Smooth grips or stippled

Discussion in 'Glock Forum' started by wildbill45, Nov 12, 2017.

  1. wildbill45

    wildbill45 Active Member

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    I have noticed that shooters today love the agitated plastic grips, stippled some call it I believe, and even pay others to use a soldering iron to make it more so ... for a fee of course, for a fee. This activity appears to be one of trending things today in the word of shooting and forums, tantamount to the Navy 'around the scuttlebutt' gossip.

    Sticky grips are excellent for play, target shooting, and range gun activities, but, and there always is a but in life, I am dubious about such grippy grips in combat when the main gun is the so mentioned customized grip type. The advantage of a smooth grip in the stressful shooting where the score kept is who is dead and who is not, the ability to change your grip while drawing and shooting is a great thing! If under speed while looking down the barrel of a saw-offed shotgun or .25 auto, you grab your guns grip off the mark, and you are stuck like chuck with that hand position on your gun's rudder until the fight is over. A smooth grip to one who is experienced and expert at gun handling at speed, not a tyro with a loaded gun, can change the grip in motion and be on the spot! This may sound easy, but not so to a lot of owners of guns and various grip styles. Most I would guess have not been taught, and have seen or heard of the technique.

    It may be used more often in wheel guns, due to the inherent grip shape of the design, but a 1911 with smooth grips will benefit from the smooth grip as well for the shooter who can adjust on the fly. This ability is a high-level skill in close quarter combat with so many variables and unknowns to calculate and adjust for in a short period, all the while the gun has to be under control, steady, balanced and able to put a bullet(s) where you want them to go. There are No do-overs as in competition or shooting for fun.

    Does anyone else like and have experience changing the grip as you are in motion, if needed to make the shot, and have you done it at speed? Most folks, even experienced shooters have rarely done it in defense of life, but some have. It is not like picking up a gun and getting a GOOD GRIP ON IT, and firing a shot at a standing still target, NO! It is like grabbing your gun from under your clothing, getting a grip as you pull it from your holster while you hear the suspect breathing as he runs directly at you, knife in hand, no one on your back, you do not get a good grip, but now your hands are stuck to the stippled grips like glue, and your hand is nowhere near the beavertail. You have troubling controlling the gun with your hand so low on the grip, and you may be dead by now. It sounds unlikely, but it is not as unlikely as you may think if you have never been tested at speed and under severe stress.

    Something to think about and work on at least. My grips back in the day were Jordan Troopers and were on my invincible S&W model 19, .357 mag. I also had a set on my Model 29 S&W .44 mag, which I carried on duty at one time, handloaded with Keith 250 grain semi-wadcutters. The grips on the model 19 were broken a few times, and repaired, by me, as the Jordan holster, which had zero retention and a snap strap, and if not appropriately snapped, which occurred a few times as the suspect took off, and I took off as well. The bouncing S&W 19 of course had no choice but to hit the pavement. Photos of my damaged grips are included.
     

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    Last edited: Nov 13, 2017
  2. GARRIGA

    GARRIGA Well-Known Member

    Is stippling really that grippy? My Glocks are stock with stock stippling. Does going Mad Max with the soldering iron make it more sticky? Like adding Stickum?
     

  3. PattonWasRight

    PattonWasRight Well-Known Member

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    What you propose to me is to give greater weight to the possible/maybe case of needing to change your grip and the impact stippling may have on that, versus the case of wanting to get more friction/sure contact when you draw your gun, which is every time it comes out of the holster.

    I don't see the "maybe" outweighing the definitely

    Plus, if there's anything else in play ... rain, sweat, cold, blood which is slick as heck, we'd be at a disadvantage if have a smoother grip
     
  4. wildbill45

    wildbill45 Active Member

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    I do not propose anything to you, what you do is your business. Just putting out there what I do, and believe me walking a beat all year around with my gun out in the weather and not concealed and protected from mother nature, I did actually get cold, wet, and covered in blood (not my blood luckily), my grips were not a disadvantage, but a plus to me. I have no thoughts on how you would handle it, just putting it out there. My guns today are not smooth due to the models I now own. I am not one to keep all my guns, so times change and so do my guns. I may go back smooth on my 1911 for the above reasons. CCW grips are usually protected, and the grips are dry, but duty guns are usually not protected when on the streets or on a call.
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2017
  5. CDR_Glock

    CDR_Glock Active Member

    I adapt to any gun I have. I do like Stippling for the control I feel.

    Smooth grips aren’t really something I enjoy. I only have one pistol that has smooth grips: Wilson CQB with Mammoth ivory grips.

    I HAD smooth grips on my Coonan 357 but switched them to a star pattern G10 set.
     
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  6. 686ssr

    686ssr Well-Known Member

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    Do you have pictures?
     
  7. CDR_Glock

    CDR_Glock Active Member

    Which pistol?

    Here’s the Coonan.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. 686ssr

    686ssr Well-Known Member

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    Both :)..Your Wilson with ivory and your Coonan which looks Awesome by the way!

    Here is my 357 Coonan. pix130006751.jpg
     
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  9. CDR_Glock

    CDR_Glock Active Member

    [​IMG]

    Here’s my Wilson CQB
     
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  10. 686ssr

    686ssr Well-Known Member

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    That is a fine looking Wilson CQB :cool:
    Thanks for showing her!
     
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  11. blue_dot_glock

    blue_dot_glock New Member

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    i've heard that stippled grips build up dead skin and stink after a while
     
  12. wildbill45

    wildbill45 Active Member

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    My CQB had stock grips when I sold it.
     
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  13. wildbill45

    wildbill45 Active Member

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    Gross, but probably true over time, considering the smelly men on the streets who use them most often in training and carrying, working the streets in the summer is a smelly deal!!!