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Hello, I'm about to sell my Glock 37 45 gap to a friend. How does the waiting period work in a private party transaction? I'm clueless. Thanks in advance
 

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manilalite said:
Hello, I'm about to sell my Glock 37 45 gap to a friend. How does the waiting period work in a private party transaction? I'm clueless. Thanks in advance
Don't think you got to worry about any of that in a private party sale.
 

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It depends on the state so check your laws. When I lived in Michigan I had to get a slip signed at the police station with some info on it
 

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I'm not sure what state you are in but here in Missouri a private party sale requires no paperwork or waiting period. It's a quick exchange of money and firearms. You will of course want a bill if sale just for piece of mind incase he decides to shoot up a 7/11.
 

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manilalite said:
Hello, I'm about to sell my Glock 37 45 gap to a friend. How does the waiting period work in a private party transaction? I'm clueless. Thanks in advance
In PA all handguns need to be transferred at an FFL, long guns don't require this.
 

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Since you live in Los Angeles, California, these are a few of the laws you will need to know:

I want to sell a gun to another person, i.e., a private party transfer. Am I required to conduct the transaction through a licensed California firearms dealer?
Yes. Firearm sales must be conducted through a fully licensed California firearms dealer. Failure to do so is a violation of California law. The buyer (and seller, in the event that the; buyer is denied), must meet the normal firearm purchase and delivery requirements. "Antique firearms," as defined in Section 921(a)(16) of Title 18 of the United States Code, and curio or relic rifles/shotguns, defined in Section 178.11 of Title 27 of the Code of Federal Regulations that are over 50 years old, are exempt from this requirement.

Firearms dealers are required to process private party transfers upon request. Firearms dealers may charge a fee not to exceed $10 per firearm for conducting a private party transfer. Example:

For a private party transfer involving one or more handguns, the total allowable fees, including the DROS, safety, and dealer transfer fees, are not to exceed $35.00 for the first handgun and $31.00 for each additional handgun involved in the same transaction.
For private party transfers involving one or more long guns, or a private party transfer involving one handgun, the total allowable fees, including the DROS, safety, and dealer transfer fees, are not to exceed $35.00. The dealer may charge an additional dealer-service fee of$10.00 per each additional firearm transferred.

How is the waiting period for firearm purchases calculated?
The waiting period for the purchase or transfer of a firearm is ten (10) 24-hour periods from the date and time of the submission of the DROS information to the DOJ.


If you want to read more, here is the link to the Office of the Attorney General FAQ..

http://oag.ca.gov/firearms/pubfaqs#14
 
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