The kaboom theory!!!

Discussion in 'Glock Forum' started by G22GEN4, Jan 20, 2012.

  1. G22GEN4

    G22GEN4 New Member

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    So I have read, that no gun causes kb. That it is simply a lack of training. Unloading & loading a mag of the same rounds constantly,causing the first 2 rounds make contact more times than intended. This causes more pressure to build inside casing. My question to this is, if that's the case, how do explain revolvers?

    What are your thoughts, knowledge, and/or experience on KB?
     
  2. it's mostly the reloaded .40 one has to worry about in the glocks. Because of the high pressure associated with 40 they bulge at the base thus making the case very weak. Not the safest thing on the planet to reload. All the reloaders I personally know will not reload .40 fired from Glocks.

    As far as your statement about no gun causes it.....i beg to differ. If you take a 40 glock barrel and say a 9mm barrel out of the guns and insert a round into each barrel, you can see that on the 40 there is more case exposed right where the ramp is as opposed to the 9mm being pretty much all the way in. That is where the 40 bulge comes from and can been seen in the case after it is fired.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2012

  3. G22GEN4

    G22GEN4 New Member

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    U explained it very well. I kind of figured a gun could cause kb because they explained it in semi-auto pistols but I have also seen rifles, shotguns etc go kb also. Guns that has nothing to do with constant loading & unloading. Although what I read could be somewhat true, I knew it was more to it. I'm gonna check out ur link bro.
     
  4. G22GEN4

    G22GEN4 New Member

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    Yeah I read this article a week ago. There's also a video on YouTube that shows several diff guns that went kb. Also has a live kb in action.
     
  5. Its such a rare occurrence based on the number glocks out there or any gun for that matter that it has been reported on, that its not something i worry about since i don't reload personally but do shoot PLENTY of reloads from my good friend who i trust with my life anyway.
     
  6. G22GEN4

    G22GEN4 New Member

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    I never fired a reload & don't plan in it.
     
  7. Unless we slip into a Book of Eli era you wont see me firing any reloads.
     
  8. When you fire a couple thousand a month you'll reconsider.;)

    Nothing wrong with reloads if done properly.
     
  9. My G19 is 4 years old and has seen over 50,000 rounds. It could be that I don't know enough about them, or that I don't trust a round I make to fire when I need it to. Or both. Plus I grew up with Glocks, my dad and Grand Father when out and bought them the second they hit the market in the 90's. My Grand Father owned a range for 40 something years and used to reload rounds daily and it was pounded into me from an early age do not reload in Glocks.
     
  10. KeenansGarage

    KeenansGarage Hiding in plain sight....

    I have shot plenty of reloads. As long as they are not cast lead bullets, there is not much of a problem shooting reloads in glocks. The exception is in the 40 with hot loads. I have not seen/heard of a 9mm going Kaboom. I have seen issues such as bad primers, overall length too long, etc that will cause jams or failure to fires, but nothing that will blow up the gun. Please may that always be the worse I see in person! I will say, most gun manufacturer's do not honor their warranty if the damaged was caused by a reload.

    Just my .02 cents worth.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2012
  11. jonm61

    jonm61 New Member

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    I agree that no gun, unless there is a manufacturer's defect in the chamber steel, causes a kB.

    I don't know that I'd say it's a training issue either. Yes, setback can cause a problem, but in properly manufactured ammo setback will take a while to induce sufficiently to cause a kB. It's worth keeping an eye on, especially if you're regularly rechambering a round and even moreso if that round is older.

    Generally, the problem comes from ammo; either ammo that has been overcharged, reloaded ammo that has been loaded in a well used or damaged case, or with a bullet that has been seated too deeply or crimped to hard.

    It's rare to have an issue with factory ammo, but it can still happen.

    Personally, because most of my guns are .40s, I stopped using 180gr ammo because of this article: http://www.greent.com/40Page/ammo/40/180gr.htm

    The link I posted above touches on the high and potentially easy overpressure issues with .40s.

    As for guns causing kBs, and specifically Glocks, A) this has changed drastically from 2nd Gen Glocks to Gen4s and Glocks are not the only ones without a completely supported chamber B) Glocks are not the only guns that kB and C) .40 is not the only caliber that kBs.

    The issue was big in early .40 Glocks and because people continue to repeat it and it's on the internet which is forever, they carry that reputation even 25 years later.

    For as many alleged .40 Glock kBs as there have been, there are probably a hundred thousand that have never had a hiccup.

    I will say that this issue does, I believe, occur more often in polymer framed, striker fired, guns than in other designs. I've seen others, including 1st Gen Walther P99s, that had issues with the .40. Not nearly as many as with 2nd Gen Glocks of course.

    So, while guns do not cause the kB, the design of the gun may allow a kB in one gun that would not have happened in another.

    The problem with that article is that the newest information in it is from 2004 and most of it is from 16+ years ago. You won't find info like that that applies to more recent gun production.
     
  12. Steelharp

    Steelharp New Member

    When I have the time for that, I'll be independently wealthy, and it won't matter. :p
     
  13. All that effort to discredit and you ignored this key thing that was stated.........

    :cool:
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2012
  14. jonm61

    jonm61 New Member

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    Whether you worry about it or not is irrelevant to fact that the info in that article is outdated, that Glock has made significant design changes and that those early issues have been repeated endlessly across the internet, making it seem 100 times worse than it actually is. As said to someone in another thread, I like to make sure that complete and accurate info is posted for those who come along later and read this without any prior knowledge.
     
  15. Forget the article, fact is .40's do STILL bulge the case because of high pressure........at least they do on my .40's. There for I wont reload them. Many do but many don't. Not worth the risk be it small to my personal safety.

    EDIT: back on the whole article thing. The OP asked a question. If you had kept up with the OP you would be aware he is indeed new to Glocks and weapons at all so it seems. I was merely explaining to him what specifically he was asking about. Which by the way was pretty apparent he had it all wrong to begin with. If the OP reads the article he would realize it's not that up to date{A lot more up to date than that FBI pdf floating around here from mid 80's on ballistics}. The OP should be able to form his own opinions based on info placed before him. Also you speak of how changes have been made etc etc etc. I don't see any great changes in the Glocks I have that are 15yrs old up to now except the Gen4's.

    Agree to disagree I guess.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2012
  16. skymedik

    skymedik New Member

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    For the benefit of the rookies, could someone please explain what a 'case' is and what it means when it is 'unsupported'? Read about it for months and can't figure out what it means.
     
  17. I will let someone else explain, apparently I know nothing.:D
     
  18. skymedik

    skymedik New Member

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    OK, I finally found annotation 5 on the link posted above.... Think I'm clear on it now.... It's how much the breech end of the barrel covers the case part of the ammunition. Correct-ish?
     
  19. you are correct