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So I got some ammo for home defense. A box of 20 Cor-Bon 90 grain something or other (they're at home, I'm at work now). They were recommended by someone working at my local gun shop.

So I filled up one of my Glock 19 magazines with this ammo & placed it with my gun in the safe I have. How long before I rotate that ammo out of that magazine with fresh ammo?

Thanks!
 

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Here's a response from another forum. I've personally never felt a need to rotate ammo on any kind of regular schedule. I inspect it regularly, but unless there's some reason to change it, I don't. I've personally fired 10 year old ammo without a problem.

Please read as it will save you some money!!

I will address here what should be common knowledge on proper storage of ammunition in the home. It seems from reading various forums that some folks have been given the wrong information, or haven't given much thought as to how to store their ammunition. This will also give some ideas about proper rotation of ammunition that is used on an everyday basis.

OK, before I get started, a little about my background. I have served as a military and civilian Quality Assurance and Surviellance specialist for ammunition and explosives. I have over 20+ years in this field. I don't claim to be the worlds expert at this, but feel that the knowledge I have may benefit some here.

First we will start off with classification of small arms, powders, and components.
1. Small arms ammunition using smokeless powders are classed as a 1.4 fire hazard, which means that even contained inside a ammo can will be very unlikely to explode when exposed to fire. Proper storage inside a home should be someplace away from direct heat, yet stored in such a way to provide air to circulate, one inch or so around large containers is deemed sufficiant. Try not to dogpile your stock.
2. Powder. Smokeless powder that is lose(not loaded) is classed as a 1.3 class. Usually it will not explode but burn. Try to store it seperate from all other components, primers, heat source, and such. If your powders can be contained inside of ammocans ensure you place dessicant bags in the can to help with humidity issues.
2a. BlackPowder. I don't care what you've been told, it is and always has been classed as an explosive, doesn't matter the amount. Its classed as a Low Explosive, and carries the hazard class of 1.1. This if possible should be stored outside of the home. If not possible try to store it somewhere its the least likely to come into contact with a heat source, and where its the least likely to do the most damage to the home(like your garage, place it near the farthest wall from the inside of the home). It should be stored in its own container, in some type of ammocan and should have some type of barracade around it. As little as five pounds can do alot of damage to a house.
3. Primers. Primers rate a 1.4 class as do small arms. Storage should be the same as your ammo, and use dessicant if possible.

Rotation! OK, the majority of your ammunition doesn't need to be rotated every month, six months, or even a year!! Remember these companies for the most part produce ammunition for the military. This ammo sits for years before use, and its always the policy to use the oldest first. The military doesn't store their ammo in nice warm/air conditioned homes, its sits in warehouses, magazines, and outdoor storage, or issued to troops where its exposed to some of the worst extreams known, and it works! So your ammo is going to last along time, even what you have in your carrygun/HD gun, at the worst, unless your standing outside everyday allday, is only going to be in the element for a very short period. Its not going to go bad over night, or in six months. At the least rotate every year, yet you could go longer! I've seen and inspected ammunition/small arms thats been sitting in bunkers/magazines and other places thats older than most people on this board, and its still looks like the day it left the factory. Remember too this was made on the lowest bid, not your top dollar defensive ammo.
http://www.waltherforums.com/forum/free-range-time/21972-ammunition-storage-rotation.html
 

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Thanks Jonm61. This was informative. I was wondering the same thing about rotating HD ammos. Maybe I'll buy new HD ammos every year, like New Years or 4th of July, just so I remember. :)
 

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The only thing ive been practicing after finally having my first experience with "set back", is if I chamber the same round at home a few times then I make sure its the first one fired at the next range visit before moving on with my range ammo.

I used to rechamber the same round countless times then luckily I noticed one got way shorter.

Other than that I may fire off ammo that's been carried maybe once a year. If it hasnt been carried I dont worry at all about how long its stored.
 

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Mike P said:
The only thing ive been practicing after finally having my first experience with "set back", is if I chamber the same round at home a few times then I make sure its the first one fired at the next range visit before moving on with my range ammo.

I used to rechamber the same round countless times then luckily I noticed one got way shorter.

Other than that I may fire off ammo that's been carried maybe once a year. If it hasnt been carried I dont worry at all about how long its stored.
Interesting. Noticeable to the naked eye??
 

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Interesting. Noticeable to the naked eye??
On the one instance, yes. That round had been re-chambered probably 50 times.

I always carry to full capacity so when I mess with my guns at home I will stick the same round back on top of the mag to re chamber, remove mag and top it back off. Now days I do as I stated above so my carry mags are on a very very slow rotation of one round per range trip.
 

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Mike P said:
On the one instance, yes. That round had been re-chambered probably 50 times.

I always carry to full capacity so when I mess with my guns at home I will stick the same round back on top of the mag to re chamber, remove mag and top it back off. Now days I do as I stated above so my carry mags are on a very very slow rotation of one round per range trip.
Good to know I will have to keep that in mind thanks Mike
 

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On the one instance, yes. That round had been re-chambered probably 50 times.

I always carry to full capacity so when I mess with my guns at home I will stick the same round back on top of the mag to re chamber, remove mag and top it back off. Now days I do as I stated above so my carry mags are on a very very slow rotation of one round per range trip.
By any chance do you know if this is only cause by loading and unloading the same round? Will it happen if a round is left in the chamber for long periods of time?

Cause I do what you do as in chamber a round then top off the mag but I haven't been to the range in about 4 to 5 months so there has been a round in the chamber ready to go for that long.
 

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Certainly not worth the risk. And gunner not being a smart ass or anything but if at home couldn't you check your round?
 

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Certainly not worth the risk. And gunner not being a smart ass or anything but if at home couldn't you check your round?

Just wanted to know others people views on the subject but good point.

Edit: from reading what Mike P just posted below me, I do not own any calipers at this time so if it is that small of a difference, my eyes (I wear contacts to see) probably would not have picked up that small of a difference.
 

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By any chance do you know if this is only cause by loading and unloading the same round? Will it happen if a round is left in the chamber for long periods of time?

Cause I do what you do as in chamber a round then top off the mag but I haven't been to the range in about 4 to 5 months so there has been a round in the chamber ready to go for that long.
I'm no expert but I seriously doubt it. My educated guess tells me set back is caused from the forward motion of going up the ramp.

For a long long time I used to debunk the idea of set back to myself, not ever worrying about it then I had it happen. I did not measure the round because at that time my batteries were dead in my calipers. It wasn't much, I've seen examples of way worse on line. Because of my career my eyes have been trained to notice very small differences in things even w/o measuring devices and attention to detail. What caught my eye that day was the amount of bullet sticking out past the case right before the bevel{Critical Defense}. I looked twice then thought hmmmm so I took it out and compared to rounds that were still new unused in the box and then it was plain as day. It may have been okay to fire......who knows but I threw it away regardless

:cool:.
 

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Set back won't happen from just leaving the round in the chamber. It takes the force of being chambered to push the bullet back into the case. Most of the good HP manufacturers are crimping them so they won't move back. You can see the ring just below the bullet on the case when they've done that.
 

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Most of the good HP manufacturers are crimping them so they won't move back. You can see the ring just below the bullet on the case when they've done that.
I know that's why I never ever used to give it second thought. The one I had it happen to was a Critical Defense.
 

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I was always taught in the academy to rotate your carry ammo every year. That's what I do. Once a year I take my carry ammo to the range and unload it and buy new ammo to replace it.
 

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I'm no expert but I seriously doubt it. My educated guess tells me set back is caused from the forward motion of going up the ramp.

For a long long time I used to debunk the idea of set back to myself, not ever worrying about it then I had it happen. I did not measure the round because at that time my batteries were dead in my calipers. It wasn't much, I've seen examples of way worse on line. Because of my career my eyes have been trained to notice very small differences in things even w/o measuring devices and attention to detail. What caught my eye that day was the amount of bullet sticking out past the case right before the bevel{Critical Defense}. I looked twice then thought hmmmm so I took it out and compared to rounds that were still new unused in the box and then it was plain as day. It may have been okay to fire......who knows but I threw it away regardless

:cool:.
Didn't you post about that when it happened?
If so I read it and started swapping the placement of the first round in my mag when I mess with it and have to rechamber. So once it's ejected I put it deeper in the magazine and chamber a "fresh" one. Just an attempt to cut down on how often that round is rechambered. So thanks for that.
 
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