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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am still relatively new to firearms and shooting. I really started getting serious about guns and shooting back in March and a little later received my CCW. I have been carrying now for just a little while, but I have not been able to get comfortable yet carrying my guns with one in the chamber in large part because my wife and myself worry about a higher potentIal for an accident happening in general or somehow with my 2 boys (7 and 10)...inadvertently climbing on me, etc. My two carry guns are a Glock 26 and Colt 1911 .45 ACP. Any advice or feedback would be appreciated.
 

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Carry on my friends!!!!
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With children around I 100% understand with your concern about keeping your firearm in condition one. But I would reccomend that you train racking your slide when you draw your firearm if you have the ability to do so.
 

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Load Bearing Wall
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If you have a good, high quality holster, with a high level of retention, there is really nothing to be concerned about. Police Officers deal with combative individuals as part of their job, and their holsters retain their sidearms just as they were designed to. I carried my 1911 in a Galco for years in Condition 1, with just a basic thumb break snap for retention. I don't think I would want to be rough housing with a 7 & 10 year old with mine strapped on though, somebody might get bumped in the noggin. I'd probably want to take it off for that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
GlockIt said:
With children around I 100% understand with your concern about keeping your firearm in condition one. But I would reccomend that you train racking your slide when you draw your firearm if you have the ability to do so.
That's good advice. I do practice that during some range sessions, but I should practice it more at home with some snap caps. Thanks.
 

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Glockin’ since 1993
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A good quality holster that covers the trigger. Plus a quick access vault when you get home. Educate the kids on firearms and safety.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
SeventiesWreckers said:
If you have a good, high quality holster, with a high level of retention, there is really nothing to be concerned about. Police Officers deal with combative individuals as part of their job, and their holsters retain their sidearms just as they were designed to. I carried my 1911 in a Galco for years in Condition 1, with just a basic thumb break snap for retention. I don't think I would want to be rough housing with a 7 & 10 year old with mine strapped on though, somebody might get bumped in the noggin. I'd probably want to take it off for that.
I have a White Hat tactical cut and a N82 for CCW. Both holsters secure the firearms pretty well and kind of "snap" in to position and require a slight twist and pull of the gun to retrieve it from the holster. I agree with your comment and wouldn't intentionally play rough with the boys while carrying, but sometimes things happen "spontaneously". LOL
 

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Load Bearing Wall
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I have a White Hat tactical cut and a N82 for CCW. Both holsters secure the firearms pretty well and kind of "snap" in to position and require a slight twist and pull of the gun to retrieve it from the holster. I agree with your comment and wouldn't intentionally play rough with the boys while carrying, but sometimes things happen "spontaneously". LOL
Yes, I know. And going from not carrying, to carrying, does present a few issues for all of us. You have to find a away that works for you & yours. If carrying the Glock without a round chambered, or the 1911 decocked, puts everyone more at ease, then that might be the way to go. On the upside, I'd rather have mine with me unchambered, than not have it at all. I'd make sure to practice with that in mind though. Hate to forget I'm running on empty.
 

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A good quality holster that covers the trigger. Plus a quick access vault when you get home. Educate the kids on firearms and safety.
+1 to this.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the feedback guys. I definitely have been educating the boys on firearms and firearms safety, because they are extremely interested and curious with anything to do with guns. I have a good bedside quick access safe as well as a larger safe for more guns and ammo, etc. I guess I still have to chew on this a bit, I would prefer to carry with one in the chamber ready to go, but I still have some reservations.
 

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If your preference is to (eventually) carry with a live round in the tube, incorporate snap caps in your carry for a little while. Put a snap cap in the pipe, and a full magazine of your personal defense ammo. It gives you the chance to see if you can get comfortable carrying a live round in the chamber without any risk of a negligent discharge. If you hear a click, you just got an imaginary hole in your leg.

Just remember, you still need to rack the slide shoud you need to draw while carrying this way, but it will help build confidence with the firearm's condition.

This is how I transitioned to carrying a Glock from a previous gun that had a manual safety - had the same reservations as you do. After carrying a snap cap chambered for a couple of days, I switched to a personal defense round in the pipe with confidence.

If you find yourself carrying a snap cap in the chamber for more than a few days, may want to switch back to an empty chamber. But I think you'll find condition 1 to your liking.
 

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Glad to here the concern about carrying around children. When I first started carrying my Glock I would carry around the house with an empty mag and the slide racked to see it I heard the dreaded click of the trigger being pressed by accident. It only took a couple of days with out hearing anything to figure out that my carry rig was safe. Then I carried around the house with just a full mag, then progressed to one in the pipe.

Take your time and build up confidence, don't flip flop back and forth as this may lead to forgetting to either cock the gun or a ND because you forgot that one was in the pipe. The end result is to carry fully loaded with confidence in your training and equipment. Good luck
 

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Get a good holster and carrying condition one is not a problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Those are great suggestions CountryMick and Levelcross! I will definitely try that to transition. Thanks.
 

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A good quality holster that covers the trigger. Plus a quick access vault when you get home. Educate the kids on firearms and safety.
+++1

I wouldn't hurt to familiarize them with firearms now. When the wife and I got married we had 4 kids between us ranging from to 16.

Being that we were both LEO's Loaded guns around the house was a way of life. One day we took all the kids and all the guns and let them shoot every one of them.

First shot by me was a hot 45 HP into a cantaloupe. Impression made. after we ran out of ammo their curiosity was satisfied. Rules were laid out right there in front of all the kids. We never really had any problems after that.

The daughter use to bring suitors home to shot them some of my duty guns.

Today we have a lot of things like little bedside safes, and biometric reader that give a person instant access. These things weren't around in 1980. So we had to do it the old fashion way.

I should add that I've always carried my guns hot. fully loaded including one in the chamber. a proper holster and your finger off the trigger.

I never played with any of the kids with a gun on.
 

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First shot by me was a hot 45 HP into a cantaloupe. Impression made. after we ran out of ammo their curiosity was satisfied. Rules were laid out right there in front of all the kids. We never really had any problems after that.
Ditto, sounds a lot like what I did with my stepkids when my wife and I got married. Took them shooting, only had a 22lr at the time but it still did enough damage to some pieces of 2x4 that they got a clue that guns were NOT toys and not to be played with.
Taught my 3 grandsons that live here in Tennessee about guns too but since my younger grandson (he's only 2) didn't grow up around me he didn't get the lesson until he was here with his sister a couple weeks back on a visit from AZ.
I told the story but I'll tell it again. I'm in the habit of keeping my G30 on the end table next to me while I'm watching TV for those "just in case" moments. Well, I'm watching TV and he spots the gun and comes over to grab it. He got a stern talking too about not touching guns and if he finds one tell an adult. Then to drive the point home we went out back the next day and I shot a gallon jug full of water with an XTP hollow point. Jug jumped, water flew, ripped a nice hole in the jug, I think he got the message that guns are not toys and that you never point one at anything you're not willing to destroy.
It's funny how some folks try to hide their guns from the kids to "keep them safe" but all they're really doing is adding more mystery to them which makes the kids want to find them and play with them all that much more.
If you let them see the gun, show them what it will do and even unload it and let them hold it then they're curiosity is satisfied, they learn that they're not a toy to be played with and that they can do damage and that pretty much settles it for them from that point on.
Rather then trying to "kid proof" your gun it's better if you "Gun Proof" your kids.
 

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TNF "Rather than trying to "kid proof" your gun it's better if you "Gun Proof" your kids."


Well said SIR well said, education is the key factor to gun safety, not locking them up all of the time, not hiding them but teaching proper gun handling techniques. Repetition from training can and should start at an early age, my dad started me on a .22 Lr rifle when I was 5 and a .410 shot gun when I was 10. It was an educational reward for me, if I was good all week we went shooting on Saturday morning.
 

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Agree with "Gun Proofing" the kids, but the second part to that is always maintaining positive control of your weapon. Kids are variables.

When I'm at home, my kids know not to approach me on my strong side while carrying, because they will usually jump on me or try to horse around. If I'm going to wrestle or horse around with them, I'll take it off and secure it. I will not leave it out.

Concur with using a proper holster. Maintaining positive control (interpret that as you see fit) is the key. For me maintaining control means eliminating all variables...the weapon is either on me (one in the pipe... btw) or locked up.
 

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A good quality holster that covers the trigger. Plus a quick access vault when you get home. Educate the kids on firearms and safety.
I agree with both. I also wouldn't be afraid to spend a little more money on quality. You thought enough to buy a couple of nice guns. They deserve a nice home That will last them for years. Nothing worse than seeing someone carrying a gun in an old tube sock tied off to their twine belt. A little KY humor.
Kids are naturally curious. If you can hide it, they can find it. I would hazard to say that many gun tragedies involving children happen when they have no training or exposure to firearms and find their parents gun. It's an exciting new thing. Training takes a lot (not all) of that curiosity out. I have been working with my Daughter since she was 4.5. She's 9 now so I will sign her up for the 4H league in January. Even at that my gun is always under my immediate control or in a mini-vault or safe.
I always carry one in the chamber. I can't predict the circumstances under which I may need it. One less thing to do may be the difference between going home and going to meet your maker. Most accidents with adults happen because they broke 2 cardinal rules. They had their finger on the trigger and the gun was pointed in an unsafe direction.
IMO
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Thanks again for all of the great feedback. Since I finally took the plunge back in March into gun ownership I am consumed with interest in learning as much as I can about all aspects (safety, training, history, legal, sport, etc.). This forum has been such a great resource, and I'm very impressed at the kinship that fellow firearm owners have with each other.
 
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