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O I have heard guys say yes and have heard them say no... So figured I would ask here... Do you reload steel... If you do any negative side effects and if you don't... Why don't you?
 

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Vegas-Misfit said:
O I have heard guys say yes and have heard them say no... So figured I would ask here... Do you reload steel... If you do any negative side effects and if you don't... Why don't you?
I don't think it would be cost effective, steel case ammo is so cheap..
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I understand that... But I wouldn't be buying the steel cases... They are all over the range though so if they are mixed in with my other brass just curious if there are any consequences to loading steel
 

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I do not reload aluminum either, simply because it is much more brittle than brass and there will always be the chance of incipient case head separation on a once-fired case that is invisible to the eye.

Plus, most aluminum cases I have seen use Berdan primers, which are not available in my area and even if they were I do not have the decapping tool for them and will not spend extra on a sizer/decapper die specifically for this purpose.

For that matter, I discard even brass cases with Berdan primers. Running them into my decapping die will break the pin and render my die useless. I know, this has happened already before, in 9mm, and thank God for RCBS's no-questions-no-hassles warranty, they sent me a replacement pin assembly within a week, no charge.
 

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Additionally, aluminum cases expand (like all cases) when fired, but since the cooling is so quick once the brass is on the ground, and the cooling is differential, the thermal distortion at the base and web of the case is usually more than is the norm on brass cases, and most sizer dies come short of the base, so one would end up with aluminum cases sized OK thru the case body up to a point like 1/8" or so of the base, which is not sized, and the web of the case become stressed. It is not as malleable as brass.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Those will go too the trash too... Thanx again hs1 for sharing your vast knowledge it really is greatly appreciated... Btw hope your havin fun on your vacation
 

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Instead of tossing them in the trash, you can do what i do:

collect them all together (all aluminums, all steels, and all .22 brass), by type of metal, flatten them with a hammer, and see if a recycler near you will buy them in bulk for scrap metal value. Worth a shot.
 

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The majority of steel and aluminum cased ammo is berdan primed so reloading is not an option. That being said, if you get steel case ammo that's boxer primed then you still run the risk of removing the coating on the case that stops it from sticking in the chamber of the firearm so it's really just not worth it IMHO.
 

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I've reloaded boxer primed 45acp, 40S&W, and .223. Even with a pistol ti-nitride die I will use just a dab of lube to help the sizing effort. I reload them to starting load specifications from the major published manuals. The cases reload and function fine. You have to watch the cases very close as the steel seems to become work hardened very fast. Two firings and splits usually start to develop.

I don't reload steel all the time but have it worked out if has to happen.

I've reloaded aluminum too but have not spent to much time with the. Mostly a trailboss load.
 
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