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Hey guys, amateur pistol owner here, just bought my first Glock 45 a few days ago. When I took it out of the box to work on dry firing for the first time, I made a mistake that I hope didn’t damage anything internal with the gun. Stay with me here if you care.

My first mistake was that I didn’t remove the empty magazine that comes with the pistol. I do not own any ammunition yet, so I felt comfortable with dry firing inside of my home. I racked the slide back, and it stuck in the rear/open position like it is supposed to when the magazine is empty. However, being an amateur, I still attempted to pull the trigger with the position aimed in a safe direction. I was able to pull the trigger to the point that is made a clicking/snapping noise, however, it required more force than under normal circumstances to break the trigger. This is what worries me. Realizing I made a mistake, I immediately removed the magazine and released the slide to the closed position. From there, I performed several trigger reset tests, which were all successful.

My biggest concern is that I pulled the trigger when I shouldn’t have, and that I may have damaged something internally, even though the gun seems to be functioning well. Do you guys think I should reach out to a gunsmith for inspection/repair? I guess I won’t know for sure until I shoot live rounds through it. Any and all feedback is helpful, thank you!
 

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Make sure it is empty, put a pencil in the barrel (eraser to the breech) and fire it, pointing up. If the pencil moves, you are good. I don't recall how a Glock reacts to this. It could just jump or it could jump out of the barrel, so take caution for this.
Sounds like you didn't misplace anything when you did that. I don't recall ever being able to do that with the slide back. How hard were you pressing the trigger? I would still advise having an armeror take a peek and expain your concern to them. It is hard to diagnose over the internet.
Get some training on the thing and don't hurt yourself or you investment.
Welcome to the site.
Cheers
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Make sure it is empty, put a pencil in the barrel (eraser to the breech) and fire it, pointing up. If the pencil moves, you are good. I don't recall how a Glock reacts to this. It could just jump or it could jump out of the barrel, so take caution for this.
Sounds like you didn't misplace anything when you did that. I don't recall ever being able to do that with the slide back. How hard were you pressing the trigger? I would still advise having an armeror take a peek and expain your concern to them. It is hard to diagnose over the internet.
Get some training on the thing and don't hurt yourself or you investment.
Welcome to the site.
Cheers
Thank you, that is helpful. I wouldn’t say that I had to squeeze through an excessive amount of resistance, but it was definitely more difficult to pull than under normal circumstances. It eventually broke and gave a click/snap noise that sounded pretty similar to the sound I get when I dry fire. Having invested a good chunk of change into this, I am just really paranoid and don’t know if I need to wait and have someone look at it before I try to shoot live rounds through it. Thank you for your response.
 

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"It eventually broke and gave a click/snap noise that sounded pretty similar to the sound I get when I dry fire."

The snap and click you heard and hear normally is the connector flexing to allow the cruciform to drop allowing the tail of the striker/F P to move forward.
The final click is the connector returning to position known as reset,I agree with Lost In Texas,I don't think you did any damage and to prove it would do the pencil test.
 

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An afterthought. If you plan to do dry firing, and I'm not that much of a fan of this practice but some are, I would suggest investing in snap caps. They are a fake round with a spring connected to the "primer" to avoid damaging the gun. It is a Glock and could probably endure more than above average abuse, but it is still abuse.
You may look into a laser system for this practice as well. This will give you real time feedback instead of just pulling a trigger and having no idea what is going on and making bad habits that are hard to break. This is pretty good practice thanks to the feedback, and with the current ammo situation is a decent training aid. Practice doesn't make perfect. Perfect practice makes adequate.
I don't know where to find these or what they cost, but they are out there and someone here will probably be of help on this device.
Good Luck
 
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Welcome to the Glock Forum. You probably didn't break it. But, if you did, go here and do some reading.

 

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The semi-good news is if anything did brake it would be the trigger/ trigger assembly. Sounds like you may have got lucky though.

Gesture Font Screenshot Adaptation Slope
 

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An afterthought. If you plan to do dry firing, and I'm not that much of a fan of this practice but some are, I would suggest investing in snap caps.
Glock says it's ok to dry fire. But snap caps are advised if you're going to do it a lot...like LostinTexas says. Good thing is that you don't have to rack back too far to reset the trigger.
 

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Snap caps are good.

I like the Pink Rhino laser training aid better. Get the free LaserHIT app for your phone and can have a nice, quiet, indoor training range in your basement. It's like having unlimited ammo! They sell them at Amazon.
 
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