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In photography, there's a book called "Understanding Exposure" that is a recommended standard read for every photographer aiming to move his skills beyond simple point-and-shoot. It should be considered a bible for understanding light manipulation as it applies to photography.

I'm looking for similar information for rifle shooting. Topics should include, but not be limited to, grip/hold, sight alignment, iron sights, scopes, wind-age and elevation, MOA, etc.

What would you recommend for improving rifle shooting technique? Books, websites, videos. I'm not looking for you to do my homework for me -- I've definitely been scouring the web -- rather, I'm hoping to save a little time separating the wheat from the chaff. As we all know, the Internet is full of chaff! For a beginner, it's often difficult to distinguish between the two.

And yes, I do plan to shoot, shoot and shoot some more.

I'll probably take the NRA Basic Rifle course after I put a couple hundred rounds down range in my new rifle. However, I took their Basic Pistol course and wasn't impressed. Front Sight and other high level training will be much further down my timeline. Ideally, I'd love to enroll in the Marine Corps Scout Sniper weekend program... Oh wait, they don't have one! Ha.
 

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GrassHopper
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ROYALE-W-CHEESE said:
In photography, there's a book called "Understanding Exposure" that is a recommended standard read for every photographer aiming to move his skills beyond simple point-and-shoot. It should be considered a bible for understanding light manipulation as it applies to photography.

I'm looking for similar information for rifle shooting. Topics should include, but not be limited to, grip/hold, sight alignment, iron sights, scopes, wind-age and elevation, MOA, etc.

What would you recommend for improving rifle shooting technique? Books, websites, videos. I'm not looking for you to do my homework for me -- I've definitely been scouring the web -- rather, I'm hoping to save a little time separating the wheat from the chaff. As we all know, the Internet is full of chaff! For a beginner, it's often difficult to distinguish between the two.

And yes, I do plan to shoot, shoot and shoot some more.

I'll probably take the NRA Basic Rifle course after I put a couple hundred rounds down range in my new rifle. However, I took their Basic Pistol course and wasn't impressed. Front Sight and other high level training will be much further down my timeline. Ideally, I'd love to enroll in the Marine Corps Scout Sniper weekend program... Oh wait, they don't have one! Ha.
I did the marksmanship team in JROTC for 4 years... got my expert rating...

I suggest joining a shooting club if they are available... Personally I prefer actual people over videos or books... The basic NRA courses are helpful to a degree, but if you want combat training or extreme long distance you are gunna have to spend a pretty penny at a place like front sight.
 

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Magpul has the "Art of the precision rifle" DVD that I really need to watch, but I bought it because it got great reviews. You can find it on eBay. It's a multi volume set that generally runs ~$45.

I'd never really thought about it, but there was an article recently in Guns Magazine about scopes. Pretty much everything that applies to cameras, as far as lens construction, selection, etc., basically everything that relates to light transmission, also applies to scopes, including the terminology. So, if you've got a good foundation there, you'll be better armed to select a scope than the average shooter.
 

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Load Bearing Wall
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