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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been using the slide stop to release the slide after loading a fresh magazine. Also doing it after inspecting the chamber for stowaways. Now I am reading that might be bad for the gun!!
The argument being given is that Glock calls it a slide stop, if they wanted users to use it to release the slide it would be called slide release. Can someone shed some light on this? Should I re-train myself to pull the slide?
 

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My training says to never use it to rack a round. The extra pull back you get from racking and let fly ensures full battery. But I've seen plenty of guys use it to rack a round. As a creature of habit I always rack and let fly to chamber. (From an open locked chamber or closed).

On reloads it
 

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I like to ride the slide back on a empty chamber. I feel this is a good habit. Letting it slam home empty is a little harder on it. Probably would not notice for a long time though. If you ever get into 1911's its a very good habit and generally considered good etiquette to never let it slam home. Doing it to load and ready your gun is fine and what the gun was designed to do. I personally like to sling the slide when loading my pistols. Muscle memory I guess. If you have a malfunction I think Tap, Rack and Bang drill is more natural to you if you have always used slide racking for everything else. Just my 2 cents.
 

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I prefer using the overhand slingshot method on all guns. It's a gross motor skill as opposed to the fine motor skill of pushing a button. Also like mentioned above pulling the slide all the way back gives the slide more momentum ensuring the return to battery.
 

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I prefer using the overhand slingshot method on all guns. It's a gross motor skill as opposed to the fine motor skill of pushing a button. Also like mentioned above pulling the slide all the way back gives the slide more momentum ensuring the return to battery.
I totally agree with with this statement as it refers to gross motor skills versus fine motor skills. I will, however, question the benefit from "sling-shotting" the slide as opposed to using the slide stop lever. Either will put the gun into battery.

Over the years, while potentially slower, I use an overhand grab/slingshot to reload guns that have gone empty. There is no "hunting" for the slide stop lever, and it works every time. That's just me, and YMMV. Best regards.

Dave
 

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I like to ride the slide back on a empty chamber. I feel this is a good habit. Letting it slam home empty is a little harder on it.
I'm with you on this, and I do the same. I don't let the slide go on an empty gun. That's just me. But, I'm not so sure that is the direction of this thread. Maybe I'm wrong.:confused: Best regards.

Dave
 

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I ease the slide on an empty chamber out of habit, and slingshot on reloads. That being said I've installed extended lock levers on both my Glocks. I like having choices and it gives me another option for dropping the slide if I've only got one hand to work with.
Just my .02.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hey folks thanks for the responses....

@mustangman40: any link for the extended releases. Is that a DIY or do you need a gunsmith for that?
 

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i can't bring myself to use that old slide stop to load a round in. always pulled back and released the slide to strip a round into an empty chamber. don't know why, both actions do the same thing. and always, always ride the slide home gently on an empty chamber. could never see the point letting the slide just slam shut, can't be good.
 

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Other benefit of racking is keeping the gun and your hands up near your eye level when clambering and reloading. Helps keep your eyes on target or threat. "Rack high" is a constant command where I train.
 

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Guess I'm the loan wolf here. I always use the slide stop. As far as gross motor skills, I think it's more of a muscle memory thing. I don't ever think about it and never search for it. The slide stop is just there and I hit it without thinking.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
i can't bring myself to use that old slide stop to load a round in. always pulled back and released the slide to strip a round into an empty chamber. don't know why, both actions do the same thing. and always, always ride the slide home gently on an empty chamber. could never see the point letting the slide just slam shut, can't be good.
Some of the YouTube videos show people being extremely rough during the safety check part, whether it's before cleaning or something else. The guy I used to go shooting with back in TX, hated using the slide stop. I think he had a 9mm Glock and a 1911 type .45, I forget the make. Going forward, I will certainly keep from slamming the slide on an empty chamber, and make it a habit to pull the slide to chamber a round. Just seems like a good habit to develop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Guess I'm the loan wolf here. I always use the slide stop. As far as gross motor skills, I think it's more of a muscle memory thing. I don't ever think about it and never search for it. The slide stop is just there and I hit it without thinking.
Same here... I keep reaching for it because it seems more convenient. My other problem is I don't shoot that often... maybe once or twice a month, unlike some of the guys here that carry a gun as a part of their job. I would think they probably spend more time practicing making them more aware of the subtleties.
 

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First of all, the Glock uses a slide stop, not a slide release, that's for 1911's. You can load it 3 ways, after stuffing a magazine in, by cranking the slide from slide forward, by pushing the slide stop button from slide lock, or by smashing a magazine into the gun from slide lock. When I start a stage it's loaded by cranking the slide, if I get lost on my round count, and run to slide lock (bad for USPSA), then I tend smash the magazine in and it will self load. When it's time to unload and show clear, I lock the slide back, and then push the slide stop to release. There is no need to ease it forward, it's no different than what happens during firing. I've only replaced one slide stop in over 200,000 rounds on my old 2 pin G17, and that was not from wear, it was because the spring went dead.
 

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I frequently see these discussions. If your actions get the gun charged and ready, I guess it's as good as it gets. I've been shooting and carrying handguns for 60yrs or so. I learned early on that you didn't drop the slide on an unloaded chamber. Especially with a 1911. On an empty chamber, I ride the slide into battery. When performing an administrative reload, I sling shot the slide. When I'm doing a speed reload, I use the slide stop. I don't buy into the gross motor skill thing. If you can remember to disengage the safety, operate the trigger and mag release, why can't you operate the slide stop? Under stress, you'll perform as you train. In matches, when I perform a reload I am not aware of dropping the slide using the slide stop. It just happens, because that's the way I practice. I practice that way because it's faster than any other method, and in my experience just as reliable.
 

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I rack the slide and don't use the slide stop because in 45 years I have always done it that way coming from shooting a .45 ACP mostly...
 

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I always rack and release. That's why it's called s SLIDE STOP!
 
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