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Discussion Starter #1
When replacing an empty mag with a fully loaded mag, the slide shuts on its own...what the hell?
 

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If the slide stop does not release when you slowly insert a magazine and click in place, slowly, then it is the force of the mag insertion.

While the slide release may eventually wear down (it is after all a mechanical part), it takes an awful lot of lock/release cycles to do so before it wears to the point that it does not reliably detain the slide.

Does this happen with both full and empty magazines?
 

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This happens with many semi-autos, not just Glocks, and in my experience is always a combo of a full mag, with a good strong mag spring, and a forceful mag insertion. As the mag spring wears, and/or you use less force inserting the mag, it'll stop doing it.
 

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It is part of the glock design as prescribed by the Austrian requirements it was made to fit...

It is not an issue, if anything it will decrease your reload time...

Most semiautos do this when smacked hard enough to seat the mag.
 

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It is part of the glock design as prescribed by the Austrian requirements it was made to fit...

It is not an issue, if anything it will decrease your reload time...

Most semiautos do this when smacked hard enough to seat the mag.
blackwolffcf nailed it on the head.
 

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Yep, nothing to be concerned with, all of my Glocks have done this with a slightly varied amount of force used upon inserting the ful mag. I've never had the slide go forward without picking up a round so I see it as an added bonus on reload time.
 

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My Beretta 96D did it since day one.

And this is a bad thing? I loved it.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Well its not a bad thing...It just started doing it. Thought I would see what the masses have to say...Thanks all
 

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It is part of the glock design as prescribed by the Austrian requirements it was made to fit...
I'm still waiting to see some documentation of this...as said in one of the many threads on this topic, if this is really a "feature" then there are an awful lot of "defective" Glocks out there that fail to do this, including just about every one I've fired. Some do, some don't.
 

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I'm still waiting to see some documentation of this...as said in one of the many threads on this topic, if this is really a "feature" then there are an awful lot of "defective" Glocks out there that fail to do this, including just about every one I've fired. Some do, some don't.
It was posted in the last thread, not my issue if you still don't believe it.

Glocks that don't release the slide when a mag is slammed is not defective at all, it is just a tight slide release spring. These 100% work as guided by the Austrian military's requirement to allow when impacted against a hard object with a strong down and back motion to release the spring.
 

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Well its not a bad thing...It just started doing it. Thought I would see what the masses have to say...Thanks all
The Tennifer finish makes the side material harder than the soft steel the Slide Stop Lever(SSL) is made of. The SSL wears faster and yours has reached it's limit (if you do not want this action to continue).

Simply replace the SSL with a new one, and use the Sling Shot method of pulling the slide reward to load your first round. This will help slow the wear on the new SSL. Using the SSL as a thumb release for the slide helps create the issue you have.
 

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It was posted in the last thread, not my issue if you still don't believe it.

Glocks that don't release the slide when a mag is slammed is not defective at all, it is just a tight slide release spring. These 100% work as guided by the Austrian military's requirement to allow when impacted against a hard object with a strong down and back motion to release the spring.
Here is the list of requirements:

The criteria for the Austrian replacement pistol were:


  • The design has to be self-loading.
  • The pistol must fire the NATO-standard 9×19mm Parabellum round.
  • The magazines would not require any means of assistance for loading.
  • The magazines must have a minimum capacity of 8 rounds.
  • All actions necessary to prepare the pistol for firing and any actions required after firing must be done single-handed, either right- or left-handed.
  • The pistol must be absolutely secure against accidental discharge from shock, stroke and drops from a height of 2 meters onto a steel plate.
  • Disassembly of the main parts for maintenance and reassembling must be possible without the use of any tools.
  • Maintenance and cleaning of the pistol must be accomplished without the use of tools.
  • The pistol's construction may not exceed 58 individual parts (equivalent of a P38).
  • Gauges, measuring and precise testing devices must not be necessary for the long-term maintenance of the pistol.
  • The manufacturer is required to provide the Ministry of Defence with a complete set of engineering drawings and exploded views. These must be supplied with all the relevant details for the production of the pistol.
  • All components must be fully interchangeable between pistols.
  • No more than 20 malfunctions are permitted during the first 10,000 rounds fired, not even minor jams that can be cleared without the use of any tools.
  • After firing 15,000 rounds of standard ammunition, the pistol will be inspected for wear. The pistol will then be used to fire an overpressure test cartridge generating 5,000 bar (500 MPa; 73,000 psi) (the normal maximum operating pressure Pmax for the 9 mm NATO is rated at 2,520 bar (252 MPa; 36,500 psi).[7] The critical components must continue to function properly and be up to specifications, otherwise the pistol will be disqualified.
  • When handled properly, under no circumstances may the user be endangered by case ejection.
  • The muzzle energy must be at least 441.5 J when firing a 9mm S-round/P-08 Hirtenberger AG.
  • Pistols scoring less than 70% of the total available points will not be considered for military use.
I don't see anything about the slide closing by inserting the magazine forcefully. The only two that could possibly be misinterpreted to make this claim are:

The magazines would not require any means of assistance for loading.
This refers to loading the magazine, as in inserting rounds. Even if it applied to loading the gun, it would mean inserting it into the gun; it says nothing about charging the weapon.

All actions necessary to prepare the pistol for firing and any actions required after firing must be done single-handed, either right- or left-handed.
This one would, obviously, apply to charging the weapon. Doing this one handed, via release of the slide via the slide lock, would be accomplishing this "single handed".
 

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I have no idea if it's intended to do this or not, but I know every glock I've owned or shot have done it. Some have required a little more force upon inserting than others, some did not do it every time, and some only did it after a 'break in' period, but in the end they all did slide forward when a heavy hand was used inserting a fresh mag.
 

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None of my Glock pistols close when a loaded magazine is inserted. I just tried "banging home" a loaded mag in my 17 & 21 and the slide remained in the open position in each case.
 
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