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Actually you do, otherwise there is nothing to absorb the energy from the firing pin and it will eventually blow out the breach face. I have seen this many times, especially in competition, where shooters tend to dry fire thousands of times.

As far as Leatham's video, that is still wasted on most experienced shooters, let alone brand new newbies. Get thru you basic gun safety class first, then practice simple drills to get your fundamentals (gundamentals) down: stance, grip, sight picture and trigger control. Followed by transitions and movement. Consider shooting competition next, USPSA/IDPA or Steel Challenge (SCSA). Then look at Leatham's video and you will understand.

"Learn how to jerk the trigger without moving the gun. It's that simple, it's just hard to do"

All the Grand Masters will tell you the same thing.



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Actually you don't. Glock says you don't, every person I know says you don't and I've probably dry fired my Glock 19 50,000 time without a snap cap.

And this guy has never shot before and that video just helps him understand. We are not all highly experienced grand master shooters like you.
 

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Actually you don't. Glock says you don't, every person I know says you don't and I've probably dry fired my Glock 19 50,000 time without a snap cap.

And this guy has never shot before and that video just helps him understand. We are not all highly experienced grand master shooters like you.
Actually I did fire a Glock and took a safety class, but many years ago (10 years? can't remember). Only once though, couple of hours and then on the range. Much to my surprise I was a pretty good shot apparently, got all shots within the circle (?) even at the longer distance. Don't ask me how long that was, can't remember.

But aside from whether dry firing damages your Glock, the other thing I need to practice is getting rounds into the magazine, pull back the slide after I dry fire and see how they pop out, etc. etc. Inserting cartridges into a magazine is not easy (and the plastic thingie that came with the Glock is totally useless, or am I missing something?) but I bought two speedloaders, the maglula and the Ludex. I'm trying to figure out which works easiest, both work well. The Ludex has a rubber stop at the bottom which makes it easy to firmly plant it on a flat surface like a kitchen counter, and then quickly insert the cartridges. Doing that over and over again is also training, right?
 

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Actually I did fire a Glock and took a safety class, but many years ago (10 years? can't remember). Only once though, couple of hours and then on the range. Much to my surprise I was a pretty good shot apparently, got all shots within the circle (?) even at the longer distance. Don't ask me how long that was, can't remember.

But aside from whether dry firing damages your Glock, the other thing I need to practice is getting rounds into the magazine, pull back the slide after I dry fire and see how they pop out, etc. etc. Inserting cartridges into a magazine is not easy (and the plastic thingie that came with the Glock is totally useless, or am I missing something?) but I bought two speedloaders, the maglula and the Ludex. I'm trying to figure out which works easiest, both work well. The Ludex has a rubber stop at the bottom which makes it easy to firmly plant it on a flat surface like a kitchen counter, and then quickly insert the cartridges. Doing that over and over again is also training, right?
I never heard of the Ludex.
The Glock loader is ok you just need to do it right on a firm surface. I’ve got a Lula and it’s the best one I’ve found for pistols.
 

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New 10 round mags are hard to load, so just put 9 rounds in. When not shooting, leave them loaded and the spring will relax. 17 rounders do not have that problem.
 

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From the Washington Post this morning:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/2022/06/24/house-approves-gun-bill/

The House of Representatives passed significant gun violence legislation on Friday aimed at curbing the frequency of mass shootings in the United States, ending the measure’s quick trip through Congress. It now heads to President Biden for his signature to make it law.

Following Senate action Thursday night, House passage of the Bipartisan Safer Communities Act broke an almost 30-year logjam in Washington on the contentious and emotional issue of gun rights. The metastasizing divisions that have separated Republicans and Democrats on the issue since the passage of the 1994 assault weapons ban have prevented meaningful changes to acquiring and retaining firearms for those who are not law-abiding citizens.
The House took the noteworthy step on the same day that the Supreme Court, across the street from the U.S. Capitol, released its historic decision to overturn abortion rights as established in Roe v. Wade, painting a dramatic tableau in Washington. Democrats clapped, smiled and linked arms after the gun measure passed the House, a striking departure from their earlier grim faces.

The gun legislation was the result of negotiations by a handful of Republican and Democratic senators, led by Sens. Chris Murphy (D-Conn.) and John Cornyn (R-Tex.), in the wake of recent mass shootings in Uvalde, Tex., and Buffalo.
In addition to providing funding for mental health services and school security initiatives, the legislation expands criminal background checks for some gun buyers, bars a larger group of domestic-violence offenders from purchasing firearms and funds programs that would allow authorities to seize guns from troubled individuals.
The bill passed the House overwhelmingly along party lines, 234 to 193, with no Democratic defections. Fourteen Republicans voted in favor, including Rep. Tony Gonzales (R-Tex.), who represents Uvalde, the small city that is now the infamous home of the second-largest mass school shooting after the one in Newtown, Conn., almost a decade before.

Democrats were seen hugging Rep. Lucy McBath (D-Ga.), who ran for Congress after her son, Jordan Davis, was shot and killed following a dispute over loud music at a gas station. They were congratulating her after provisions she supported made it into the bipartisan package.
McBath audibly sobbed on the House floor after Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) handed her a piece of paper with the final vote tally, leading McBath to gently place her head on Pelosi’s shoulder as they embraced.
“With this bipartisan package, we take the first steps to fight back on behalf of the American people, who desperately want new measures to keep communities safe in the high numbers in the polling,” Pelosi said on the House floor. “To those who lacked the courage to join in this work, I say your political survival is insignificant compared to the survival of our children.”

The Senate approved the measure, which was agreed to by 20 bipartisan senators, late Thursday. Fifteen Republican senators joined all Senate Democrats, marking a historic and rarely seen agreement across party lines in an equally divided Senate. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) supported the bill, while the National Rifle Association opposed it.

“Behind the facade and the contrived talking points of safety, school security and mental health, this is a gun control bill,” the NRA said Friday.
The package is being sent to Biden’s desk one month to the day after an 18-year-old killed 19 children and two teachers at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde. The tragic loss of life shook the nation as it was already coping with a mass shooting at a grocery store in Buffalo that left 10 dead.

The twin incidents influenced Rep. Chris Jacobs (R-N.Y.), a father of young daughters who was born and raised in Buffalo, to break with his party and come out in support of banning assault weapons and limiting high-capacity magazines, among other measures. The move appeared to have hurt him politically, prompting him to announce a week later that he would not seek reelection, after he lost significant GOP support.
Other Republicans who are retiring joined Jacobs in passing the measure, including Reps. John Katko (N.Y.), Fred Upton (Mich.), Anthony Gonzalez (Ohio) and Adam Kinzinger (Ill.). Rep. Tom Rice (S.C.), who lost his primary race, backed it. Vulnerable GOP Reps. Brian Fitzpatrick (Pa.), Peter Meijer (Mich.) and Maria Elvira Salazar (Fla.), plus several Republicans in the Ohio delegation — including Reps. Steve Chabot, Michael R. Turner and David Joyce — also voted in support.
And in the most surprising defection from her party, Rep. Liz Cheney, the Wyoming Republican facing a heated primary challenge in August, also backed the measure, meaning she will probably face attacks in her conservative Western state over this issue as well as her prominent role on the committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol. She has been working to win over Democratic voters ahead of her primary.

“As a mother and a constitutional conservative, I’m proud to support this sensible bill that will protect our children and limit violence without infringing on law-abiding citizens’ Second Amendment rights. Nothing in the bill restricts the rights of responsible gun owners. Period,” Cheney said in a statement.
Cheney aims to recruit crossover Democrats in her primary
Her office also noted that the legislation had received the backing of the Fraternal Order of Police and the National Sheriffs’ Association, groups the GOP often turns to before considering how to vote on legislation.
The legislation is modest compared with what Biden had asked of Congress, including banning assault weapons and raising the age to purchase a firearm from 18 to 21. Neither are in the compromise package.

The bill does, however, direct millions to increase mental health services and school security measures, which Republicans have championed as the best ways to address school shootings instead of tougher measures pushed by Democrats. The measure also expands criminal background checks for some gun buyers, and bars a larger group of domestic-violence offenders from being able to purchase firearms as part of language aimed at what is known as the “boyfriend loophole.” It also funds programs that would allow authorities to seize guns from troubled individuals.

The package faced less resistance from both parties in the Senate than in the House, where Republicans said the bill does not go far enough in expanding school safety and shamed Democrats for arguing that more laws would eliminate future school shootings.
“I’ll tell you what saves lives — the decision we got from the Supreme Court today saves lives. This bill takes life away from law-abiding citizens,” Rep. Jim Jordan (R-Ohio) responded to Pelosi, referencing the Supreme Court abortion decision.

A small number of progressives initially had reservations about the legislation, citing concerns over funding police presence at schools, which they said could indirectly increase the criminalization of minority students. Most Democrats thought the legislation was weak compared with more sweeping changes they have promised voters; one, Rep. Norma J. Torres (D-Calif.), argued Friday that the bill was the “bare minimum.”

“We should be embarrassed,” she said.
Following previous mass shootings, Murphy and Cornyn tried to strike a deal but fell short. The group of 20 senators knew that meaningful and lasting reforms meant approaching negotiations without poison pills that would immediately push Republicans away from the table.

On Thursday, McConnell acknowledged that the deal “is the sweet spot … making America safer, especially for kids in school,” and later telling reporters that he hopes it will help the GOP earn good will from “voters in the suburbs that we need to regain to hopefully be a majority next year.”
The 15 Republicans who joined all Democratic senators in supporting the bill were Sens. Roy Blunt (Mo.), Richard Burr (N.C.), Shelley Moore Capito (W.Va.), Bill Cassidy (La.), Susan Collins (Maine), Joni Ernst (Iowa), Lindsey O. Graham (S.C.), Lisa Murkowski (Alaska), Rob Portman (Ohio), Mitt Romney (Utah), Thom Tillis (N.C.), Patrick J. Toomey (Pa.) and Todd C. Young (Ind.), as well as McConnell and Cornyn.
 

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It will do nothing to prevent someone bent on murder and passed by idiots on a tyrannical bent.
However they can claim they did something that will do nothing but at least they did something.:mad:
 

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From the Washington Post this morning:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/2022/06/24/house-approves-gun-bill/

The House of Representatives passed significant gun violence legislation on Friday aimed at curbing the frequency of mass shootings in the United States, ending the measure’s quick trip through Congress. It now heads to President Biden for his signature to make it law.

Following Senate action Thursday night, House passage of the Bipartisan Safer Communities Act broke an almost 30-year logjam in Washington on the contentious and emotional issue of gun rights. The metastasizing divisions that have separated Republicans and Democrats on the issue since the passage of the 1994 assault weapons ban have prevented meaningful changes to acquiring and retaining firearms for those who are not law-abiding citizens.
The House took the noteworthy step on the same day that the Supreme Court, across the street from the U.S. Capitol, released its historic decision to overturn abortion rights as established in Roe v. Wade, painting a dramatic tableau in Washington. Democrats clapped, smiled and linked arms after the gun measure passed the House, a striking departure from their earlier grim faces.

The gun legislation was the result of negotiations by a handful of Republican and Democratic senators, led by Sens. Chris Murphy (D-Conn.) and John Cornyn (R-Tex.), in the wake of recent mass shootings in Uvalde, Tex., and Buffalo.
In addition to providing funding for mental health services and school security initiatives, the legislation expands criminal background checks for some gun buyers, bars a larger group of domestic-violence offenders from purchasing firearms and funds programs that would allow authorities to seize guns from troubled individuals.
The bill passed the House overwhelmingly along party lines, 234 to 193, with no Democratic defections. Fourteen Republicans voted in favor, including Rep. Tony Gonzales (R-Tex.), who represents Uvalde, the small city that is now the infamous home of the second-largest mass school shooting after the one in Newtown, Conn., almost a decade before.

Democrats were seen hugging Rep. Lucy McBath (D-Ga.), who ran for Congress after her son, Jordan Davis, was shot and killed following a dispute over loud music at a gas station. They were congratulating her after provisions she supported made it into the bipartisan package.
McBath audibly sobbed on the House floor after Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) handed her a piece of paper with the final vote tally, leading McBath to gently place her head on Pelosi’s shoulder as they embraced.
“With this bipartisan package, we take the first steps to fight back on behalf of the American people, who desperately want new measures to keep communities safe in the high numbers in the polling,” Pelosi said on the House floor. “To those who lacked the courage to join in this work, I say your political survival is insignificant compared to the survival of our children.”

The Senate approved the measure, which was agreed to by 20 bipartisan senators, late Thursday. Fifteen Republican senators joined all Senate Democrats, marking a historic and rarely seen agreement across party lines in an equally divided Senate. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) supported the bill, while the National Rifle Association opposed it.

“Behind the facade and the contrived talking points of safety, school security and mental health, this is a gun control bill,” the NRA said Friday.
The package is being sent to Biden’s desk one month to the day after an 18-year-old killed 19 children and two teachers at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde. The tragic loss of life shook the nation as it was already coping with a mass shooting at a grocery store in Buffalo that left 10 dead.

The twin incidents influenced Rep. Chris Jacobs (R-N.Y.), a father of young daughters who was born and raised in Buffalo, to break with his party and come out in support of banning assault weapons and limiting high-capacity magazines, among other measures. The move appeared to have hurt him politically, prompting him to announce a week later that he would not seek reelection, after he lost significant GOP support.
Other Republicans who are retiring joined Jacobs in passing the measure, including Reps. John Katko (N.Y.), Fred Upton (Mich.), Anthony Gonzalez (Ohio) and Adam Kinzinger (Ill.). Rep. Tom Rice (S.C.), who lost his primary race, backed it. Vulnerable GOP Reps. Brian Fitzpatrick (Pa.), Peter Meijer (Mich.) and Maria Elvira Salazar (Fla.), plus several Republicans in the Ohio delegation — including Reps. Steve Chabot, Michael R. Turner and David Joyce — also voted in support.
And in the most surprising defection from her party, Rep. Liz Cheney, the Wyoming Republican facing a heated primary challenge in August, also backed the measure, meaning she will probably face attacks in her conservative Western state over this issue as well as her prominent role on the committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol. She has been working to win over Democratic voters ahead of her primary.

“As a mother and a constitutional conservative, I’m proud to support this sensible bill that will protect our children and limit violence without infringing on law-abiding citizens’ Second Amendment rights. Nothing in the bill restricts the rights of responsible gun owners. Period,” Cheney said in a statement.
Cheney aims to recruit crossover Democrats in her primary
Her office also noted that the legislation had received the backing of the Fraternal Order of Police and the National Sheriffs’ Association, groups the GOP often turns to before considering how to vote on legislation.
The legislation is modest compared with what Biden had asked of Congress, including banning assault weapons and raising the age to purchase a firearm from 18 to 21. Neither are in the compromise package.

The bill does, however, direct millions to increase mental health services and school security measures, which Republicans have championed as the best ways to address school shootings instead of tougher measures pushed by Democrats. The measure also expands criminal background checks for some gun buyers, and bars a larger group of domestic-violence offenders from being able to purchase firearms as part of language aimed at what is known as the “boyfriend loophole.” It also funds programs that would allow authorities to seize guns from troubled individuals.

The package faced less resistance from both parties in the Senate than in the House, where Republicans said the bill does not go far enough in expanding school safety and shamed Democrats for arguing that more laws would eliminate future school shootings.
“I’ll tell you what saves lives — the decision we got from the Supreme Court today saves lives. This bill takes life away from law-abiding citizens,” Rep. Jim Jordan (R-Ohio) responded to Pelosi, referencing the Supreme Court abortion decision.

A small number of progressives initially had reservations about the legislation, citing concerns over funding police presence at schools, which they said could indirectly increase the criminalization of minority students. Most Democrats thought the legislation was weak compared with more sweeping changes they have promised voters; one, Rep. Norma J. Torres (D-Calif.), argued Friday that the bill was the “bare minimum.”

“We should be embarrassed,” she said.
Following previous mass shootings, Murphy and Cornyn tried to strike a deal but fell short. The group of 20 senators knew that meaningful and lasting reforms meant approaching negotiations without poison pills that would immediately push Republicans away from the table.

On Thursday, McConnell acknowledged that the deal “is the sweet spot … making America safer, especially for kids in school,” and later telling reporters that he hopes it will help the GOP earn good will from “voters in the suburbs that we need to regain to hopefully be a majority next year.”
The 15 Republicans who joined all Democratic senators in supporting the bill were Sens. Roy Blunt (Mo.), Richard Burr (N.C.), Shelley Moore Capito (W.Va.), Bill Cassidy (La.), Susan Collins (Maine), Joni Ernst (Iowa), Lindsey O. Graham (S.C.), Lisa Murkowski (Alaska), Rob Portman (Ohio), Mitt Romney (Utah), Thom Tillis (N.C.), Patrick J. Toomey (Pa.) and Todd C. Young (Ind.), as well as McConnell and Cornyn.
I see you know how to copy and paste. Going forward a small paragraph and a link.
 

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Well, if it helps keeping guns out of the hands of nutcases, I'm all for it.
Do you seriously think anything in the bill will prevent the next situation, other than the new infringements enacted on We The People of the several states.If that were the case I would lead me to believe that you were against the Bruen decision,as that infringement by N Y state was for the same reasoning.
 

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Nothing in that bill would have changed a single mass shooting. Well, it might disarm the person who could have stopped it.
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Do you seriously think anything in the bill will prevent the next situation, other than the new infringements enacted on We The People of the several states.If that were the case I would lead me to believe that you were against the Bruen decision,as that infringement by N Y state was for the same reasoning.
I don't know. If you look at all the mass shootings in the last couple of decades - and by "mass shooting" I mean some guy shooting people randomly in school, or nightsclubs, or churches, randomly - the shooter was always some guy with severe mental issues. Guys like that shouldn't be able to get guns, wouldn't you agree?

In the Uvalde school shooting there were plenty of armed police officers, but instead of going in they waited outside for a full hour, and they even prevented parents with guns from going in. How idiotic is that? Laws in Texas aren't exactly restrictive, and yet here you are.

I don't know whether this law is the answer but these mass shootings in schools sicken me.
 

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I don't know. If you look at all the mass shootings in the last couple of decades - and by "mass shooting" I mean some guy shooting people randomly in school, or nightsclubs, or churches, randomly - the shooter was always some guy with severe mental issues. Guys like that shouldn't be able to get guns, wouldn't you agree?

In the Uvalde school shooting there were plenty of armed police officers, but instead of going in they waited outside for a full hour, and they even prevented parents with guns from going in. How idiotic is that? Laws in Texas aren't exactly restrictive, and yet here you are.

I don't know whether this law is the answer but these mass shootings in schools sicken me.
All "Gun Free Zones" for the most part. Several were stopped in their tracks, literally, but no one wanted to champion that, did they.
Laws are already in place to restrict mentally ill, anti depressants, chemical dependent, family violence history, illegal aliens, and a host of other things. They work to an extent, but only when people are honest.
People aren't honest.
We have these signs on several districts in the area. It paints a clear picture of how poor behavior will be handled.
Purple Font Rectangle Magenta Signage
 

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I don't know. If you look at all the mass shootings in the last couple of decades - and by "mass shooting" I mean some guy shooting people randomly in school, or nightsclubs, or churches, randomly - the shooter was always some guy with severe mental issues. Guys like that shouldn't be able to get guns, wouldn't you agree?

In the Uvalde school shooting there were plenty of armed police officers, but instead of going in they waited outside for a full hour, and they even prevented parents with guns from going in. How idiotic is that? Laws in Texas aren't exactly restrictive, and yet here you are.

I don't know whether this law is the answer but these mass shootings in schools sicken me.
"I don't know whether this law is the answer but these mass shootings in schools sicken me."

As it does all of us,it's the method gone about correcting it. All of the provisions in the bill have gone around from 2019,2020 and 2021 and when introduced by their respective authors went exactly no where.

What was required was the impetuous to lump them together to pass under the pressure of the situations they were without the pressure of the incident they were going no where fast. Now we live with the infringements till who knows when as NYSRPA v Bruen only took more than 100 years, think I'm wrong, wait till the next incident and renewed calls for even more as these provisions will not stop the next one, sadly.
 

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I don't know. If you look at all the mass shootings in the last couple of decades - and by "mass shooting" I mean some guy shooting people randomly in school, or nightsclubs, or churches, randomly - the shooter was always some guy with severe mental issues. Guys like that shouldn't be able to get guns, wouldn't you agree?

In the Uvalde school shooting there were plenty of armed police officers, but instead of going in they waited outside for a full hour, and they even prevented parents with guns from going in. How idiotic is that? Laws in Texas aren't exactly restrictive, and yet here you are.

I don't know whether this law is the answer but these mass shootings in schools sicken me.
The present system has already proven itself to be a failure on numerous occasions where people passed an NICS background check and legally purchased firearms after being deemed unfit to have them, the shooter in Buffalo NY for example, and this political stunt won't improve anything.
This was created, supported, and passed by members of both Parties to give the sheeple the impression that these politicians are "working for the people's safety and security" and to aid them in keeping their places at the tax payer funded feed trough.
As I have said before, if anti firearm individuals and groups were serious about doing something positive in regards to the firearms problem we have in the US then why have they never asked the responsible firearm owners of the US for our ideas, suggestions, and assistance?
"The welfare of the people in particular has always been the alibi of tyrants, and it provides the further advantage of giving the servants of tyranny a good conscience." Albert Camus
Ride Safe. Dr.Tramp....................
 
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