Range Etiquette

Discussion in 'Range Reports' started by ROYALE-W-CHEESE, Feb 23, 2012.

  1. ROYALE-W-CHEESE

    ROYALE-W-CHEESE New Member

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    Hello all. N00bie here, been lurking for some time. Great site. Also been devouring all I can read about guns/shooting/safety/etc. Going to pick up my 21SF Gen3 (CA resident = no Gen4) after I get off work and intend to hit the shop's indoor range as soon as I take delivery.

    Other than safety rules and specific range rules (eg, this range has a no double-tap, no rapid fire rule), what range etiquette points should I bear in mind.

    Hypothetically, if you are a veteran shooter and you see me take the stall next to you, you're thinking: "I hope this rookie does/doesn't ________________." What are those thoughts? Any tips appreciated. I wouldn't want to unknowingly break any unspoken rules; piss anyone off; and I don't intend to break any safety rules.
     
    Bayou likes this.
  2. bhale187

    bhale187 New Member Supporter

    Just stick to gun handling safety rules and you'll be fine.
     

  3. Your range sucks. Lol
    Our ranges here have no head shots and that's about it.
     
  4. BLCKWLF

    BLCKWLF GrassHopper

    At the main range at Ben Avery, besides standard rules, you cannot draw and fire, you must use birdshot for shotguns, and that's about it. The most bizarre rule was that, when shooting muzzle loaders, when they call cease fire, you must fire into the bank. Shoot on a ceasefire? Well, it's the safest and one of the only ways to unload a muzzleloader. Thought it was weird but it makes sense.
     
  5. Webphisher

    Webphisher Duct Tape, Alabama Chrome

    My range doesn't allow rapid fire, and they describe it as you not being able to control the gun. Thats about it. You can draw from holster only AFTER an RO has cleared you. They just make you do some dry runs, make sure you aren't fingering the trigger as you pull it out etc...

    I've only really seen them talk to one guy about rapid fire, but he wasn't even hitting his own target.
     
  6. KeenansGarage

    KeenansGarage Hiding in plain sight....

    Taken from Jeff Cooper's 4 Rules for Gun Safety (I think).

    RULE I: ALL GUNS ARE ALWAYS LOADED

    RULE II: NEVER LET THE MUZZLE COVER ANYTHING YOU ARE NOT WILLING TO DESTROY

    RULE III: KEEP YOUR FINGER OFF THE TRIGGER UNTIL YOUR SIGHTS ARE ON THE TARGET

    RULE IV: BE SURE OF YOUR TARGET
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    RULE I: ALL GUNS ARE ALWAYS LOADED

    There are no exceptions. Do not pretend that this is true. Some people and organizations take this rule and weaken it;e.g. "Treat all guns as if they were loaded." Unfortunately, the "as if" compromises the directness of the statement by implying that they are unloaded, but we will treat them as though they are loaded. No good! Safety rules must be worded forcefully so that they are never treated lightly or reduced to partial compliance.

    All guns are always loaded - period!

    This must be your mind-set. If someone hands you a firearm and says, "Don't worry, it's not loaded," you do not dare believe him. You need not be impolite, but check it yourself. Remember, there are no accidents, only negligent acts. Check it. Do not let yourself fall prey to a situation where you might feel compelled to squeal, "I didn't know it was loaded!"
    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    RULE II: NEVER LET THE MUZZLE COVER ANYTHING YOU ARE NOT WILLING TO DESTROY

    Conspicuously and continuously violated, especially with pistols, Rule II applies whether you are involved in range practice, daily carry, or examination. If the weapon is assembled and in someone's hands, it is capable of being discharged. A firearm holstered properly, lying on a table, or placed in a scabbard is of no danger to anyone. Only when handled is there a need for concern. This rule applies to fighting as well as to daily handling. If you are not willing to take a human life, do not cover a person with the muzzle. This rule also applies to your own person. Do not allow the muzzle to cover your extremities, e.g. using both hands to reholster the pistol. This practice is unsound, both procedurally and tactically. You may need a free hand for something important. Proper holster design should provide for one-handed holstering, so avoid holsters which collapse after withdrawing the pistol. (Note: It is dangerous to push the muzzle against the inside edge of the holster nearest the body to "open" it since this results in your pointing the pistol at your midsection.) Dry-practice in the home is a worthwhile habit and it will result in more deeply programmed reflexes. Most of the reflexes involved in the Modern Technique do not require that a shot be fired. Particular procedures for dry-firing in the home will be covered later. Let it suffice for now that you do not dry-fire using a "target" that you wish not to see destroyed. (Recall RULE I as well.)

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Rule III: KEEP YOUR FINGER OFF THE TRIGGER UNTIL YOUR SIGHTS ARE ON THE TARGET

    Rule III is violated most anytime the uneducated person handles a firearm. Whether on TV, in the theaters, or at the range, people seem fascinated with having their finger on the trigger. Never stand or walk around with your finger on the trigger. It is unprofessional, dangerous, and, perhaps most damaging to the psyche, it is klutzy looking. Never fire a shot unless the sights are superimposed on the target and you have made a conscious decision to fire. Firing an unaligned pistol in a fight gains nothing. If you believe that the defensive pistol is only an intimidation tool - not something to be used - carry blanks, or better yet, reevaluate having one around. If you are going to launch a projectile, it had best be directed purposely. Danger abounds if you allow your finger to dawdle inside the trigger guard. As soon as the sights leave the target, the trigger-finger leaves the trigger and straightens alongside the frame. Since the hand normally prefers to work as a unit - as in grasping - separating the function of the trigger-finger from the rest of the hand takes effort. The five-finger grasp is a deeply programmed reflex. Under sufficient stress, and with the finger already placed on the trigger, an unexpected movement, misstep or surprise could result in a negligent discharge. Speed cannot be gained from such a premature placement of the trigger-finger. Bringing the sights to bear on the target, whether from the holster or the Guard Position, takes more time than that required for moving the trigger finger an inch or so to the trigger.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    RULE IV: BE SURE OF YOUR TARGET

    Know what it is, what is in line with it, and what is behind it. Never shoot at anything you have not positively identified. Be aware of your surroundings, whether on the range or in a fight. Do not assume anything. Know what you are doing.

    SUMMARY:

    Make these rules a part of your character. Never compromise them. Improper gunhandling results from ignorance and improper role modeling, such as handling your gun like your favorite actor does. Education can cure this. You can make a difference by following these gunhandling rules and insisting that those around you do the same. Set the example. Who knows what tragedies you, or someone you influence, may prevent?
     
  7. series11

    series11 Hail Commifornia Lifetime Supporting Member

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    I fully agree with KeenansGarage.

    In CA, I'm stuck here too for the mean time, no double taps, rapid fire, no from the holster shots, and listen to the range master. What I suggest in the future is to find a range where you can do all of this and no rangemaster. May I ask where you are?

    I drive 2 hours up to Orovile and they have a range there where you can bring stuff to shoot and there is no range master. Granted there are yahoos sometimes that is why I go early when they are still in bed sleeping off their hangover. there are other places where it is less crowded and you can shoot all you like however you like.
     
  8. Happysniper1

    Happysniper1 New Member

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    @Series11:
    ....moving targets? ;)
     
  9. Happysniper1

    Happysniper1 New Member

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    NRA BASIC FIREARM SAFETY RULES

    1. ALWAYS keep the gun pointed in a safe direction at all times. - Safe direction will vary depending on your location. At a firing range, it is always downrange and somewhat low (i.e., keep it pointed low). In a 2-story apartment, down may not be a safe direction. When standing on concrete pavement, down is not a safe direction. This applies to handing prior to firing as well as handling when transitioning a storage case or elsewhere. Means NEVER POINT THE MUZZLE AT ANYTHING YOU ARE NOT WILLING TO DESTROY OR KILL.

    2. ALWAYS keep your finger off the trigger (and outside of the trigger guard) until you are ready to fire. If you are handling the gun, finger off the trigger. If you are holstering or unhosltering, finger off the trigger. If you have just launched a round at a target and want to see the impact point, finger off the trigger. A gun will not fire if your finger is not on the trigger (except if it is malfunctioning, in which case it is not safe to use or to load anyway!).

    3. ALWAYS keep the gun unloaded until you are ready to use it. Common sense. Does not apply to a firearm carried for personal protection: like a fire extinguisher, you do not wait until your house is on fire to load your extinguisher...same thing with a self-defense handgun. Exception is if your jurisdiction does not allow transport of a loaded firearm (together with a CCW/CHL permit).

    OTHER RULES:

    * KNOW YOUR TARGET AND WHAT IS BEYOND. Even if the range is "hot" and you are told you are clear to fire, look beyond your target for anything that may be hurt, injured, killed, or damaged if you miss your target. In a real-life scenario, this means innocent bystanders that can be killed by your bullets.

    * KNOW HOW TO SAFELY OPERATE THE GUN. That means you yourself knowing all the controls and uses of all features of your handgun. Common sense.

    * BE SURE THE GUN IS SAFE TO OPERATE. Some issues, such as plugged barrels and dirty/corroded actions, can cause a gun to explode, possibly causing serious injury to yourself and to others. That is why it is also important to carefully inspect your gun when cleaning: to look for potential hazards and damage.

    * USE ONLY THE CORRECT AMMUNITION AS APPROPRITATE FOR YOUR GUN. Check your manual if the gun is safe for high-pressure (+P and +P+ ammunition). 10mm is not the same as .40S&W, .45GAP is not the same as .45ACP is not the same as .45COLT/LONG COLT, .357Magnums cannot be fired out of .38Special revolvers, 9mm Luger (aka 9mm Parabellum, 9x19mm) is not the same as .380ACP (aka 9x17mm) is not the same as 9mm-Mak (aka 9x18 or 9mm Makarov), and so on. At best, using wrong ammunition will result in an embarrasing misfire or no discharge, at worst, it can blow up your gun and cause serious injury to yourself and others.

    * WEAR EYE AND EAR PROTECTION. Elementary. Whatever happens, you can always buy another gun. You cannot buy another set of ears or eyes. This will be some protection to you in case your firearm or ammunition malfunctions, and also as protection in case the gun of the guy next to you malfunctions.

    * NEVER USE ALCOHOL OR PRESCRIPTION DRUGS THAT MAY ALTER YOUR STATE OF MIND WHILE SHOOTING. This is called being "under the influence". In some states, it is illegal to operate a firearm with even the tiniest amount of alcohol in your blood. It is never a good idea to mix guns and booze or drugs of any kind. ATF rules say the Federal Government does not consider marijuana as a medicinal preparation, but as a controlled drug, even with a so-called medicinal marijuana card.

    * STORE GUNS SO THAT THEY ARE INACCESSIBLE TO UNAUTHORIZED PERSONS. At home, do not leave guns lying around in plain view, especially with children or teenagers or incompetent or unreliable (or unknown) adults. If they must be out in the open, consider using a cable lock or trigger lock to render them inoperative. Remember: guns are a high-value item, and some random guest in your house may covet your firearm more than he would honor your friendship.

    * MAINTAIN YOUR GUN IN THE MANNER RECOMMENDED BY THE MANUFACTURER . At the very least, clean and lubricate them as appropriate, depending on the manufacturer's manual. If you do not have the manual, contact the manufacturer to obtain one or search for one online.

    * BE AWARE THAT SOME ACTIVITIES REQUIRE ADDITIONAL SAFETY PRECAUTIONS. For instance, competitive shooting activities often have a 180-Degree shoot zone...describe an arc extending from left shoulder to right shoulder: never point the gun outside of the 180* Zone, and be aware if you happen to step into a shooters' 180* Zone.

    ****************

    Other recommendations:

    1. In the Forum (Welcome, by the way!), know and follow the Rules as posted in the Forum main page.
    2. Recommend you post a *Hi there* message in the "Introductions" section so everyone has a chance to say Hi back at you!
    3. Don't take it personally if posts in reply to you or quoting you, if these posts seem personal make you feel defensive, everyone here at the Forum is a mellow dude (and dudette!), so if you feel offended, just post a reply saying so, and there are no ruffled feathers. Over here, you are among friends.

    Cheers, stay safe, and shoot safe!
     
  10. series11

    series11 Hail Commifornia Lifetime Supporting Member

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    Yeah, the last time I went there were some squirrely looking guys that had shot guns and were shooting at my targets... I kindly told the less weird looking one that those were mine. I don't think they wanted to throw a fit because I had more people and more guns than them.
     
  11. Happysniper1

    Happysniper1 New Member

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    I've had something like that happen to my group once, a long time ago. Helps when you walk up to them, smiling and all friendly, with a badge on your belt and a pistol on your hip....:D
     
  12. series11

    series11 Hail Commifornia Lifetime Supporting Member

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    Yeah the badge helps!!!!

    I didn't have one. I just had bigger numbers and more firepower. But I was friendly and smiling carrying my XCR....
     
  13. Happysniper1

    Happysniper1 New Member

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    That works, too. And remember, in a situation like this, a cellphone is your best friend. Know the local Sheriff's Office dispatch number, as well as local PD non-emergency dispatch. Of course, if lead starts flying or they get aggressive, then 9-1-1.
     
  14. Happysniper1

    Happysniper1 New Member

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    Just wanted to restate for the benefit of the OP:

    @Royale-W-Cheese, this is for you:

     
  15. havasu

    havasu Well-Known Member Supporter

    Friends indeed.
     
  16. SHOOTER13

    SHOOTER13 RETIRED MODERATOR Sponsor Lifetime Supporting Member

    Welcome to the Glock Forum Royale....!!
     
  17. Happysniper1

    Happysniper1 New Member

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    Has the OP logged back in since he posted his Hi?
     
  18. ROYALE-W-CHEESE

    ROYALE-W-CHEESE New Member

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    Hello again. Thank you all for the advice and anecdotes. I'm well versed if not fully experienced in all the safety rules -- it's part of our certification in purchasing a handgun in CA -- yet it's always helpful to hear what veteran shooters emphasize from their experience.

    My range experience was fairly straight-forward. The two range managers were quite welcoming and very helpful with my typical noobie questions. (I was surprised that one even offered a tip that was counter-productive to the range's bottom line: buy my ammo, targets, eyes/ears elsewhere due to the markup at the range/shop.)

    The 21SF was quite "poppy" as opposed to "snappy". The .45 felt recoil was quite... guttural. I thoroughly enjoyed it. Given my evening social schedule, I had only an hour to spend, going through about 60 rounds of Remington UMC green box, both FMJ and JHP. (Side note: as others have posted elsewhere in the forums, UMC is quite a dirty round indeed!)

    The new experience was scary, exciting, nerve-wracking, intense, zen-like, etc all at the same time. Mostly, it was addicting.
     
  19. ROYALE-W-CHEESE

    ROYALE-W-CHEESE New Member

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    That's just one range within my driving radius. It's the only indoor one open late in the evening ('til 10:00pm). I'm looking forward to learning the rules at all the several other ranges in my area.

    No head shots?
     
  20. ROYALE-W-CHEESE

    ROYALE-W-CHEESE New Member

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    I am in Sacramento. The range I went to last night is The Gun Room in Elk Grove. I've been on the trap/skeet ranges at Cordova, and will check out Sac Valley next weekend. Where are you?