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Discussion Starter #1
I want to practice switching targets and magazines fast. Like I know how to switch magazines pretty fast from just watching. How do you'll train on like double tapping then switching targets at the range? Maybe one piece of cardboard with circles on each side to shoot back to back?
 

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I practice this at home during dry fire drills. I like to pick 2 spots on the wall. Usually to light switches across the room from each other. Engage one target. ( still dry practice. No real ammo) the do a speed reload and engage the other target. Try to dry fire practice 20 mins everyday and your speed will improve.

Then at the range work on shooting the "double tap" at one target.
 

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Multiple standing targets.

Remember though, you don't train for speed. You train for smooth. Slow is smooth, smooth is fast.
 

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nukinfuts29 said:
Multiple standing targets.

Remember though, you don't train for speed. You train for smooth. Slow is smooth, smooth is fast.
Thanks to the eternal patience of my firearms instructor, this is starting to stick. ;-)
 

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nukinfuts29 said:
Multiple standing targets.

Remember though, you don't train for speed. You train for smooth. Slow is smooth, smooth is fast.
+1 on that.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Alright so just to clarify on my other question when switching a mag do most people drop it with maybe one or two left that way when u stick the new mag in u don't gotta release the slide u can just pull the trigger and let it rock again?
 

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Alright so just to clarify on my other question when switching a mag do most people drop it with maybe one or two left that way when u stick the new mag in u don't gotta release the slide u can just pull the trigger and let it rock again?
always always always close the slide when dropping, then rack it with the new magazine. Slapping a new magazine in and counting on the slide to drop forward is unreliable as it does not always work. Even when the slide drops you cannot be certain that a round has been chambered, sometimes they are not.
 

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That's one way. When I practice this type of drop I stick it in my back pocket instead of letting it drop to the floor. This way you don't have to rack and you also have a backup round or too if you need it.
 

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In a gun fight id say it would be heard to keep track but in competition yes. It depends on what you want to train for. You could work on retention reloads, speed reloads, slide lock reloads. I would work on them all. Become use to all so if you ever have to preform one during a fight you will know what to do. IMO. I'm not an instructor I just shoot a lot
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Ok so if I got ten in the mag I shoot 8 and the next one chambers I drop the mag with the slide forward and one in the pipe and keep going.
 

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That's one way. When I practice this type of drop I stick it in my back pocket instead of letting it drop to the floor. This way you don't have to rack and you also have a backup round or too if you need it.
the problem with this is it relies on counting rounds, that only works on the range*

**unless you have been counting them for 25 years. For example i used to count gears in my ATV's when racing as a kid. To this day i always know where i am.
 

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nukinfuts29 said:
the problem with this is it relies on counting rounds, that only works on the range*

**unless you have been counting them for 25 years. For example i used to count gears in my ATV's when racing as a kid. To this day i always know where i am.
Not that many years YET but some day. :)
 

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glockguy13 said:
Alright from what I'm getting it's just best to practice all of them a lot.
Yep. And when reloading, time and opportunity comes into play. If your shooting and the slide locks back Time to reload. If your shooting and the threat is down and your not getting shoot at, retention reload. Basically yes practice them all lol
 

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nukinfuts29 said:
Multiple standing targets.

Remember though, you don't train for speed. You train for smooth. Slow is smooth, smooth is fast.
Exactly.

The speed comes with time.

When you really know your firearm you are no longer using the sites to hit your target. You know where that bullet is going to hit the moment you draw.
 

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Alright so just to clarify on my other question when switching a mag do most people drop it with maybe one or two left that way when u stick the new mag in u don't gotta release the slide u can just pull the trigger and let it rock again?
If you're training for self defense/combat scenarios, you should not let your magazine run dry. You should be locating and moving towards cover. When you are behind cover and there is a lull in the action, you reload. If you're magazine is dry and the bad guy's still shooting, you're in trouble.

Just because your initial bad guy(s) is down, that doesn't mean the fight is over. You have no idea if there's an accomplice around the corner who's about to start shooting. Reloading a dry gun means that for however long it takes to reload you are out of luck. Reloading a gun that still has a round in the chamber, though, allows you to, at least, fire a round back.

Also, you should have the replacement magazine in hand and near the butt of the pistol before you drop the magazine. If you're reaching to reload with a round or two or three remaining in the magazine, then you're still able to engage as I mentioned above. You don't want to drop your magazine and those last couple of rounds and then have to reach for your reload. Have the reload ready, drop the magazine, insert the reload and you're ready to go.

That's one way. When I practice this type of drop I stick it in my back pocket instead of letting it drop to the floor. This way you don't have to rack and you also have a backup round or too if you need it.
The problem with pulling it and putting in your back pocket, instead of just letting it drop, is that if you ever find yourself in a situation where you need to reload and get back in the game immediately, like there's another bad guy shooting or heading your way, you'll be slowed down by your training because you'll put the magazine in your back pocket and then reach for your reload.

Remember, you'll fight as you train. I forget where I read the story or who told it, and I think anyone who shoots has probably heard it at some point, but there was a police department that required everyone to police their brass on the range (LA maybe?) during training. This was back in the revolver days. After reloading, the officers would put their fired brass in their pocket. There was a gun fight and all of the officers (3 I think) were killed. In each of their pockets, was all of their fired brass. Despite bullets flying, they stopped and picked up their brass. In the middle of a gun fight, you're going to do what you've trained to do. Drop the magazine, after having the replacement ready to insert in the gun, and let the partially empty one drop. You can pick it up after.
 

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A basic, good mag well is around 20 bucks. that'll help with high speed mag changes. Practice "tap rack and pull" drills and dry fire drills. Snap caps or a snap mag is cheap. As for shooting fast and fast target changes, its like learning a new song on the banjo. Do it slow and right. Ull get faster with practice. Its a mess if it ain't right, but once u get up to speed, its ding-ding ding-ding ding-ding. :))
 
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