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24 years in the military and 3+ years as a combat trainer overseas and I rarely use the slide lock lever to release the slide.
I was recently going through my company's quarterly qualification and the RSO told me that using the lever was faster than overhand.
He broke out the timer and timed me on both during a slide-lock reload.
My overhand was 0.5 seconds faster back on target because my smallish hands didn't have to shift my grip.
He shut up after that.
Anyway, during stressful situations, your body will revert to muscle memory.
Overhand is mine.
 

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I never use the slide stop to release the slide. I don't like to wear out the slot where I would have to replace the slide.
 

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Interesting topic! There's an interesting video where Larry Vickers is at the Glock Academy in Smyrna, while LV. Teaches using the slide stop and the Glock instructor taught the sling shot method. They discussed this very topic. The Glock instructor taught the slingshot method because he only teaches glock usage while LV. Teaches all hand guns and explained that if you get too used to the slingshot then pick up a barretta 92 and slingshot it you stand a very good chance of de cooking it and it's also possible on the 92 that when slingshoting it as the slide hits home there is a chance the extra force will cause the safety to engage itself. While I don't own a 92 and probably never will I still practice both methods.
 

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24 years in the military and 3+ years as a combat trainer overseas and I rarely use the slide lock lever to release the slide.
I was recently going through my company's quarterly qualification and the RSO told me that using the lever was faster than overhand.
He broke out the timer and timed me on both during a slide-lock reload.
My overhand was 0.5 seconds faster back on target because my smallish hands didn't have to shift my grip.
He shut up after that.
Anyway, during stressful situations, your body will revert to muscle memory.
Overhand is mine.
The overhand method requires much more hand movement, than the slide stop release.
When performing a slide lock reload, as the support hand inserts the magazine, it is in position to release the slide stop as it reacquires the shooting grip. Much less hand movement = faster return to battery and re-acquisition of the shooting grip.
No doubt your training has refined your technique to the point where it works well for you. I would suggest that anyone decide how they prefer to perform reloads, and do it the same way every time. Build that muscle memory to a point where it's preformed without conscious thought. That's the way you'll do it under stress.
 

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He broke out the timer and timed me on both during a slide-lock reload.
My overhand was 0.5 seconds faster back on target because my smallish hands didn't have to shift my grip.
A 'timed' response! :thankyou:

For me, that's the key... reloading without compromising my master grip is faster.

Best regards,

Bob :)
 

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There is no one faster. Keeping the gun at eye level, notice the falling magazine is not quite at the belt line when he smashes a new magazine in. For USPSA, you never go to slide lock, in fact, most of these STI Open/Limited guns will not slide lock.

[ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hgdq1FBYTUE[/ame]
 

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For USPSA, you never go to slide lock, in fact, most of these STI Open/Limited guns will not slide lock.
That's fine, but many of us are focused on self defense techniques... and when under stress, will more than likely 'shoot to slide lock'.

Reloading from slide lock is something we need to practice.

Best regards,

Bob :)
 

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All the training I have received the instructors have taught to relay on gross motor skills and to train with said gross motor movements. Anything that is a fine motor skill under stress have a higher tendency to fail. I train by pulling back on the slide and letting it ride forward.
 

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This is one of the most fair presentations I've seen on the subject.

He personally prefers the 'slide rack' technique (for reasons he explains), but is actually faster with (and recognizes the value of) the 'release the slide stop' technique.

It's an interesting watch... :D

Slide [Stop] vs Racking the Slide
[ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-p9JcQGyw2E[/ame]

Best regards,

Bob :)
 

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I have been using the slide stop to release the slide after loading a fresh magazine. Also doing it after inspecting the chamber for stowaways. Now I am reading that might be bad for the gun!!
The argument being given is that Glock calls it a slide stop, if they wanted users to use it to release the slide it would be called slide release. Can someone shed some light on this? Should I re-train myself to pull the slide?
I've always done it the same way as you have and never had a problem, but I'll stop if it's bad for the gun. I'll have to see what everybody else says about it.
 

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I have been using the slide stop to release the slide after loading a fresh magazine. Also doing it after inspecting the chamber for stowaways. Now I am reading that might be bad for the gun!!
The argument being given is that Glock calls it a slide stop, if they wanted users to use it to release the slide it would be called slide release. Can someone shed some light on this? Should I re-train myself to pull the slide?
I've always done it the same way as you have and never had a problem, but I'll stop if it's bad for the gun. I'll have to see what everybody else says about it.
The glock manual that comes with the gun says you can do it either way.
GLOCK INSTRUCTION FOR USE: LOADING AND FIRING
http://stevespages.com/pdf/glock.pdf

4. After the last round has been fired, the slide remains open. Remove the empty magazine from the weapon by pushing the magazine catch (19). Insert a new magazine and then either push the slide stop lever (27) downwards (see photo), or pull the slide slightly backwards and allow it to spring forwards. The weapon is now again secured and ready to fire.
Best regards,

Bob :)
 

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The in the video keeps calling it the slide lock. The slide lock is what keeps the slide from flying of the gun, the slide stop is what releases the slide. He is just another "Tactical Plumber" Front Site guy. You never do see the times, don't know how big the steel is, or at what distance. He drops his head too low during the reload, has way too much tactical turtle stance, and I notice his shirt is almost in the holster. Not to mention he was slow as syrup, That was a waste of time.

Here is the real thing, Travis from the AMU, notice his head never moves off the target, pistol at eye level (2:11 in). Those are standard full size USPSA poppers at 11 yards.

[ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8d2VdaiIodo[/ame]
 

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Here is the real thing...
Yes, he's a master craftsman with exceptional skills and technique... some of us are mere mortals. ;)

More to the point, this thread is about 'Pulling back the slide vs using [the] slide stop'... and he demonstrates neither technique. (Nor did your previous video.)

How about finding us a 'world class' video on topic? :D

Best regards,

Bob :)
 

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The Nomenclature Police aside, its already been determined that Glock doesn't really care which method you use, so we can put that on the back burner.
I personally don't care which method anyone uses either. Just take the right/wrong out of the equation, and do what's comfortable for you as an individual.
Practice your preferred method diligently, but keep in mind, there's more than one way to skin a cat.;)
 

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Here's both techniques demonstrated by a Grand Master (note the 'support thumb' slide stop release technique).

Also, note that he compromises his master grip to eject the magazine. He describes his technique to do so and how he reacquires his master grip.

An excellent watch!!! :D

Pistol Reload Lesson- Shannon Smith- Grand Master and World Champion Shooter

[ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VfIaMB1TvLI[/ame]

Best regards,

Bob :)
 

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I personally don't care which method anyone uses either. Just take the right/wrong out of the equation, and do what's comfortable for you as an individual.
In my personal experience, that is key! :thumbsup:

In my early years, I almost quit shooting and sold all my 'stuff' because 'the experts' told me I had to do things a certain way... and it didn't work (for me). :(

Finally, what became obvious (to me) is that each of us have 'natural' tendencies and techniques. And, what seems to work best is to 'discover' these techniques and refine them to achieve the best possible results. :D

Thanks for the reminder! :thankyou:

Best regards,

Bob :)
 
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