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Discussion Starter #1
I searched for previous posts but it seems to me that this topic doesn't exist, so here I am :)

Anyone shooting with pellet rifles just to have fun?
Lately I'm trying to learn what the market is offering, I got a small field 30' from here (about 1500 square meters) and I could use the rifle there.

Just curious maybe someone of you like to play with those rifles!

Fab
 

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Maybe I should say "air rifles"? I don't know if there's some difference between "air rifles" and "pellet rifles"...
 

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I have 2 Stoeger pellet rifles, .177 and .22 cal. They're inexpensive breakbarrel designs, so each pellet gets loaded manually, but no need for an air pump or CO2 cartridges. I put "real" scopes on them, hand me downs when I upgraded a couple rifles (buy twice, sigh once, cry once :D) and enjoy them when I just want to spend 20-30 minutes getting some trigger therapy, staying home. They are much more accurate than I expected, and hitting 12 oz. can sized targets at 70 yards is near 100%.

https://www.pyramydair.com/
 

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Regarding scopes for 'springer' air rifles...


"If you shoot a spring airgun, you will need to choose a scope that matches the recoil rating of your airgun."

"Scopes designed for firearms have optics anchored to handle the backward movement of the recoil. Airgun scopes require that optics be anchored to handle the two-way recoil generated by the mainspring. But there is a catch to this feature so check our recoil ratings very carefully. Even though a manufacturer may rate a scope for airguns, it may not handle all spring airguns. Some airgun rated scopes are designed to handle only light recoil airguns while others are built to handle the medium and high recoil spring airguns. All rifles shown on our site will show a Recoil Rating of Low, Medium, High or No Recoil. All scopes will also show whether they are made for Low, Medium or High Recoil rifles."

"Anchored optics refer to optics that are anchored front and back to handle the forward and backward recoil caused by the mainspring's movement. Recoil in a spring airgun is different than recoil in a firearm in the sense that it isn't only the amount of recoil that matters, but the direction of the recoil as well. Mainsprings cause an airgun to recoil backward and forward while firearms only recoil in a backward direction. It is this two-direction recoil that can cause damage to non-airgun rated scopes."

"Scopes designed for firearms have optics anchored to handle the backward movement of the recoil. Airgun scopes require that optics be anchored to handle the two-way recoil generated by the mainspring. But there is a catch to this feature so check our recoil ratings very carefully. Even though a manufacturer may rate a scope for airguns, it may not handle all spring airguns. Some airgun rated scopes are designed to handle only light recoil airguns while others are built to handle the medium and high recoil spring airguns. All rifles shown on our site will show a Recoil Rating of Low, Medium, High or No Recoil. All scopes will also show whether they are made for Low, Medium or High Recoil rifles."

Best regards,

Bob
 

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3-7x32 center-point on the .177
Bushnell AR-223 3-9x40 on the .22...they've been great. The Bushnell survived my mini 14, while my Nikons got trashed by it. Leupold on it now.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
3-7x32 center-point on the .177
Bushnell AR-223 3-9x40 on the .22...they've been great. The Bushnell survived my mini 14, while my Nikons got trashed by it. Leupold on it now.
Here the first "problems" for me :)

You mentioned .177 that I see it's what we call 4.5 mm, the .22 cal should be 5.5 mm; what I'm looking at is the 4.5 mm.

Here we got two basic difference market:
rifles with power that's < 7,5 Joule => everybody over 18 years old can buy one of them;
rifles with power that's > 7,5 Joule => you gotta have a gun license like mine.

Usually the rifles that are under or equal to 7,5J are license free and 4,5 mm.
To have fun I don't think I need > 7,5J rifle so, in addition to keep the price reasonable, I'd like to buy a no-license rifle.

As you and Bob are talking about I see that a scope is probably needed but this is another "film" as we're used to say :)
 

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I was given a .177 air rifle a number of years ago. A simple break barrel type, nothing fancy but, as a family, we have loads of fun shooting it. if you can get Firebird exploding targets it's even better! You can get these for shotgun, rifle and air rifle. I'm even thinking about buying one with a magazine.

 

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Used to have a decent Gamo Hunter; don't recall the model. It was great, but the kids naturally boogered it up years ago and I never replaced it.
 

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Fab, the 4.5mm is fun and definitely "good enough" to enjoy. The cross-point scope I have on mine was cheap, but a definite improvement in my opinion over what often comes with an air rifle/pellet gun. It survived a couple seasons on a 5.56 bolt gun, and now 4th season on my Stoeger.
 

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I've got a Gamo,I bought it to control the red skwerls,the yard was over run with them,I have a large walnut tree in the middle of my yard.I paid about 100 bucks for it.Came with a scope.I think it gets like 1600fps.I got all the red skwerls,didnt see a single one all last summer.Sighted it at 25 yds and have had a number of kills at up to 50 yds.
 

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They make break barrel air rifles with 10-round rotary magazines now. A little wonky and less durable, but much quicker follow up shots.
 

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It would help if we knew where you were. Obviously not in the US. We still use caliber and there are very few if any restrictions on air rifles for ownership.
If you are looking to plink, the .177 (4.5) or the 22 (5.5) will do you just fine. The smaller will be a fun inexpensive target rifle. This will also use BB's if you have those. It can also be used for small animals if you choose. I wouldn't go larger than a rabbit, but that is my limit.
The .22 caliber will do much the same, but the pellets are a bit more, but so is the payoff. I keep one of these beside the back door. We have lots of vermin prowling the property. Raccoons, opossums, armadillos (even mine is a little light for these if not under 20 feet, assorted unwanted snakes, and other critters.
All that to say, I have a Crossman in 177 cal and a Benjamin in 22 cal. After getting the Benjamin, the Crossman lives in the closet. A very adequate toy, but the larger pellet does more for utility.
Check one of these out. https://www.midwayusa.com/product/2083169014 I get +/- 1000 FPS from a 14.2 gr pellet. I get ~850 fps from the heavies. The piston is the loudest part of the sound report after shooting it in. It isn't great at anything, but is very adequate at just about everything.
Now if you want to get into the real fun stuff, go with a 38 cal, (9mm+), 10 MM, or even more. These require special high pressure pumps to load up, but you usually get multiple shots per air charge. These are suitable for larger game, deer size and more. The are also not cheap, but if that is something you can own, why not.
Happy Shopping
 
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I use my son’s Daisy Powerline rifle on occasion for varmints near the house. I’ve noticed that opossums not only like like dog & cat food, but they like to get into the drip cup at the bottom of my propane grill.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Based on the links you guys gave to me I see that your stores have much more brands than what we have: Gamo, Weihrauch, Diana are probably the most sold here.
I'm oriented to see live a Weihrauch HW 977 and I'd like to get a spring version to keep things "simple", I'm reading good reviews on the 977: I've discovered a well supplied gun shop about 60' from my house so tomorrow afternoon I can touch the rifles with my hands, we'll see.
 

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I use my son’s Daisy Powerline rifle on occasion for varmints near the house. I’ve noticed that opossums not only like like dog & cat food, but they like to get into the drip cup at the bottom of my propane grill.
We got strong issues with doves here... :cool:
 

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Fab, there are 4 types of air rifles. Break barrel spring, break barrel spring/air assist, CO2 pneumatic's and PCP pneumatic's. Break barrel being the cheapest, PCP's the most expensive, bolt operated can easily go over $4,000. PCP's have to be pumped to over 3,000 psi, either by hand or using a scuba diving pre-filled tank. CO2 guns are too weak for hunting, ok for indoor practice, but very unreliable. Even though the product says over 1,600 fps for 177 guns, that's all hype. Actual chrono results are far less. And the fast pellets are also the lightest and least accurate. Generally speaking heavier pellets are most accurate. You may have to try several pellet weights to get the one super accurate your gun likes. The ideal velocity is around 800 fps. For squirrel depredation hunting, I used a RWS Diana Model 34 .177 cal single shot break barrel, with a 4x Center Point spring gun scope, 10.2 grain pellets for decades. Finally upgraded to a Game Swarm Fox 10 shot break barrel spring air assist in .22cal with a Gamo 4x spring gun scope running 14.3 grain pellets. Spring guns has to use spring gun rated scopes. My buddy uses a AirArms PCP (pre-charged pneumatic) high end sled gun ($5,000 with scope) with an 8x Zeiss running 16 grain pellets. It can shoot sub 1 MOA at one hundred yards. PCP's can use standard rifle scopes or dots.

If you intend of shooting doves, go with a .22cal. The 22's are inherently more accurate than the .177, sorta like a .45acp is more accurate than a 9mm, because of ballistic co-efficient.
 

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I've taken over 20 squirrels this season, from 18-38 ounces at 3-30 yards with the Gamo. Nearly all dead fall shots. Pellet gun ballistics are pretty lopey, so you need to sight in at different distances to know holdover. I know things are way more $$$ in Italy, but if you go with a break barrel, get a multi shot. You can waste allot of time single loading, during which time the squirrel or dove will move.

Good luck in your choice. By the way, I spend several months over the years at AerMacchi in Varese. Even got to tour the underground fighter trainer compound. Went to Milano or Lago Como or Switzerland every weekend. Hiked up to Sacre Monte and Campo Dei Fiori, saw the Last Supper wall in Milan and hiked up Duomo Di Milano. Best food in the word there! Love Branzino.

Ciao
 
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