Glock Firearms banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Tomorrow I plan to load my first round of plated bullets. I was wondering if anyone has any opinions among the two. The only thing I have to be concerned about is staying away from the maximum load. Up to this point I have found all load data I can find from as many sources I can find and I have stayed within mid-range of the recommended load. I am planning to stick with this strategy unless someone advises against it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,516 Posts
Not familiar with "plated" rounds, only "Washed" and FMJ. Stick with the FMJ in my opinion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks G-23, always appreciate all opinions. EvilD, do you stay with mid-range from the recommended load with plated?
 

·
Certified Glock Armorer
Joined
·
4,715 Posts
With plated or washed ammo you have a very thin layer of copper over the lead bullet. Next to using "lead bullets" this is cheapest way to go.
This thin layer of copper is fairly easy to scrape off. The scrapping or removal of this copper plating can be done when seating the bullet and or
during travel down the barrel. As you know using lead bullets in a Glock barrel is a no no. However I have heard of Glock owners using
this type of bullet. The cost difference is not really that much more for a FMJ and you don't take the chance of lining your barrel with lead. I only
reload with FMJ. This is my opinion on this subject.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
723 Posts
Thanks G-23, always appreciate all opinions. EvilD, do you stay with mid-range from the recommended load with plated?
I load them for my 34 to a PF of 127, which is is just over 1000 fps, another guy I shoot with loads to 170 pf (this is for ISPC)and is pushing almost 1400 fps, they suffer accuracy at that speed, but don't lead the barrel and they are fine with a compensator . If you want to push them faster you can get extra thick they just came out it, but they are the same price as jacketed. Teh reason I use them is because the indoor range we use doesn't allow jacketed but plated is fine. Probably be the last batch I use tho because I just started casting my own and will eventually start moly coating them.
Price wise, it depends on how much you shoot, if you shoot 1000 rounds a year, its not a big difference, if you shoot 1000 rounds a month, it adds up real fast.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,460 Posts
Been using plated bullets for years, and I love them.

The only downsides I am aware of are:
1. Not many load data sheets are made for plated bullets
2. I've been told I shouldn't push them to max velocities due to the tendency of the plating to scrape off in the bore

But then again, no problem since I don't need max velocities for range ammo...generally.

When I use Berry's plated Flatpoint Hollow Base, I push them to max velocities and I use them in my G26 for steel targets. The center of balance (due to the hollow base) is moved forward on the bullet, ensuring a more consistent and stable trajectory. They are actually better than regular FMJ for competition targets, IMHO.

Cheers!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
That seems to be the problem, finding load data. I am loading for the range as well so I don't need to be near the maximum velocity. Thanks for all the input, just starting out and want to get it right. I'm sure my questions seem stupid to you guys that have been doing it for years. I truly appreciate your opinions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,460 Posts
Richard Lee's book, Modern Reloading, actually has load data for plated bullets.

That, and a reliable chrony (I use the RCBS AmmoMaster Chrony), ensure that my loads remain within safe pressures at velocities I am aiming for.

Hope that helps!
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top