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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just saw a set of recoil spring assemblies on glockstore that had "custom" spring weights to tune your competition gun.....they range from 14lbs to 22lbs? Can anyone explain how this would tune my gun what the benefits are?
 

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trigger252 said:
I just saw a set of recoil spring assemblies on glockstore that had "custom" spring weights to tune your competition gun.....they range from 14lbs to 22lbs? Can anyone explain how this would tune my gun what the benefits are?
Lighter springs allow the slide to cycle faster for follow up shots. It also helps with recoil..gives a different feel that is a quicker snap versus a heavier longer snap.

I can suggest going down to a 14lb spring, much lower and some folks have issues.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks....I was just going to ask if it increases malfunctions...do you personally use one of these reduced springs?
 

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Recoil spring should be dictated by the ammunition you're using, not by what just feels nice. A 14lb spring in a G20 shooting 230gr bear stoppers would not be good for the longevity of the gun. However, if you're using a G17 with 90 - 115gr light target loads then you absolutely could go down from the stock 17lb spring. If you're using a G24 with 6" 9mm conversion barrel and 90gr target loads then a 14lb spring not even be light enough.
 

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I use a 14# spring in my 34 with 124 grain bullets hitting just over 1000 fps for the minimum USPSA powder factor of 125, i get about 127 out of them. They won't cycle a stock spring. As Robert pointed out, you match the spring to the ammo.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Gotcha so this would be a good idea to mix with my other post about reloading to begin shooting sport competitions?
 

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But be careful.
Too light a spring can and will cuase damage to the slide buffer/stops and over time crack or break forward rails. This too can create too much felt recoil.
 

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And the slide...

I use a 14# spring in my 34 with 124 grain bullets hitting just over 1000 fps for the minimum USPSA powder factor of 125, I get about 127 out of them. They won't cycle a stock spring. As Robert pointed out, you match the spring to the ammo.
My guess is your 124 gr 1000 fps cartridges will reliably cycle smaller stock pistols that have inherently lighter slides.

With bullet weights ranging from 90 gr to 147 gr, my G26.3 and converted G27.3 cycle reliably with stock 16 lb recoil springs down to an IPSC PF of about 112.

The cartridge provides a certain amount of force to compress the recoil spring assembly and move the slide. To maintain the balance of force and 'pushback', as the weight of the slide increases, the spring weight of the recoil spring assembly must decrease... or the power factor of the cartridge must increase.

All three, the cartridge, the recoil spring assembly, and the slide, must be considered when 'fine tuning' the cycling of competition pistols.

Hope this helps... :D

Best regards,

Bob :)
 

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Other factor that effect spring weight selection are slide modifications (slide cuts to lighten the slide) and compensators. A lightened slide has less weight to drive rearward so a lighter spring may be needed. A compensated barrel has less gas pressure to cycle the slide and may also need a lighter spring to allow the slide to fully cycle properly. Finding the right recoil spring weight can be a pain in the you know what. As mentioned different bullet weights and velocities have to be put into the mix. But when you do find that sweet spot it greatly enhances the performance of a competition handgun.
 

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Your load will dictate your spring weight. I run a 13lb in my G34 Limited gun. My pet load uses a 147gr bullet at a 130pf and it is soft and accurate. No sight dip as the slide goes into battery and 100% reliable.
 

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I have a G21 with 6 mags. None want to take the 10th round. Tried leaving them loaded for months, which did nothing.
My G26 slide is too heavy. My 73 year old hands can barely pull it to the rear. Can I put in a lighter spring without risking damage to the pistol over time?
 

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Depends on the ammo, and what the end use is for. In competition, you go as low as possible in spring weight that will still cycle, and meet the power floor. For hunting, or SD, I actually go higher to minimize the brutal recoil. 22lb spring in my G20, and 20lb springs in my G31s. The old way of adjusting spring weight was to just start cutting coils until it wouldn't cycle, then use a new spring with 2 more coils.
 

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Frank, most Glocks will run on lighter springs. If you are not planning on shooting 25,000 rounds thru your G26, get a lighter spring. I don't think you will see a big reduction in cranking force, that's more technique.
 

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My G26 slide is too heavy. My 73 year old hands can barely pull it to the rear. Can I put in a lighter spring without risking damage to the pistol over time?
Hi, Frank!

Rather than lightening the spring, it may be a worthy effort to learn to rack the slide using the rear sights (a typical 'one-handed' slide rack). There are many online videos that illustrate the technique using different 'sight catches'... belts, table edges, et cetera.

For example...

One Handed Racking a Gun
[ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g5tpZ7OgJB0[/ame]

And, if the pistol is still fitted with plastic sights, it may be a good idea to replace them with metal sights.

Best regards,

Bob :)
 

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That's really a bad idea, with OEM sights that are tapered, for someone who has comprised physical ability. Take a look at this, it's a push/pull motion, all technique.

http://blog.cheaperthandirt.com/rack-slide-its-technique-strength/

And if the slide is too slippery for you, put some skateboard tape on the flats, and or, install a slide racker (lots of guys run them in competition on USPSA Open guns with frame mounted optics because there is hardly any of the slide to grab onto. There are several different models, some would obviously work better for CCW than others. There is also a gizmo called a Handi-Racker, might be just the ticker for you.





http://www.handi-racker.com/
 

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Frank, I myself have suffered from chronic osteoarthritis and psoriatic arthritis for over 15 years, and for which I have to take an injection every 2 weeks (and blood work every 3 months). One of my crew is a retired LEO, in his late 70's, and suffers from chronic rheumatoid arthritis and nerve damage to his hands. We both have developed techniques to overcome the limitations. It's not based on strength at all, just knowing the tricks.
 
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