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Brady, have you and your wife though about taking a class to bring you and her up to speed, on gun handling and marksmanship?

There are several out there, all across the country. Just food for thought.
 

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IMO if you are not comfortable carrying with one in the chamber then don't. I do keep one in the chamber but I do not have to be concerned with little ones getting into my firearms.
On the plus side of chambering a round, gun fights occur in very short periods of time. In a lot of scenarios the time it takes to rack the slide could be the difference between surviving and being dead. However, sometimes practical considerations outweigh tactical considerations. You have to come to terms with what you are comfortable with.
 

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I was reserved on the subject at first, but in reality, having one in the chamber is going to be the difference between life and death. In a simulation I watched, a man tried to stab a woman. With one in the chamber, she was stabbed twice while shooting the man three times. Without one in the chamber, she was stabbed more than three times + knocked to the ground, and not only never got a shot off, but never got a round chambered.

If you have a round chambered in your glock, the only way it is ever going to fire is if you pull the trigger. You could throw it across the room and it wont fire (unless your safeties are broken). If the gun is holstered properly then it should never fall out, and if its in the holster, the trigger is not able to be pulled by anyone
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Wolfgang2000 said:
Brady, have you and your wife though about taking a class to bring you and her up to speed, on gun handling and marksmanship?

There are several out there, all across the country. Just food for thought.
So far I have taken 2 classes - one for CCW, and another basic firearms training/instruction session. I'd like to also take a more tactical class perhaps focused more on self-defense. My wife is also planning to take some classes.
 

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I didn't carry with one in the chamber. I went from a pistol that had the standard thumb lever safety, to a gun that did not have a "safety" as I was used to and it made me nervous to chamber a round and carry it.

I'm still a bit nervous with the new .45, and it has the duck tail safety as well as the trigger safety switch, but it's only a couple days old and I haven't gotten used to carrying a bigger weapon yet. I will be chambering a round in this one in a few days.

From the time we had a daughter mobile and curious, we started gun safety with her. She was NEVER allowed to play with toy guns in our house because of the potential to "mix up" toys and real guns. We taught her to get an adult when she saw a gun laying around, toy or otherwise.

When she was about 6, we started taking her to outdoor ranges to go shooting with us. We taught her how to handle a gun, how to ask to have someone show her the empty chamber before handing her a gun, how to never accept a gun unless the slide was open and she could see it was empty, pistol and rifle.

We taught her to load a magazine and her first pistol was a Raven .25, that she learned to shoot, load, unload, and clean. She's now 14 and shoots my G17, as well as hubby's Springfield .45.

She's also shot my Ruger .22 LR, and her Daddy's AR15, but she finds rifles to be cumbersome and heavy. She's definitely a pistol girl. =)

Ironically, my sister hates guns...but she buys her kids toy guns to play with and lets them run around, pretending to shoot people or pets...sees nothing wrong with it. The first time my daughter did this, we PROMPTLY corrected her and she never did it again, but my sister thinks we're "too strict" and "toys are harmless".

In comparison, her kids freak out or get overly excited when they see us wearing our pistols, but my daughter is calm and blase about guns. The only time she shows any interest in them is when we're at the range. Any other time, she could care less, won't touch them unless we ask her to hold one while we're doing something, such as cleaning them, knows better than to pick one up without asking.
 

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TNFrank said:
Ditto, sounds a lot like what I did with my stepkids when my wife and I got married. Took them shooting, only had a 22lr at the time but it still did enough damage to some pieces of 2x4 that they got a clue that guns were NOT toys and not to be played with.
Taught my 3 grandsons that live here in Tennessee about guns too but since my younger grandson (he's only 2) didn't grow up around me he didn't get the lesson until he was here with his sister a couple weeks back on a visit from AZ.
I told the story but I'll tell it again. I'm in the habit of keeping my G30 on the end table next to me while I'm watching TV for those "just in case" moments. Well, I'm watching TV and he spots the gun and comes over to grab it. He got a stern talking too about not touching guns and if he finds one tell an adult. Then to drive the point home we went out back the next day and I shot a gallon jug full of water with an XTP hollow point. Jug jumped, water flew, ripped a nice hole in the jug, I think he got the message that guns are not toys and that you never point one at anything you're not willing to destroy.
It's funny how some folks try to hide their guns from the kids to "keep them safe" but all they're really doing is adding more mystery to them which makes the kids want to find them and play with them all that much more.
If you let them see the gun, show them what it will do and even unload it and let them hold it then they're curiosity is satisfied, they learn that they're not a toy to be played with and that they can do damage and that pretty much settles it for them from that point on.
Rather then trying to "kid proof" your gun it's better if you "Gun Proof" your kids.
How old were the boys when you taught them about guns, my 4 year old loves guns, I want educate them, but don't know what age is a good age to start.
 

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Lucian I started teaching my daughter about guns and gun safety when she was 2. She is now 3 and understands what all the parts are as well as if a gun is " hot". She won't touch a gun for love or money unless daddy says its ok and always tells us if she sees one that's not on daddy's hip. To the OP I remove the round from the chamber when I am home and use a solid good quality holster with good retention for those spontaneous moments.
 

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I started my daughter off when she was 2 or 3 by watching the NRA's Eddie Eagle gun saftey movie, you can probably get it on ebay. At that time I was teaching her to just not touch them. At about 4 we started talking about safe handling of firearms, and at 6 I started letting her handle some firearms as we would talk about gun safety rules. She's about to turn 7 and we are talking about going to the range sometime soon so she can shoot for the first time.

My son is 3 almost 4, and for more impulsive than my daughter so he may be stuck in the 'don't touch' mode a little longer than my daughter was.

I think it really depends alot on the individual child, some are ready for learning gun safety younger than others.
 

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If it goes boom or bang, I want to play with it!
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Usually it's the employer that puts the restrictions on people with regards to firearms
That's true, but I figured he knew about the policies of the company he works for since he was asking where he could find the laws.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
Sandie_Morehead said:
I didn't carry with one in the chamber. I went from a pistol that had the standard thumb lever safety, to a gun that did not have a "safety" as I was used to and it made me nervous to chamber a round and carry it.

I'm still a bit nervous with the new .45, and it has the duck tail safety as well as the trigger safety switch, but it's only a couple days old and I haven't gotten used to carrying a bigger weapon yet. I will be chambering a round in this one in a few days.

From the time we had a daughter mobile and curious, we started gun safety with her. She was NEVER allowed to play with toy guns in our house because of the potential to "mix up" toys and real guns. We taught her to get an adult when she saw a gun laying around, toy or otherwise.

When she was about 6, we started taking her to outdoor ranges to go shooting with us. We taught her how to handle a gun, how to ask to have someone show her the empty chamber before handing her a gun, how to never accept a gun unless the slide was open and she could see it was empty, pistol and rifle.

We taught her to load a magazine and her first pistol was a Raven .25, that she learned to shoot, load, unload, and clean. She's now 14 and shoots my G17, as well as hubby's Springfield .45.

She's also shot my Ruger .22 LR, and her Daddy's AR15, but she finds rifles to be cumbersome and heavy. She's definitely a pistol girl. =)

Ironically, my sister hates guns...but she buys her kids toy guns to play with and lets them run around, pretending to shoot people or pets...sees nothing wrong with it. The first time my daughter did this, we PROMPTLY corrected her and she never did it again, but my sister thinks we're "too strict" and "toys are harmless".

In comparison, her kids freak out or get overly excited when they see us wearing our pistols, but my daughter is calm and blase about guns. The only time she shows any interest in them is when we're at the range. Any other time, she could care less, won't touch them unless we ask her to hold one while we're doing something, such as cleaning them, knows better than to pick one up without asking.
Well done Sandie! I'm still working on it with my kids. They're somewhere in between.
 

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Hate to admit it- but things sure changed when the children moved out. Even more $$ to spend on guns/ammo.
Great points already stated. I had no auto loaders avail when critters were small- only wheel guns as it was easier to train them comfortably.
As for "one in the pipe", that's what makes Glock perfect. As long as one utilizes a quality holster, the gun is not going to fire all buy itself.
 

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I have never felt comfortable with one in the chamber. With my glock,I'm able to pull the slide back,fire relatively quickly.
That probably wouldn't have worked in this situation.

http://www.12newsnow.com/story/19253451/shotgun-robber-not-successful

I read about it on another site, posted by a friend of the guy.

This was the friend's explanation of how it happened-

Truck in the next parking space
Perp jumps out, throws down on him with a shotgun
Friend is seated with one foot inside his Jeep Cherokee
Keeps talking to perp and pushing shotgun barrel sideways
Says he's getting his wallet.
Pulls his Taurus 709 Slim from kidney carry
Fires once
Perps falls backwards, drops shotgun, jumps up and runs
 
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