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My first day at the range with my own handgun, the Glock 17. It was a great learning and training experience, from 8 am to 5 pm. This was the USCCA basic hand gun safety training, with class instruction in the morning, and several hours on the outdoor range in the afternoon.

Have to admit that shooting my Glock rattled me a little bit in the beginning, despite my double ear protection (Axil GS and Walker muffs). The big bang coupled with the recoil is quite something. I am still a newbie to guns. And following all the instructions and processing everything in time is something that needs practice. I made a couple of mistakes.

That said it was fun. This was at the Richmond Rod and Gun Club, in Richmond, CA, which is approx. 30 minutes away from Oakland and/or San Francisco.

My instructors, Reggie and Mike:

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The target - my virtual bad guy is pretty dead I think. Not too difficult because he didn't fire back. But the drills can be difficult.


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Get Peltor Tac 6's neckband model for $67 on Amazon. They are great, even for a comp'd AR15. The Axil's do not have a quick enough response time.

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I wore the Axil's under my Walker Razer's, both electronically enhanced, so I didn't have to take them off and was still able to hear the instructors at all times. Maybe a bit overkill and after a couple of hours it's not very comfortable, but this is one of the things I'll have to figure out. The Axil's are advertised as having -29dB sound suppression which is technically better than anything else. But if the ear plugs come out the sound suppression quickly goes down.
 

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By the way, Richmond puts on some righteous matches, including the Golden Bullet Area 2 match.

Yeah, it's a nice range, and not too far from where I live. I am thinking of joining them as associate member. There is another range which is closer to me physically, only 15 minutes away, in San Leandro. I'll check them all out and see what it's like. I do need a lot of practice, that much is for sure.
 

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9mm is not much recoil and not much bang for the buck. You will need to shoot enough rounds to feel absolutely comfortable with your new firearm and fully expect what it delivers. I once took a break from shooting and it took a few hundred rounds to feel normal again.
Enjoy!!!
Thanks!

Yeah, I plan to go back this week. I need to get this routine down until I am totally comfortable with my gun, range practices, how my ear protection works, what's the best time to visit the range, and so on.

I work out every day, whether it is running, cycling, the gym. I'm not exactly 18 anymore but I try to stay in shape. My philosophy is that it is probably the same thing with guns. Just need to get into the groove and make this a routine thing.
 

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This afternoon I went to a local range, the San Leandro Rifle and Pistol Range. This is both an indoor and outdoor range. See link below.

This range is only 15 minutes away from where I live, so it is very convenient for me. Easy parking, but if you visit this range, one tip: put ear protection in before you get out of your car, because the outdoor range is close to the parking lot with no walls or sound barriers in between them.

This was the first time alone at the range, and I was a little bit nervous and apprehensive about breaking any range rules or doing something stupid. But the range safety officer was very nice and welcoming. I explained that I was a gun newbie and he explained the rules, asked whether I wanted to use the indoor or outdoor range, and afterwards gave me tips about accuracy, dry fire practice shooting at home, etc. I chose indoor, since it has a cable thing that allows the target to be closer or farther away.

I fired 80 rounds, with the target at various distances. Hit the target most all times, although accuracy goes down when it's farther away. Well doh, suppose that is normal.

Have to admit that I am still a little nervous around firearms, and my hands were a little bit shaky handling the Glock. And the banging from my own gun and the other people on the range rattled me a little bit. Is that normal? Will it get better over time?

Thanks!



 

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Luckily it's not an SUV, and just a somber looking AMG sedan. Most people wouldn't even know there's a 5.5L V8 bi-turbo under hood with 650 hp.

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Very nice.

But since we are getting off topic, I am of the opinion that the best Mercedes Benzes were manufactured back in the 1950 to say late 1980s.

They were beautiful. They were all mechanical. They were easy to maintain and repair, and virtually indestructible. Here's the W126 I drove way back in the Netherlands. This is how she looked after a hail storm with hail pellets as big as oranges.

Before emigrating to the US, I sold it to a friend of a friend. Many years later, he sold it to a German couple.

It's still running fine these days.


Automotive parking light Tire Automotive side marker light Wheel Car
 

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"Will it get better over time?"
Most people improve and get more comfortable with their firearms and all the conditions of shooting, noise, recoil, etc. in proportion to the amount of time they practice. A few folks never get over being uncomfortable with or around firearms and eventually just quit shooting.
It sometimes helps to have a shooting partner to go to the range with. Especially if they're on or near the same level of experience. This gives you someone to discuss technique, results, and any concerns you might have with. Plus a little good-natured competition can be fun.
You also might want to double up on your ear protection. If you're using earmuffs try adding a set of foam ear plugs under them.
Ride Safe. Dr.Tramp..............
Thanks ... yes, I used Axil in ear plugs doubled up with Walker Razer muffs (both electronic). Guess I need a bit more time on the range to get used to the noise.

The range officer said it takes a while to get comfortable with all the noise around on a range. The outdoor range is a bit less noisy.
 

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As someone who is also relatively new to the forum and pistols, yes you do get used to the recoil, noise and your overall surroundings but it does take time.

I wouldn't say I'm completely comfortable at the range but I feel like that (extra) awareness does keep me from getting into bad habits.

Also agree with the good Dr, it's more fun to go with a partner.
Thanks. I'm a loner by nature and like to do things by myself, so I can plan it whenever I have time, depending on my daily schedule.

I'll go back early next week, avoiding the busy weekend.

I learned a lot of things over time by being patient and persistent, and practice. As a musician I know from experience that you cannot buy an instrument and expect to be good at it after playing it a few times. You may know how the strings are tuned and basic technique, but it takes years of diligent practice to become any good.
 

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PR, what's your instrument?
Guitar, classical guitar to be more precise. That's the instrument with the nylon strings, think of Andres Segovia, John Williams (not the film composer, but the equally famous guy from Australia), Pepe Romero etc. I fell in love with it when I was in my teens and studied at the conservatory of music back in the 1980s to get a teaching degree. Figured out pretty quickly that while I was talented, I was not superstar talented, so I enrolled first in business school and then law school to have a shot at a money making career. That was all possible back in the day in the Netherlands, for not a lot of $$$ in college tuition, though it meant no partying for me ... it was always studying either music or law. But I loved it, and it got me a very good education and a great job after I graduated. Still love music and still love the classical guitar, but these days my day job is in law, and my night job is music (as a composer).
 

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Nice, my wife is a professional Harpist. Bachelor of Arts in Church Organ for a private university and a Theory Masters from the Royal School of Church Music in England. Took up the harp after 30 years of church jobs (they pay nothing).
Nice, the harp is one of my favorite instruments. It's also widely misunderstood by (beginning) composers, where they write something that is easily playable on the piano but very difficult on a harp (hint: the harp is not a piano flipped on its side).
 

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Yup, much harder to play than our local university organ...

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The harp looks deceptively simple, but isn't - your wife can probably tell a story or two about this.

A violin is a very simple instrument at face ... piece of wood with f holes in it, four strings, a bow. But getting to the level of Hillary Hahn requires a lifetime of hours of daily practice and lots of talent. And that is true for many instruments.
 

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PR, what language is this? Klingon, Romulan, Predator?

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LOL, too funny. That's a chart of a piece of music in F major, with sustained pedal notes and then arpeggiated patterns in the treble clef. The slur (wiggly thing in the treble clef) indicates that the notes should be played 'together', although on a harp you don't really have a choice as everything rings unless you dampen it (and then you have to indicate it with a dampen sign). Nice engraving by the way.
 

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I went back to the same range in San Leandro today, by the way, and I was less nervous and jittery. The safety range officer is Brian, really nice guy, very welcoming.

I had a plan: fire 80 rounds in total, starting out at the longest distance (20 yards which is approx 20 meters) to see how well I did. After firing 10 rounds I brought the paper target back, to see how I did. Not too terrible, but I noticed I tend to fire a little bit to the left. I marked the bullet holes with a black marker as "1" and then rolled the target back to the 20 yard line, and fired the second 10 rounds. After rolling the paper target back I marked those with "2", and I two more 10 round sessions. I noticed that every time I got a little bit better, some hitting the bulls eye.

It's a process or a journey ... 1. I need to get comfortable with the bangs and everything 2. I need to get accurate at close and longer distance and 3. I need to make this a routine workout as I will.

I'm still not sure whether I like guns but I chose to buy one, and now I got to live with it.
 

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Shooting to the left is common and usually means you need to work on your grip.

"I'm still not sure whether I like guns but I chose to buy one, and now I got to live with it"
Even if you eventually decide you don't like firearms and decide to give them up at least you now know something about them and those that own and use them.
Now when you're at some high falootin Bay Area social event and someone starts in with the usual evil guns and gun owners BS you can shock them with some actual facts. ;)
In the meantime you're working at becoming competent with yours instead just sticking in a drawer which is more than a lot of folks do. Congrats. :)
Ride Safe. Dr.Tramp....................
LOL

I'm not going to be at any high flying Bay Area social event. They don't want me, because I am not rich or famous.

Even if I were invited, I'd probably politely decline. I don't care for socializing.

That said, I do like the range in San Leandro. They cater to anyone, even gun noobs like me. That's the kind of party I like.
 

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The Glock 17 is about as mild a 9mm as you can buy. Your shot pattern tells you that you're afraid of the bang and recoil. Why are you taking up pistol training? On the range you can wear ear protection, in an actual situation where you'd have to actually use it, the ear protection isn't there, and you'll get spooked. If you don't love the smell of gun powder in the morning, don't get aroused by the sound of gunfire, then this sport is not for you. If you want to keep it for protection, then 911 would be a better option. But no one should consider a firearm if they're innately afraid of it because it won't change, and there's nothing wrong with it. Uvalde showed that even a gaggle of police officers were never made to carry a firearm. Guns are not the remedy against fear and anxiety.
I went back to the range yesterday, and noticed I was much less rattled by the noise and the bang. It's probably just a matter of getting used to it. I don't I'll ever really enjoy it but who knows. it's not a sport for me, it's a means of self defense, so I just want to be as good as I can be. Yes 911 is the first go to and I love my local OPD but if somebody comes kicking down my door it'll take them some time to get here, by which time there's a good chance I will be dead or seriously injured. I'd rather shoot back and have the OPD over to investigate the details.
 
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