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H2O Fowl Farms host monthly IDPA matches on the second Saturday of each month. Registration starts at 9:00am. Safety brief at 10:00am.

The range is located between Dunn and Benson, North Carolina.

H2O Fowl Farms
3494 Fairground Rd
Dunn, NC 28334
http://h2ofowlfarmsnc.com/


I am planning on attending, it will be my first IDPA, we'll see how it goes. :D
 

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Range Report.

Today I participated in my first shooting match of any kind. :eek:
An IDPA match in Dunn, NC. I used my Glock 30sf. I started with a nine round magazine, and used my ten rounder's for reloading. It had six stages, and one of those was a blind stage, you didn't get to look at it before you shot. I don't know if six stages is the norm, but it was enough for me. I was hurting at stage five and six. I couldn't have gone much further.

Things I learned and observations.
First thing I learned? I had a BLAST!! :D If you haven't shot an IDPA match with your carry weapon, you should try it once, at least. You'll learn where your weakness' are, and then can work on correcting them. It is only your life or your families life you might be protecting if something "bad" occurs.

Second thing: Pack everything the night before. I forgot my camera and extra shirt. The two things I didn't pack. :gaah: So no pictures and I had to wear my sweaty t-shirt on the ride home.

Third: Dry fire practice helps, but range time is good also -- IDPA even better.
I have been dry fire practicing everyday for the last few months, and that helped with drawing my weapon from my Remora holster. Now keeping my eye on the front sight? Easy when dry firing at home, extremely hard when on the range, buzzer goes off, and its time to stop bad guys. I need to practice my trigger reset, I was releasing the trigger too far, and that didn't help with staying on target.
I also need to work on magazine reloads, I was slow. The Remora magazine pouch is too deep for my ten round magazines, I need something different, or I need to put paper/tissue in the bottom of the pouch to bring up the magazine.
I had one failure to feed, but I think that was the old ammo I was using, I hope.

4th: I appreciate my G30sf even more. Conceals fine under my t-shirt and shirt with my Remora holster. I carried it in the heat and humidity from 8:30 to 1:30. Sweat all over it, sweaty hands, sweaty shirts, eyes, pants, you name it, it had sweat on it. Luckily it's a Glock, sweat doesn't hurt it, just uses the sweat as lube. The first stage had a steel popper that had to be engaged to activate another target, my .45 knocked it down easy, some pistols had to ding it more then once. I don't know if they hit it to low, or it didn't have enough "umph", but my first shot knocked it back. The second time a steel popper popped up I missed it four times(maybe five), I was going too fast, didn't take my time. :p

5: A .357 Sig is loud! You know when one of those is firing.

VI: It is hard to watch your front sight and the target. Tunnel vision happens. One stage had a bad guy with a bullet resistant vest, body shots didn't count, had to be a head shot. I didn't notice the body armor, the safety officer told me.

G: The safety officer did a great job, kept me straight, didn't let me shoot my foot.

#8: I need more practice. I need a lot of practice. More dry fire at home, more static range time to practice trigger reset, magazine reloads, I want to shoot some more IDPA. I don't think I'll make it every month, but maybe every other month. Yes .45acp cost more then other ammo, but I'll worry about that later. You need 100-150 rounds to shoot, with the range fee, and rounding up a few bucks, lets say $90.00. So $45 bucks a month to invest in training/fun that will help in keeping me alive. That would give me six times a year to shoot IDPA. We'll see. Moving and shooting is hard. Moving, shooting, staying behind cover and having to reload is even harder, but I'd rather practice at the range then try to figure it out when bad guys are shooting at me.

Thanks for reading my drivel.
 

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That's pretty darn cool Blades!! Glad you had fun and got to learn all in one!! Congratulations!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
That's pretty darn cool Blades!! Glad you had fun and got to learn all in one!! Congratulations!!
Thanks. While there I told my buddy that playing "Call of Duty" and paintball did not prepare me for IDPA.

Very soft bodied holsters, especially IWB style holsters can lead to "bullet Hand."

A very good article on, "Bullet Hand." I see this occuring way too often.
http://www.policeone.com/Officer-Safety/articles/5550393-Don-t-let-your-students-get-bullet-hand/

And as you learned, reloads should come from the weakhand side of the body, making it easier to reach.

I made a post a while back about IDPA gear in general. Learning to Conceal a Firearm & IDPA Gear
located here: http://www.glockforum.com/forum/f31/learning-conceal-firearm-idpa-gear-3991/

IDPA now recommends new shooters take an introduction course usually set up by the club to help new shooters master the sports action of different techniques of shooting in action style sports. Did thy offer one to you?

They did a "newbie" briefing, but not an introduction course.

My Remora holster is a reinforced model, it would not have worked as well if it was the soft case. The soft case would be fine for daily carry, but reholstering after shooting a stage would be difficult. I suppose you would have to remove the holster to place your gun back in it. :confused:


More musings on IDPA(and carrying for defense) if you have a minute to mull over them.

1) Have a reload. If my malfunction occurred on the street and I had no reload, I would have been in trouble.


2) Head shots count-- practice them. One gentlemen in our group must have had special "skull-seeking" bullets, or the gun. He made it look easy. I think his theory was: "Forget the Mozambique, put all three shots in the head", and he did, repeatedly. It was impressive.

3) "Glock pinch". I've read on the internet about people getting pinched by their magazine when loading/reloading/shooting. I didn't have it happen to me this time, but maybe I did something wrong or did something right, no telling.

4) Carrying with a round chambered. I've considering carrying with an empty chamber, for different reasons, but I had issues during the IDPA that has made me drop that idea. By stage 5 and 6 I was having enough trouble racking the slide making it ready for the start. My hands were tired and sweaty, and the double recoil spring was noticeable.

5) Watching my gun? For some reason when I was drawing my gun I kept looking at it, I don't know why, but I took my eye off the "threat". Okay during IDPA(well not okay), bad during an emergency.

Thanks for reading again.
 

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Blades thanks for the great report and all the tips. The hubs and I are looking to start IDPA soon and I really appreciate you sharing your experience.
 

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Thanks. While there I told my buddy that playing "Call of Duty" and paintball did not prepare me for IDPA.




They did a "newbie" briefing, but not an introduction course.

My Remora holster is a reinforced model, it would not have worked as well if it was the soft case. The soft case would be fine for daily carry, but reholstering after shooting a stage would be difficult. I suppose you would have to remove the holster to place your gun back in it. :confused:


More musings on IDPA(and carrying for defense) if you have a minute to mull over them.

1) Have a reload. If my malfunction occurred on the street and I had no reload, I would have been in trouble.


2) Head shots count-- practice them. One gentlemen in our group must have had special "skull-seeking" bullets, or the gun. He made it look easy. I think his theory was: "Forget the Mozambique, put all three shots in the head", and he did, repeatedly. It was impressive.

3) "Glock pinch". I've read on the internet about people getting pinched by their magazine when loading/reloading/shooting. I didn't have it happen to me this time, but maybe I did something wrong or did something right, no telling.

4) Carrying with a round chambered. I've considering carrying with an empty chamber, for different reasons, but I had issues during the IDPA that has made me drop that idea. By stage 5 and 6 I was having enough trouble racking the slide making it ready for the start. My hands were tired and sweaty, and the double recoil spring was noticeable.

5) Watching my gun? For some reason when I was drawing my gun I kept looking at it, I don't know why, but I took my eye off the "threat". Okay during IDPA(well not okay), bad during an emergency.

Thanks for reading again.
I'll take 5 first because it is the most important.
Yoa aren't comfortable yet drawing your pistol from the holster and that is why you look. It takes about 700 times of doing it correctly before you get the hang of it. It starts to become muscle memory after that. There are several step too that have to take place in order to make/effect a safe and quick draw. But first:

PRACTICE makes perfect. Unload your pistol and place all your ammo and magazines (yea, even the empties) in another room.

With the pistol in the holster and no cover garments practice (without looking) JUST reaching down and getting a grip on the frame but don't draw. How:
Rake your ribs with your gun hand thumb and learn where you need to make your hand travel to get a good grip on the frame. Now got that, do it a hundred times without error.

Oh you say, you screwed up at 59..... start all over at one again, two, three.....

You can look in a mirror if you wish to in the begining but you'll know by the feel, when it is right.

All that just to learn how to get a grip before you pull the pistol, why?

Without a solid grip you will not feel comfortable and your confidence will be much lower. Once you believe you can control the gun with one hand you are ready to pull the gun straight up and CLEAR OF THE HOLSTER before you make the turn from that position toward the target.

Much more to it but thhat is the starting point for now.

Learning to holster a loaded weapon is more important than learning to draw from the holster.

Before you get to drawing, make sure that you are good at getting a solid grip each time and change your carry position as you may have to, in order to acheive that goal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Blades thanks for the great report and all the tips. The hubs and I are looking to start IDPA soon and I really appreciate you sharing your experience.
Your welcome. I recommend trying it once, just to get the adrenaline flowing, people watching, and you trying to draw and engage targets -- it made me realize how unprepared I am to defend myself/family with my handgun. :eek:

I'll take 5 first because it is the most important.
Thanks G-23! I'll practice that also. My Remora holster sits low, so it takes a bit more to get my hand on the grip.
 

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Your welcome. I recommend trying it once, just to get the adrenaline flowing, people watching, and you trying to draw and engage targets -- it made me realize how unprepared I am to defend myself/family with my handgun. :eek:



Thanks G-23! I'll practice that also. My Remora holster sits low, so it takes a bit more to get my hand on the grip.
I understand. They may be a good deep concealment holster but for having to draw in a amn on man situation, you can see now that it isn't a good holster for that situation. Same reason we have different blades on screwdrivers.

Might want to look at other holsters that offer more grip area to your hand. Like earlier, it isn't so much the ability to draw but the ability to safely holster that loaded pistol too that is a real concern.

Remember IDPA is a good game for getting you familar with your EDC equipment and as such, you have to have function and reliability.

Holstering and drawing is the basic gun handling skill you need to master before other stuff like reloads and concealment.

Enjoy your new found sport!:)
 

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Great write-up guys! I greatly appreciate it. We do not have IDPA here in central MS, but we do have USPSA and a lot of the same principles apply!
 

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Refreshing!

Range Report.

Today I participated in my first shooting match of any kind. :eek:
An IDPA match in Dunn, NC. I used my Glock 30sf. I started with a nine round magazine, and used my ten rounder's for reloading. It had six stages, and one of those was a blind stage, you didn't get to look at it before you shot. I don't know if six stages is the norm, but it was enough for me. I was hurting at stage five and six. I couldn't have gone much further.

Things I learned and observations.
First thing I learned? I had a BLAST!! :D If you haven't shot an IDPA match with your carry weapon, you should try it once, at least. You'll learn where your weakness' are, and then can work on correcting them. It is only your life or your families life you might be protecting if something "bad" occurs.

Second thing: Pack everything the night before. I forgot my camera and extra shirt. The two things I didn't pack. :gaah: So no pictures and I had to wear my sweaty t-shirt on the ride home.

Third: Dry fire practice helps, but range time is good also -- IDPA even better.
I have been dry fire practicing everyday for the last few months, and that helped with drawing my weapon from my Remora holster. Now keeping my eye on the front sight? Easy when dry firing at home, extremely hard when on the range, buzzer goes off, and its time to stop bad guys. I need to practice my trigger reset, I was releasing the trigger too far, and that didn't help with staying on target.
I also need to work on magazine reloads, I was slow. The Remora magazine pouch is too deep for my ten round magazines, I need something different, or I need to put paper/tissue in the bottom of the pouch to bring up the magazine.
I had one failure to feed, but I think that was the old ammo I was using, I hope.

4th: I appreciate my G30sf even more. Conceals fine under my t-shirt and shirt with my Remora holster. I carried it in the heat and humidity from 8:30 to 1:30. Sweat all over it, sweaty hands, sweaty shirts, eyes, pants, you name it, it had sweat on it. Luckily it's a Glock, sweat doesn't hurt it, just uses the sweat as lube. The first stage had a steel popper that had to be engaged to activate another target, my .45 knocked it down easy, some pistols had to ding it more then once. I don't know if they hit it to low, or it didn't have enough "umph", but my first shot knocked it back. The second time a steel popper popped up I missed it four times(maybe five), I was going too fast, didn't take my time. :p

5: A .357 Sig is loud! You know when one of those is firing.

VI: It is hard to watch your front sight and the target. Tunnel vision happens. One stage had a bad guy with a bullet resistant vest, body shots didn't count, had to be a head shot. I didn't notice the body armor, the safety officer told me.

G: The safety officer did a great job, kept me straight, didn't let me shoot my foot.

#8: I need more practice. I need a lot of practice. More dry fire at home, more static range time to practice trigger reset, magazine reloads, I want to shoot some more IDPA. I don't think I'll make it every month, but maybe every other month. Yes .45acp cost more then other ammo, but I'll worry about that later. You need 100-150 rounds to shoot, with the range fee, and rounding up a few bucks, lets say $90.00. So $45 bucks a month to invest in training/fun that will help in keeping me alive. That would give me six times a year to shoot IDPA. We'll see. Moving and shooting is hard. Moving, shooting, staying behind cover and having to reload is even harder, but I'd rather practice at the range then try to figure it out when bad guys are shooting at me.

Thanks for reading my drivel.
Your accounting is so refreshing...thanks for the honesty and vivid imagery..
 

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My range, where I'm a member, does idpa once a month. Now I have to try it out.
 
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