Rubber Band Guns- A super cool story.

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by Shooter, Dec 9, 2011.

  1. Shooter

    Shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    I was raised around firearms, my Dad was a LEO as where all my "Uncles" and my Grandparent owned a gun store and where constantly on the road going to gun shows. A little history to set the mood.

    In my Tenth year on Christmas my Grandparents came over and had a box five foot in length. My grandfather gave me a wink, letting me know this was mine. I was excited as big boxes were a rarity from grandparents, they liked to give me socks and underwear, but this time is was something different (a rubber band gun if you don't know where this is headed due to the title).

    We got done with dinner and I anxiously awaited the box, being forced to open the lesser presents first, each with an exasperated sense of disappointment as they were socks and under wear.

    Then came the big box, I tore that thing open like a ... like a... I got nothing but it was quick and lo and behold a five M16 rubber band gun that held 25 shots at one time. It had one of those spinning wheels that allowed multiple bands and it came with a "going to hurt someone" quality of rubber-bands you just don't get from newspapers any more (the only other source of rubber bands I know of to this day).

    It clearly said on the gun "Not for use by persons under the age of 16, DO NOT POINT AT PEOPLE". It's unfortunate, at the time I didn't understand capslock equaled a direct command (Thanks internet!) so I loaded it up eagerly and started going to town on the boxes that where being discarded as my siblings continued to open their socks and underwear with sighs.

    My siblings are much younger than me, and I was a jerk of a kid.

    My Brother came into my site, knowing this was a rubber-band gun, and having already been taught gun safety and allowed to roam with the .22 I was given the year before, I took aim, this was something different in my mind, this was only a rubber band gun.

    Tap, tap, tap. "Screeeeeeeeeaaaaam", my brother hit the floor. Lucky for me (and him I suppose) I was about the size of my gun and it had dropped hitting him in the legs and forcing him to drop.

    It was a couple of years before I got that gun back, and a couple of months till I was allowed possession of a firearm.

    The next year we all got marshmallow shooters.

    My Brother is one of if not my best friend... now that we are adults.
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2011
  2. Mapcinq

    Mapcinq New Member

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    Great story. I had a wooden rubber band pistol when I was younger, loved the thing. I had bought it a local fair, where the seller had a large rubber band machine gun. I would have loved to have that when I was a kid.
     

  3. Shooter

    Shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    I had a few of those too. They all ended up getting broken. When you are carrying them on you bicycle and fall they break.
     
  4. jfirecops

    jfirecops New Member

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    I purchased my Dad a pistol version of those as a gag gift one Christmas, then I learned the gag was on me when he ignored the warning stickers and decided I was the only target he was willing to shoot.
     
  5. rivalarrival

    rivalarrival Are we there yet?

    A couple years back, my family passed out little PVC marshmallow shooters. Us bigger "kids" decided to get to work with spare plumbing parts in the basement to make big-kid versions of the little-kid blow guns they passed out.

    We took a large "tank" made of 4" pvc, a short piece of pipe for a barrel, and installed 3 valves between the two. (elbowed over for compact-ness) The first valve was the breech-block - we drilled a hole in the side of it to load a mini marshmallow. The second valve was the firing valve; it sealed off the charge chamber - a 6" piece of barrel pipe - and released the charge to the barrel. The third valve separated the charge chamber from the reservoir, a large piece of 4" pipe. To fire, you'd load the marshmallow and close the breech block, close the firing valve, open and close the charge valve to fill the charge chamber, then open the firing valve. We were able to get about 15 shots before needing to recharge the reservoir.


    But I digress... We also had a previously built "carrot" gun with an 8-foot barrel. Smaller than a potato cannon, the barrel was about perfect for a regular-sized marshmallow. I shot my brother in the leg from about 10 feet away; he showed me a fist-sized bruise a few days later, about 7 seconds before he lit me up with his paintball gun. :)
     
  6. Shooter

    Shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Sounds like my dad.

    A marshmallow did that or a carrot?
     
  7. rivalarrival

    rivalarrival Are we there yet?

    Marshmallow. Regular-sized marshmallow, through an 8-foot barrel, charged from a 6-foot section of 4" PVC filled with air at ~140PSI... Yeah, air cannons are not to be trifled with. Our baseball gun lobbed baseballs on washcloth wadding almost 300 yards down range. Could easily shatter bones.

    A carrot probably would have lodged in his leg.

    Our mini cannons were much safer. You could feel the hit, but they didn't bruise or draw welts... unless you crammed the barrel full of marshmallows, "forgot" to close the middle valve and dumped the entire reservoir into the shot... :)
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2011
  8. Shooter

    Shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    That's nuts. Was the marshmallow intact?
     
  9. rivalarrival

    rivalarrival Are we there yet?

    A little smooshed, but basically intact, yeah. It was at very close range, two or three feet from the barrel. I couldn't believe it - if I'd known how much energy it could impart, I wouldn't have shot him with it. Air cannons deserve a fair bit of respect. :)
     
  10. Shooter

    Shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    That they do, I'm sure that's one of the reasons they are illegal.
     
  11. Shooter

    Shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    No other time travelers?
     
  12. rivalarrival

    rivalarrival Are we there yet?

    [Citation Needed]

    I've yet to find any laws restricting pneumatic cannons in Ohio. Obviously, people can do stupid things with them that would be illegal, but I've yet to find anything saying they are generally illegal. They aren't federally regulated either.

    Several states consider combustion-type spud guns to be firearms; Ohio isn't one of them and I'm referring to pneumatic, not combustion.
     
  13. jfirecops

    jfirecops New Member

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    I could be wrong, but I was once told that spudguns falls under ATF jurisdiction since it is a explosion that propels the projectile.
     
  14. SxEdRuMmEr

    SxEdRuMmEr New Member

    No gun needed

    I once hit and killed a fly with a rubber band. I used that little make-a-handgun-with-your-thumb-and-forefinger method. Very "Top Shot" worthy. Made me think of Pat Morita, catching them with chopsticks.

    Cool story though, reminded me of getting my first rifle, a Winchester 1890 "boy's rifle." Wasn't even wrapped though, just had a bow on it, as I'm sure the box was lost by my grandfather, its first owner. The ammo was wrapped though, didn't take long to find after a quick shake. Only noteworthy Christmas present I ever got from my dad.
     
  15. rivalarrival

    rivalarrival Are we there yet?

    Well, perhaps the Nuclear Regulatory Commission should regulate my spud guns since they are nuclear powered, not combustion-based. (nuclear > steam > electricity > air compressor) :D

    The ATF stated:
    I suppose since I used marshmallows and carrots instead of potatoes in that particular cannon, I might have converted it to a "destructive device" :D

    No, the ATF doesn't regulate spud guns, pumpkin guns, or cannons used for similar purposes any more than they regulate paintball guns.
     
  16. jfirecops

    jfirecops New Member

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    Thanks for the info, so as long as I do not shoot someone, We are ok.
     
  17. Model22

    Model22 Vulgar Individual

    My first projectile weapon was a wrist rocket. My grandpa gave it to me to rob squirrels of our bird feed up in Oregon. Needless to say, stainless ball bearings do a hell of a job of population control on critters. Them damn rabbits didn't have a chance at Ol' Grampa's garden what so ever.
     
  18. chefrdw

    chefrdw New Member

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    back to the future..

    This thread most likely brings back allot of memories for some us.. I doubt most of my kids generation has never seen a rubber band or potato gun..
     
  19. jfirecops

    jfirecops New Member

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    Yep, most of them are too busy playing video games. No more bottle rocket wars or the old Daisy single cock bb guns (the original air soft :D) or any of the fun things we did growing up
     
  20. Shooter

    Shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Mine will. All the stuff I had fin with I'm making sure they get.

    Next gun show I'm finding my four year old something she can handle.

    I got her a cork gun for Christmas and she doesn't have the upper body strength to pop it yet.

    I'm just using it to scare her mother when I'm sneaking around the house.