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I couldn't shoot my 45acp(or any other center fire ctg. for that matter) if I didn't reload and cast my own bullets. Once you've got brass and if you cast your own bullets all you'll have into the price of a box of ammo is primers and powder. Powder is about $24 bucks a lb including tax so for a 6.0gr charge you're looking at about .02 cents per round. Primers have gone sky high, last ones I bought cost me $4.40/100 with tax(OUCH!!) so if you do the math you'll be into a 45acp round for about 6.4 cents or $3.20 a box if you cast your own bullets.
If you don't cast your own and have to buy em' then you can add another $45 bucks per 500 plus shipping, say about $13 for "IF it Fits It Ships" shipping by USPS. Most bullet manufactures do it that way so you can actually order up to 2000 45cal bullets and still only pay the $13 for shipping which will help cut costs. Still, if you just get the 500 we'd be at 11.6 cents a bullet which drives cost up quite a bit. Still, we'd be talking $9 bucks per box which is about half of what you'd pay at WalMart for WWB or UMC stuff.
You can pick up a Lee Anniversary Kit in one caliber for about $100 bucks, that'll get you started. Upgrade as you see the need to so you can spread the cost out over time but at least getting the Kit you'll have everything you need to start with to get your feet wet.
If you do need brass there's a couple places online with pretty good deals on Once Fired brass, IIRC I paid $65 bucks for 1000 cases.
The really neat thing about reloading isn't only the savings, you can also custom taylor your loads to your gun. I've been reloading for about 32 years now and still have a lot of stuff I bought back in the late '80's. If you take care of your equipment it'll last a lifetime so once you get your initial investment "paid off" by the savings you get from loading it's all gravy from that point on.
Hit the Midway USA or Graf & Sons web site and look around for a Kit and get busy saving some cash, you'll be glad you did and wonder why you didn't do it sooner. ;)
 

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For me reloading is a relaxing hobby that I enjoy so the "time" element doesn't really matter anymore then the "time" a person would take to play a round of golf or go jogging would matter.
Even though Progressive presses aren't "Rocket Science" to operate I still think it's best for a person who's new to reloading to start on a single stage just to keep things simple until they get the hang of what it's all about.
I've been loading on an RCBS Partner Press that I picked up over 20 years ago on sale for $27 bucks. Still using my RCBS 5-0-5 powder scale too, got that in '87. Take care of your equipment and it'll last a good, long time.
One nice thing about the Kits is that you get pretty much all the equipment you need to get started. Granted it's sometimes not the top of the line stuff but you're not paying top of the line prices either. $100 bucks for the kit and another $30 for a set of dies and you'll have everything you need to get started. Just pick up some primers($3.99/100 around here), powder(Unique is $22/lb here) and bullets and you can load your brass back up and have ammo on hand.
I've never had to trim any of my handgun brass since most semi-auto brass will actually get shorter with use, not longer like a bottle neck rifle case will.
My procedure is as follows.
1)Put brass in case tumbler and clean.
2)Size and De-Prime then Neck Expand.
3) Using my RCBS "Handi" primer I'll prime my cases.
4)Sit down and Cast some bullets, lube, size then re-lube them so they're ready to load.
5)Adjust my powder measure so I'm throwing the right charge of powder, install my seater/crimp die then load powder, place bullet on case, seat and crimp then once I'm done I clean all the lube off of the outside of the bullet so they look pretty,LOL.
If you're using Jacketed or Plated bullets you can skip step 4 and you won't have to clean up the lube so that makes things go faster.
 

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And with step4 above, first replace your factory Glock barrel with an aftermarket barrel safe for bare lead bullets....
And unless you want to spend time with your Dremel opening up the barrel throat get a KKM barrel. Not that the LWD barrel for my G30 isn't good, it's just their barrel throats are way too small. They need to open them up to .452" for about the first .050" after the chamber so you can shoot standard length ammo in em'.;)
Of course I've also read about a lot of folks shooting lead ammo out of their factory Glock barrel without problems, you just need to make sure you clean the heck out of it before you shoot jacket stuff later on. Still, I went with a replacement barrel with regular rifling just to be on the safe side.:)
 

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Even if you get a quality single stage it'll not be totally useless once you pony up the funds for a progressive. You can still use it with the Lee Sizing dies for bullet sizing or for test runs of a new load or for case forming. A single stage press always has uses around the loading bench.
I've still got 400 rounds of my 1100 left to load but I'm not in any hurry. I have to cast bullets for it once I buy some wheel weights then I have to get those bullets prepped by lubing and sizing them. For me Bullet Casting and Reloading is a fun, relaxing hobby, don't really care if it takes me a while to load up a box, it's not about speed for me. If it were I'd get a Dillon Square Deal "B" or 550B and load up 600-800 rounds in an hour but then I'd not having "Thinking Time" and once I was done I'd just have extra time on my hands to sit around and get bored.
Once you get your ammo on hand, say 1000 rounds and if you only shoot a box or two a month then a good single stage would work out great for you since all you're really going to do is keep your ammo supply topped off. If on the other hand you'll be shooting a lot of IPSC, IDPA and GSSF events where you're going through 2000 or more rounds a month then you very well may actually need a progressive press just to keep up with ammo supply and to free up your time to go and shoot those events.
That's the cool thing about reloading, you can make it what YOU want it to be for you, from mild to wild, 100 rounds a month to 5000 rounds a month. It's all up to you as to what you get and how involved you want to become.
Regardless of if you can get 45acp for $12.50 a box and it'll cost you $9 a box to load it as long as you've got primers, powder and bullets on hand you'll have ammo even when the WalMart shelves run out of the $12.50 a box stuff and if you get into Bullet Casting then you just need to stock a boat load of primers, powder and wheel weights or other casting lead and you'll never run out of ammo until your supplies dry up.
Also, if you think about it, in a SHTF situation most folks will grab up all the loaded ammo but will leave the primers and powder so after they've shot up they're ammo you'll still be reloading stuff to hunt with and protect yourself with.
I don't think I can ever get out of reloading and just depend on store bought stuff, reloading is way too much fun and helps to cut costs and I can dang sure know I'll have ammo as long as the primers and powder holds out.
 

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My Dream press would have to be Dillon. I pulled the handle on a couple 1050's at Caswell's Shooting Range in Mesa, AZ. for about a year to earn some part time cash loading range ammo for them. Awesome press, Lifetime Warranty, Excellent Customer Service. Yep, Dillon for me, thanks. ;)
 

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I normally run Lee Carbide dies and they work pretty well but by a twist of fate I ended up getting my 45acp set in the Hornady brand with the Titanium Nitrite insert and they're working pretty well so far. First set of non-Lee dies I've had in quite a while.
Oh, and another thing, Manuals, lots of different Manuals. Get all of em' if you can, Lee, Lyman, Hornady, Speer and the little free books that the powder manufactures put out. That way you'll have plenty of data to mull over when trying to figure out a load.
 

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Just be sure you sort out your 45acp brass between small primer and large primer if you go with a progressive. Being a Single Stage user I have no such problem,LOL.
 
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