent trips to Hawaii. The memorial has reached its own iconic status and welcomes 1.5 million visitors a year.

    Elvis did not forget the Arizona, and the Navy did not forget Elvis. When Elvis passed away in 1977, the Navy showed its gratitude by placing a wreath for him at the U.S.S. Arizona Memorial.

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    Much of today’s upkeep comes from the fundraising of the American Veteran (AMVETS), a veteran’s service organization that helped to secure around $250,000 in total for the memorial during the 1950s. The organization is responsible for the upkeep of the white marble wall inscribed with the names of the men who perished aboard the U.S.S. Arizona. In 1983, and again in 2014, AMVETS raised funds needed to replace the deteriorating Wall of Remembrance.

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    Elvis was a true American Patriot!
     
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  16. Danzig

    Danzig Glockin’ since 1993 Supporter

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  17. Bayou

    Bayou Well-Known Member

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    RIP Chuck Yeager. A true fearless patriot that lived an amazing life.
     
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  18. SJ 40

    SJ 40 Well-Known Member

    Rest In Peace Gen. Chuck Yeager.

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  19. LElliott

    LElliott Well-Known Member

    Movie made in 1968 called 'The Devil's Brigade' was one about these guys. Just happened to watch it about 2 months ago. Just a clip here.
     
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  20. LElliott

    LElliott Well-Known Member

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