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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I put my Springfield 1911 through its paces at the gun club Friday and I was pretty disappointed with how I did. I suspect it was a combination of factors: I had spent a good chunk before firing a Glock 30 before I shot the 1911. I have not had a good work out with my SA 1911 in a month or so.

But, I have to say, for whatever reason and I'm still not sure why, though I suspect it has mostly to do with sight picture differences, I consistently shoot my Ruger SR1911 more accurately.

Anyway, here's a video of the session, as always, I welcome your critiques and constructive criticism. I think I'm still getting too much finger on the trigger.

[ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=awmJ7cDFHag[/ame]
 

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I am not being negative here but since you asked for advice...

You are right, you have a bit too much on the trigger. But the biggest issue I see is support hand. You should have a tad more "wrap" with the thumb slightly forward more. (This takes a bit too get used to.) Strong hand = firm handshake support hand - solid rearward pressure When you have the solid grip you will not have to "reset" your grip. I am not sure if I am explaining this correctly.

I stole this picture from a Todd Jarret webpage. His grip is pretty much the standard and does not move (or regrip) as he is shooting.
 

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You shouldn't put rearward pressure with your support hand it creates a bigger arch of movement. It's only used to support not squeeze the grip.
 

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You shouldn't put rearward pressure with your support hand it creates a bigger arch of movement. It's only used to support not squeeze the grip.
That's funny, just about every tactical and defensive handgun class teaches this. Check websites and books and you will see almost the same thing taught. To quote one such article...

When firing the gun the strong arm should be stiff, with the support hand pulling back slightly against the shooting hand. This push-pull action steadies the hands and wrists and gives a strong aiming platform for firing the handgun. This is an extremely strong style of grip and for non-competitive shooters it is a grip that will serve you well for life.

Todd Jarret on the subject... He is one of the best semi auto handgun shooters in the world.

http://cheaperthandirt.com/blog/?p=3977
 

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You can do what works best for you, but in my NRA training coarse we were told not to apply pressure backward with the support hand. And it says the same thing in the NRA training book.
 

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You should re read your attachment it's says the support hand apples pressure to the left and right of the grip...
 

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I understand that. That is why I included the top quote. It is a push pull relationship. I included the link because it also illustrated that the support hand does far more than just support the strong hand. (60/40) The original poster asked for input. I gave input based on many hours of training with tactical instructors. Some of which are top competitors. One in particular survived a firefight while on duty by "stopping the threat". He is an excellent instructor. I don't claim to be the end all of shooters, quite the opposite. But I am a pretty good student and I train a lot to overcome my lack of natural ability. It is amazing how many people shoot "low left" but don't want to hear how to fix it. Techniques and tactics evolve. An instructor may teach what they learned 20 years ago. Stance has changed a ton in the last 30 years. (mostly due to modern ballistc vests) Reminds me of a saying that we used to joke about with other dog trainers. The only thing you can get two dog trainers to agree about is what the third is doing wrong. You can utilize my advice or don't.
 

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Once again, nice vid, and thanks for putting yourself out there, "warts & all", so to say.

I'll just give you my impressions, right or wrong isn't an issue, and no critique junk. You and I are at opposite ends in some ways. Your hands are much bigger than mine, like way bigger, so you have to find a home for all that meat as it wraps around a single stack. My natural grip on a 1911 is considerably lower than yours. Watching you got me to thinking, so I just picked up my Series 80 to check, & snapped a couple of pics. There is no way I can do my natural grip, and get my strong hand thumb up over the safety. Without shifting everything. I naturally grip way lower.

I went back to watch the vid you posted on the WWII Springfield, just to check. Because that's what I learned to shoot on, except for mine was a WWII Colt. You seemed to gravitate towards a naturally high grip on that one too, and shifted your grip a couple of times, trying to find a home for that big thumb on your strong hand, either over the safety, or under.

So, we both naturally differ on our grip height with 1911's. I also learned how to shoot offhand, with my left hand tucked behind me. I never used a supporting hand grip, or two hand grip, until a few years ago. Not unless I was shooting Magnums anyway, or double stack mag pistols. So to this day, my knee jerk reaction on drawing a pistol, is to one hand it.

I took a couple of snaps of my natural grip, it's lower than yours, and my thumb lines up with the trigger, & trigger finger, on the opposite side. When I look down my arm, the hammer lines up with the center of the inside of my elbow, and the frame of the pistol lines up with the main bone in my fore arm. My thumb knuckle & trigger finger knuckle are on the same level in relation to the pistol, and at a 90 degree angle to the pistol frame. That's what I see when I draw, aim & fire, with full extension. If I use a two hand grip, it comes in lower of course, and my thumb ends up touching the frame about where it meets the trigger guard. Sorry, I couldn't take a pic, no hand free to work the camera.

Glad you posted both the vids, they're fun to watch, and I do appreciate them. I think you might have just been a bit frazzled from the previous shooting, we all do better when we're fresh in the morning. Not bad shooting all in all, switching pistols in midstream can throw anybody off a tad.

Thanks for the vids, all good fun, keep 'em coming. & here's pics of my grip, with my small hands.



 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Wow, that was really interesting, thanks for taking the time to post all that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for all the comments guys, that photo of Jarett makes me really to work on my grip a lot more than shooting the 1911. Can't wait to get it back out to the gun club now.
 

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Wow, that was really interesting, thanks for taking the time to post all that.
Some pretty darn good members here , hey??
 

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Wow, that was really interesting, thanks for taking the time to post all that.

No problem, & your welcome. Just some observations about our differences really. I'm about typed out today, so it must be time to go get in some shooting before dark.

Thanks again for the vids.
 
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