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Call me Bronco...
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Aside from the polished barrels (I'm assuming smoother operation) what purpose does lettering, polished block pins and chrome or polished parts serve? My firearms aren't wardrobe accessories they are tools. I mean NO disrespect to anybody with a pretty gun, I'm just trying to understand it.
 

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For most people, it's just a way to personalize your Glock.
 

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GrassHopper
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Purely cosmetic. That said, some people aren't into guns for just protection but for fun, collecting, and sport as well.
 

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If it goes boom or bang, I want to play with it!
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While some may argue that a polished barrel makes for smoother operation, but the reality of the situation is it's purely cosmetic. That being said, my personal firearms are customized with most of the things you listed above, not because it was "necessary" but because it did 2 things for me. #1- I became intimately familiar with my gun. Familiarity= comfort in use.
#2- Personalization- doing these customizations makes it yours. Glocks are very plain looking from the mfgr. make it your own and stand out as an individual.

My $.02
 

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Premium Member
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It's called personalizing to what u like .. It's a hobby for me and fun to go shoot.. I have others that's not but all my glocks are just cause there mine and I can ..
 

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Glockin’ since 1993
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41,462 Posts
Swords, shields, knives, armor, and assorted weaponry has been customized, adorned and personalized for millennia plus. Firearms are a natural extension of this. In the US handguns have been engraved, inlayed, embellished, silver/gold/nickel/chrome plated for our entire history. Look at cowboy/law enforcement guns from the late 1800's forward. Those were working guns and also pieces of art. It may not be your thing but I admire the works of these craftsman and the evolution of beautification.

Photograph Rectangle Line Trigger Font
 

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Load Bearing Wall
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I imagine the first human to use a rock for a weapon started it. You gotta have a favorite rock, and ya gotta sleep sometime. So you decorate yours, in case that skinny little dweeb that sleeps on the other side of the cave tries to hustle off with it.
 

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trdfurgesson said:
aside from the polished barrels (i'm assuming smoother operation) what purpose does lettering, polished block pins and chrome or polished parts serve? My firearms aren't wardrobe accessories they are tools. I mean no disrespect to anybody with a pretty gun, i'm just trying to understand it.
no reason a tool cant be fashion statement, they actually have been since the dawn of the firearms age. Pirates are a perfect example.cowboys too
 

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Aside from the polished barrels (I'm assuming smoother operation) what purpose does lettering, polished block pins and chrome or polished parts serve? My firearms aren't wardrobe accessories they are tools. I mean NO disrespect to anybody with a pretty gun, I'm just trying to understand it.
One other thing folks haven't mentioned: ease of cleaning.

A blued/painted part is harder to clean. Polished parts, since there is less for dirt/residue to "grab" on to, just wipes clean with a rag.

Not that block pins get that dirty, but take for example a pistol with a polished barrel. You fire 10 rounds through it.. You can, conceivably, just wipe it clean without having to get into scrubbing the barrel. I'd scrub the barrel anyway (I'm OCD like that though).


Mostly, thought, it's about personalization. Same reason why people put accessories on their cars or put their favorite pictures as their desktop wallpaper on their computers.

D
 

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Call me Bronco...
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133 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Thank you all for the replies, I never been a artistic type of person so it's just not my thing but you do have some very nice glocks. I even had the wolf head taken off the hood of my LWD barrelI. I really liked the rock analogy. The point about customizing vehicles compared to Glocks made sense. I have customized my 4x, not for aesthetics but for utility purposes. Wouldn't head out on a run without that stuff. I hope I did not offend anyone. And thank you the the pictures.
 

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Call me Bronco...
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133 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Danzig said:
Swords, shields, knives, armor, and assorted weaponry has been customized, adorned and personalized for millennia plus. Firearms are a natural extension of this. In the US handguns have been engraved, inlayed, embellished, silver/gold/nickel/chrome plated for our entire history. Look at cowboy/law enforcement guns from the late 1800's forward. Those were working guns and also pieces of art. It may not be your thing but I admire the works of these craftsman and the evolution of beautification.
This is really nice, I don't like polished slides but this is beautiful.
 

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Thank you all for the replies, I never been a artistic type of person so it's just not my thing but you do have some very nice glocks. I really liked the rock analogy. The point about customizing vehicles compared to Glocks made sense. I have customized my 4x, not for aesthetics but for utility purposes. Wouldn't head out on a run without that stuff. I hope I did not offend anyone. And thank you the the pictures.
No offense taken! Great discussion.
 

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Load Bearing Wall
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No offense taken here either. It's all just shiny rocks.
 

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Glockin’ since 1993
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TRDFurgesson said:
This is really nice, I don't like polished slides but this is beautiful.
Not mine. Just pics for illustration purposes.
No offense taken. A majority of my guns are purpose built, no bling. I also have personalized guns.
 

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Load Bearing Wall
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The rifles made by the W.J. Jeffrey Co, have been my favorites since I was a boy. Reading about the great African hunters of the 19th century was a pastime I always took much pleasure in.

This W.L. Jeffrey Co. Hammerless Underlever Snap Action Boxlock Ejector in .600 Nitro Express Double Rifle, was made in 1907, and the pinnacle of fine big game rifles. This one has been used well, and today you probably couldn't touch it for less than $50,000. This is the way they were delivered, the fine detail engraving pays homage to what's inside.

The last pic says it all. The Max load ammo specs are engraved on the rifle by the factory.

900 Grs Bullet Max. 100 Grs Cordite.

I made this post, in part for Dutchs. Who likes big rifles too.



















 

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SeventiesWreckers said:
The rifles made by the W.J. Jeffrey Co, have been my favorites since I was a boy. Reading about the great African hunters of the 19th century was a pastime I always took much pleasure in.

This W.L. Jeffrey Co. Hammerless Underlever Snap Action Boxlock Ejector in .600 Nitro Express Double Rifle, was made in 1907, and the pinnacle of fine big game rifles. This one has been used well, and today you probably couldn't touch it for less than $50,000. This is the way they were delivered, the fine detail engraving pays homage to what's inside.

The last pic says it all. The Max load ammo specs are engraved on the rifle by the factory.

900 Grs Bullet Max. 100 Grs Cordite.

I made this post, in part for Dutchs. Who likes big rifles too.
That is gorgeous. I remember as a little kid, reading American Rifleman and seeing ads for commemorative pistols and rifles and wishing I could get one to put on my desk.

D
 

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The rifles made by the W.J. Jeffrey Co, have been my favorites since I was a boy. Reading about the great African hunters of the 19th century was a pastime I always took much pleasure in.

This W.L. Jeffrey Co. Hammerless Underlever Snap Action Boxlock Ejector in .600 Nitro Express Double Rifle, was made in 1907, and the pinnacle of fine big game rifles. This one has been used well, and today you probably couldn't touch it for less than $50,000. This is the way they were delivered, the fine detail engraving pays homage to what's inside.

The last pic says it all. The Max load ammo specs are engraved on the rifle by the factory.

900 Grs Bullet Max. 100 Grs Cordite.

I made this post, in part for Dutchs. Who likes big rifles too.
Thank you Wrecker!! Sir, that is not just a rifle! That is a historical piece of artwork! I know some people may say I am weirs for this but I have just set and stared at it! All I could do is imagine seeing it shoot and think of the absolute beauty of the power behind that massive round and what anyone would have to think in the last second on the other end of that massive beauty!! Thank you sir! I have to ask? I want to copy those pics and frame them in my house? I am in awe of that!!
 

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Load Bearing Wall
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Copy away Dutchs, there are probably better pics out there from auction houses, but copy away. It is an Awesome rifle. As were the men that used them. Their stories are legend.

Stuff dreams are made of. The good stuff, that is.
 
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