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From a purely experiential perspective and ignoring the cost factor, would you recommend a new reloader to start on a single stage press even if the reloader knows he'll move to a progressive press eventually?

I saw a YouTube video in which the presenter suggested everyone start on a single stage in order to learn the basics, especially in regards to setting and tuning the dies. An added benefit, he said, was that the single stage press could be useful for specific applications even after a progressive was purchased.

What do you think of this? I'm sure there's something to be learned by doing it this way but I'm wondering how much value there is in this sort of "apprenticeship" and whether you think a new reloader like myself could just as easily cut my teeth on a progressive, which is where I'm leaning.
 

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I have only ever used a single stager, can't seem to justify the cost of upgrading to myself.

When starting out, in a single you run the risk of damaging only one case/round in the event of an error. In a progressive, it could easily be multiple cases/rounds that then fall into the bin with the good ones...and now the hunt begins to find the bad ones.

My opinion is that for the serious future bulk reloader, jump into a progressive. For the finicky "I want each round to be perfect" then set your sights on a single stager.

That is my opinion and mine alone and does not reflect the views or opinions of GlockForum or any representative thereof.

Cheers!
 

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I think a single stage press is probably the best way to start out since you mess up less ammo if you do something wrong. Other then loading ammo for Caswell's Shooting Range(we used Dillon 1050's) I've only loaded on a single stage.
Even after you get a progressive you can still find a lot of uses for a good single stage press so they're always handy to have around.
 

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I think a single stage press is probably the best way to start out since you mess up less ammo if you do something wrong. Other then loading ammo for Caswell's Shooting Range(we used Dillon 1050's) I've only loaded on a single stage.
Even after you get a progressive you can still find a lot of uses for a good single stage press so they're always handy to have around.
Super good advice above. I just moved to a Hornady Lock n Load however still have many uses for the old single stage....especially for rifle loading.
 

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Specifically, you're referring to using a single stage for precision powder charges and mixing up your own "recipes"?
Case Forming, sizing cast bullets with the Lee Sizing Die lots of other "odd jobs" that you'd not want to set up a progressive press for.
It all comes down to a matter of time. If you shoot a lot and don't have much time then eventually a good progressive will be the way to go. If(like me) you don't shoot that much and have more time on your hands then you know what to do with then you can load on a single stage without much fuss. I find it relaxing to go out into the garage and sit for an hour or two and load up a couple hundred rounds.
Like I said, I do everything in steps. Clean my brass, size and deprime, flare/bell the cases, prime and then finally when I get bullets cast and ready to go I can load then clean the excess lube off of the bullets and box up my ammo.
I've still got around 400 cases primed and ready to load, just need to cast a few more bullets and I'll be "good to go" then it'll just be a matter of playing catch up with whatever I shoot up which isn't all that hard to do if you stay organized. ;)
 

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Specifically, you're referring to using a single stage for precision powder charges and mixing up your own "recipes"?
I'll still use the single stage exclusivly for rifle reloading or small custom load recipies (experimental) for pistol. As said before, they still have a use even with a progressive on hand.....bullet pulling, cast bullet sizing, rifle loading....etc.

I do everything in large batches with a single stage. It just makes the whole process more efficient.

IMO, it's better to learn on a singe stage before going to a progressive..
 
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