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I just got this kit from LA Police Gear. In addition to what is listed in the index, got 3 tourniquets (RATS Gen 2 from amazon), two Israeli bandages (Amazon), and quick clot (Amazon).

I am new to all this, signed up for a course to get practical hands on training. Not really sure how to best organize all this.


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More important than kit is training! Let's say someone has a sucking chest wound, I would rather have a doritos bag and a piece of tape AND know what to do with it than have a proper chest seal and no idea whatsoever of how to apply it.
Yeah, the training. I think you nailed it, I plan to get serious about this. My employer provides for CPR training but I want to take it beyond that and get hands on training on how to deal with gun shot wounds etc., using the stuff I have. It's just like having an arsenal of guns but never train with it. How do you know how to use it when the sh** hits the fan?
 

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Added these to my first aid kit. Israeli compression bandages and naloxone hydrochloride (Narcan) to treat an opioid overdose. The nalaxone is covered by my health insurance, cost me nothing. You might want to consider adding it to your kit as well, not so much for yourself but to help a friend or really anyone. Could make the difference between life and death, especially if it takes more than a few minutes for the medics to arrive after you call 911. Easy to administer and it won't do harm even if you are not sure whether someone passed out because of an OD or another cause, according to my pharmacist. The opioids crisis is real, and it's not just in big cities (West Virginia, Ohio, you name it).


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Now here's something you may not have considered adding to your kit: an AED or automated external defibrillator. These are expensive but they may save someone's life, especially if you are in a remote area and the ambulance can't get to the patient quickly. Watch the video below by Warrior Poet Society, someone who was in rifle training had a heart attack. Two paramedic students who took the class as well were able to save him, they happened to have an AED in their car. Quite a story!

 

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im actually surprised they dont make people pass a stress test before doing it
You mean, make people who want to take a rifle class, pass a stress test? I'm not sure how you would do that ... this was a 60 year old male who seemed healthy and was able to do drills, run, etc.

You never really know what could happen. My dad had a heart attack back in 1996, while staying with my brother and his wife and kids, in the South of France. He shared a bedroom with one of the kids, who was still very young at the time. Kid woke up crying around 3 am, which in turn woke up my dad and my brother. That was fortuitous because a little bit later, my dad had to sit down complaining of chest pain that radiated through his arm. Before you know it he passed out. Brother calls 911 (actually 112, the European equivalent) and 2 minutes later the local French fire department medics came rushing to their holiday home (God bless them). They had to rescuscitate him twice with a defibrillator before they could get to the ER. He had no prior heart health history. Things happen.
 
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