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I'm looking for shooter education course you have taken. Something that my wife and I could take together would be preferred.

I've done some research, but I don't think you can an honest opinion from a site selling you something, so I turn to you guys.
 

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A couple to maybe investigate...

Within your local area, there should be at least one store that supplies/sells firearms. Wether that be a mom-n-pop gun store/range, Gander Mountain, Scheels, Bass Pro, etc., they all offer classes of various kinds.
NRA pistol saftey, Defensive Pistol, Tactical pistol, Concelaed carry, Open carry, Various Hunting saftey, security...the list goes on. Call around to the stores or talk to other firearm owners in your area.

Through our local store/range, My wife and I took the NRA basic pistol saftey class years ago. For a husband/wife to do that together was pleasent and we enjoyed learing the in's-and-out's of firearm saftey, laws specific to our area, shooting saftey and skills, basic ballistics, and transportation (again, specific to our nazi-regime state) of firearms.

From there I've taken several Defensive pistol classes on my own at our local range and enjoyed every minute of it. The skills that you are taught are mind-blowing- but perishable. Thats why I come back year after year to refresh what I've learned (or forgotten).:D
 

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What part of the country are you in, how far are you willing to travel, and do you have any experience so far?
Texas, they are everywhere. I constantly see people advertising their classes but never get any feedback on them.

I'm willing to travel a little ways for a program that I know is good, that's why I'm thinking something on the national level would be good for me.
 

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That Helps, thanks for responding. If you have no training at all, maybe start with a NRA Basic pistol and Defense in the home, defense out of the home, or a local range will have some type of basic course to take.

For more advance you have Gunsite, in Paulden, AZ. Gunsite was one of the first and a lot of schools elsewhere base their programs on some things learned from here. <http://www.gunsite.com>

A place called Tactical Response teaches classes from Camden, TN, but they teach several classes each year in Bastrop, TX. This is not a beginner handgun course, but a relevant defensive shooting course and a lot of fun. <http://www.tacticalresponse.com>

Paul Gomez has a private school that travels and he also holds classes in Bastrop. <http://gomez-training.com> In fact, he will be there in January. Paul is one of the best instructors I have dealt with over the years and one of the best values I have seen in a course. He does a great job teaching how to defend yourself and dealing with common issues from medical to malfunctions that may come up during a real gunfight depending on which class you take. He also has some good youtube videos if you want to check him out.

Either one of these schools will teach you a lot if you are willing to learn from them. I am suretwo their are more in your area, these are just the two I personally know. Just let me know if you have any questions about either one.
 

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As an instructor, my best advice would be to start at the basics and work your way up. An NRA Basic Pistol course provides an excellent foundation for more advanced skills. Check the NRA's website for listed classes in your area. Plus, you can call the NRA and get recommendations on instructors in your area so you know you;ll be getting a good one.
 

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Front Sight courses are highly recommended.
 

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I also suggest working your way through the NRA Basic, Personal Protection In The Home, and Personal Protection Outside of the Home courses, but I do suggest that you look into the credentials of the instructor. The NRA instructor certifications really aren't that hard to get, and there are some charlatans out there who get the certifications simply to try to get some sort of credibility.
 

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I also suggest working your way through the NRA Basic, Personal Protection In The Home, and Personal Protection Outside of the Home courses, but I do suggest that you look into the credentials of the instructor. The NRA instructor certifications really aren't that hard to get, and there are some charlatans out there who get the certifications simply to try to get some sort of credibility.
I agree with this. There was two people in my instructor class that had only been shooting for 3 months and their only experiences was the NRA course taken before the instructor course. They can teach you the basics of gun safety, but that is about all.
 

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I agree with this. There was two people in my instructor class that had only been shooting for 3 months and their only experiences was the NRA course taken before the instructor course. They can teach you the basics of gun safety, but that is about all.
There were a couple in my Basic Pistol instructor class that were in that category. What concerns me more is the jacklegs that get the NRA certifications and then start trying to push all sorts of "tactical" classes with no qualifications to do so.
 

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There were a couple in my Basic Pistol instructor class that were in that category. What concerns me more is the jacklegs that get the NRA certifications and then start trying to push all sorts of "tactical" classes with no qualifications to do so.
Yea, I think there should be higher qualifications before being able to instruct some classes. Someone that has never seen combat, domestic or foreign, should not teach those level of classes. Unfortunately, anyone with enough time and money can have their own "tactical" shooting school.
 

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jfirecops said:
Yea, I think there should be higher qualifications before being able to instruct some classes. Someone that has never seen combat, domestic or foreign, should not teach those level of classes. Unfortunately, anyone with enough time and money can have their own "tactical" shooting school.
I have to agree, Some instructors seem to have little to no real world experience. I also think the standard for passing the firearms classes for civil, security, and law should be raised.
 

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I had a great time at front site in NV
I have to agree fully. Frontsight is a great place to go and they are offering discounted courses here and there. They would work with you and your wife and are very friendly not like a boot camp. I plan to take my wife there. I am a rifle shooter and my pistol was always a tool I would use to get to my rifle (I never had formal pistol training), but after that course I feel comfortable using a pistol to defend my home. My uncle is thinking (with some influence from me) to get a Glock 22 and I just got him a 4 day course so now he will know how to use it.
 

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Massad Ayoob Group -

August
MAG/40:

This is an intense, four-day, 40-hour immersion course in the “rules of engagement” for armed law-abiding private citizens. The course emphasizes legal issues, tactical issues, and aftermath management. Topics will include interacting with suspects, witnesses, responding police officers, threat recognition and mind-set, and the management of the social and psychological aftermath of having to use lethal force in defense of self or others. Also covered is preparing beforehand for legal repercussions and minimizing your exposure to them. Situations in the home, at the place of business, or “on the street” will all be covered. Range work will include instruction in the use of the defensive handgun under extreme stress. Drawing from concealment, two-handed stances, shooting from cover, one-handed stances with either hand, speed reloading, and more are taught with an overall emphasis on fast, accurate shot placement. The course will culminate with a written examination covering the classroom topics and a police-style handgun qualification course. Equipment List. Cost: $800
 

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In addition to an actual class, I keep my mind fresh by watching "The Art of the Dynamic Handgun," by Magpul Dynamics. Awesome video and the two instructors have left Magpul Dynamics and have started their own companies. I subscribe to all three of the organizations Facebook pages and receive tips and tricks. The videos are no substitute for live training, but it helps.
 

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The Civilian Marksmanship Program, or CMP, was founded in 1903 with the mission,
"To Promote Firearm Safety and Marksmanship Training With an Emphasis on Youth".

They are still up & running, and can be accessed through local gun clubs that are affiliates. Just go to their web page to get a list of affiliated organizations in your area. They have programs & training for all ages & skill levels. Here's a link: http://www.odcmp.com/
 

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. . .

Paul Gomez has a private school that travels and he also holds classes in Bastrop. <http://gomez-training.com> In fact, he will be there in January. Paul is one of the best instructors I have dealt with over the years and one of the best values I have seen in a course. He does a great job teaching how to defend yourself and dealing with common issues from medical to malfunctions that may come up during a real gunfight depending on which class you take. He also has some good youtube videos if you want to check him out. . . .
Paul Gomez died Late May / Early June. He was a hell of a person and world class shooting instructor and his passing is a tremendous loss for the shooting community. He will be sorely missed. Gods speed Paul!

In Memoriam — Paul Gomez
Andy Stanford

Paul Gomez was one of the ten greatest firearms instructors who ever lived. That’s my story, and I’m sticking to it. I can back up this assertion with hard facts.

But first, I’d like to discuss Paul the man. I know beyond a shadow of a doubt that he was a great father to his kids. Divorced and living away from his son and two daughters, he drove hours and hours every other week to spend quality time with them in his native Louisiana. I know they must’ve absorbed at least some of his unique personality. I guarantee it will serve them well. Our condolences to them all.

Yes, unique. Paul was nothing if not unique. Not too tall, bald on top, with a Cajun accent, he did not fit the Hollywood stereotype of a warrior. But he WAS one, having served in both the U.S. Army and as a full-time police officer. More importantly to me personally, he was a true gentle man. Gentle. By-God Gentle. Not surprisingly, Paul had a fetish for "man skirts". He was often seen wearing a kilt—taught class in one on more than one occasion. He had eclectic tastes in literature and music, and an open minded, progressive political anarchy.

Paul was often the quiet observer with a mind like a steel trap. Just as often he would debate the topic at hand with equal parts logic and passion. Paul was the encyclopedia and duty historian of practical firearms training. When Paul died, we lost a good part of our archives. This is NOT trivial.

I truly cannot overstate Paul’s intellect. Lots of memory and a powerful processor. Knew much about much, and the wider implications as well. A voracious reader, he quoted someone or other when he first saw the stacks next to the bookshelves in my house, *You’re out of book space. All my friends are out of book space.* He was relentlessly analytical and logical. Which is part of why he gets my top ten trainer vote. And he was a pioneer in the field, though perhaps not as well known as others.

Paul was one of the first guys to understand and advocate the use of the Kalashnikov as a rifle of choice. He developed a gunhandling system for this family of weapons, and documented it in a book that according to Paul was 90 plus percent complete. Had he pressed on and completed it, he would’ve been widely known as THE AK GUY. Some subconscious Achilles’ Heel kept him from finishing it. Maybe we can fish it out of his computer and get it published posthumously.

He also pioneered a state-of-the-art combat handgun handling system—taught in his Robust Pistol Manipulations (RPM) course. Paul finally convinced me of the merits of practicing equally with each hand. He experimented with and codified combat-worthy methods of one-handed malfunction clearances and reloads that represent true progress in the field. I invite graduates of the RPM class to get your heads together and formally document it to the best of your abilities.

As noted previously, in addition to being an innovator in the area of gun handling, Paul was the resident historian of the tactical training community. Knowing where you’ve been can keep you from duplicating efforts, and shed light on current endeavors. It takes a significant investment of time and energy to develop a mature understanding of any subject. Paul paid his dues many times over in learning about his chosen profession. Few, very few indeed, have even come close to this level of study and research.

Paul spent many, many training days as Craig *Southnarc* Douglas’ assistant, uke, and—Craig’s word and high praise considering the source—muse. I wince to think of how many times Paul was hit in the head by Craig, or shot with Simunitions at point-blank range. (The former being by far the more severe blow.) This did give Paul a high-level understanding of close quarters combat, and undoubtedly a high-level of pain tolerance as well.

Last but not least, Paul was very interested in tactical emergency medicine. The last several years I haven’t seen Paul as much as when I lived in Florida, but I know he put a fair amount of focus on the topic. He undoubtedly sifted through a myriad of systems and derived his own from the best of the best. In fact, I’d make a sizeable wager on this and be confident of winning.

Paul had modest needs. For a time he was content with the bottom bunk in the corner of the Tactical Response team room. I think this is the result of living a very rich mental life, finding interest in whatever was in front of him. He was generally happy, and was pleasant to be around. He was a great friend. He led a full life, and did what he wanted to do a significant fraction of his time on earth. Good for him!

His legacy is his children, the other lives he has touched in person, and the wisdom he has contributed to defensive and tactical firearms doctrine. Thanks to the internet, a good bit of the latter continues to live on YouTube. And there is one final blessing he can bestow on all of us. His death in his early-forties can serve as a reminder that no one has promised us tomorrow. Carpe Diem. Paul would approve.
 
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