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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey gents- I was doing some research on a new hunting rifle and found an article that said the number one grab was the new Sako S20. Not sure if $1600 is worth it or if anyone has heard good things? Any suggestions on a new setup would be aprecited thanks in advance.
 

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Just about any U.S. made rifle in 30.06', .308, .270, 25.06' or 6.5 Creedmoore will do the job. Wood or synthetic is a personal choice. A quality optic is a must and not a place to skimp on price along with top notch mounts and rings.

One off my primary deer hunting rifles in a pre 64' Mod. 70 Winchester in 30.06' with a Leupold Varix 3iii, 4.5 x 14. The elevation cover was engraved with the data for the pet load, 165 grain Nosler Partition bullets over IMR 4064 and it shoots 1/2 MOA at 100 yards. As a high power competitor, I reload for every caliber that I shoot and the results are more than satisfactory.

Today's rifles and factory ammo can provide the same or a similar level of accuracy for your needs. Good luck and good shooting.
 

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Just about any U.S. made rifle in 30.06', .308, .270, 25.06' or 6.5 Creedmoore will do the job. Wood or synthetic is a personal choice. A quality optic is a must and not a place to skimp on price along with top notch mounts and rings.

One off my primary deer hunting rifles in a pre 64' Mod. 70 Winchester in 30.06' with a Leupold Varix 3iii, 4.5 x 14. The elevation cover was engraved with the data for the pet load, 165 grain Nosler Partition bullets over IMR 4064 and it shoots 1/2 MOA at 100 yards. As a high power competitor, I reload for every caliber that I shoot and the results are more than satisfactory.

Today's rifles and factory ammo can provide the same or a similar level of accuracy for your needs. Good luck and good shooting.
My deer & elk rifle is a Springfield 1903 30-06 with an 18” bull barrel, & a 2 stage Timney trigger. My grandfather built it. It also has my initials engraved on a brass plate on it. My grandfather & I have the same first & last name.
 

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Just about any U.S. made rifle in 30.06', .308, .270, 25.06' or 6.5 Creedmoore will do the job. Wood or synthetic is a personal choice. A quality optic is a must and not a place to skimp on price along with top notch mounts and rings.

One off my primary deer hunting rifles in a pre 64' Mod. 70 Winchester in 30.06' with a Leupold Varix 3iii, 4.5 x 14. The elevation cover was engraved with the data for the pet load, 165 grain Nosler Partition bullets over IMR 4064 and it shoots 1/2 MOA at 100 yards. As a high power competitor, I reload for every caliber that I shoot and the results are more than satisfactory.

Today's rifles and factory ammo can provide the same or a similar level of accuracy for your needs. Good luck and good shooting.
 

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I recently heard about such a gun and looked at various reviews in which many advised or did not advise buying this 12 ga caliber rifle. The opinion of users was divided into two camps and it is very difficult to make a choice, but for me this gun is not very good and I did not like it at all. To be honest, I wouldn't buy such a weapon for a thousand dollars, since I prefer the old models of pump-action shotguns, they are more reliable and more convenient to use. You may disagree with my opinion, but I will not argue with you, since my opinion is subjective and I do not urge you to listen to it. Peace to all!
 

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For a hunting rifle that will get used and likely a few bumps and bruises I wouldn't invest $1600 in the rifle alone. If $1600 is the budget I would look at a $600 gun and a $1000 scope. Caliber would depend on your typical hunting conditions. Long range wide open shots a smaller faster caliber makes sense. Heavy brush and shorter distance a heavier caliber might be the better choice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
For a hunting rifle that will get used and likely a few bumps and bruises I wouldn't invest $1600 in the rifle alone. If $1600 is the budget I would look at a $600 gun and a $1000 scope. Caliber would depend on your typical hunting conditions. Long range wide open shots a smaller faster caliber makes sense. Heavy brush and shorter distance a heavier caliber might be the better choice.
Solid thanks man- seems like a good break down if the price point
 

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Old thread resurrected. There is no such thing as a "brush" caliber. A twig will turn a 338 Lapua enough to generate a miss. Brush guns are typically light, short, and quick handling. The normally use heavy(ish) caliber to compensate for short barrels and to give a good terminal performance from it.
Small and fast isn't all that either. One of the most popular rounds out there today is kinda slow, as it goes. Many of the established rounds have been "modernized" to meet the need for speed, that just isn't all that real.
Yes velocity will shorten flight time, and eliminate some shortcomings, but the shortcomings are still pulling the trigger. Way to many factors to talk about here, that effect flight, but the above isn't all bad.
FWIW, I have never heard a negative about the Sako, other than the price tag. I have a $400 Thompson that I'd put it up against. The Thompson has a lot of features I like, the reason I bought it, but is a tad on the heavy side. Not a deal killer with my rather recent addition of recoil sensitivity.
Since this is so old, have you made your purchase? What did you land with?
 
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