Loose parts

Discussion in 'Glock Forum' started by RRoss, Jul 18, 2012.

  1. RRoss

    RRoss If it goes boom or bang, I want to play with it! Lifetime Supporting Member

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    So I decided it was time to teach my son and daughter to clean our guns since I'm also training them about gun safety and range rules.
    I layed out a white towel on my coffee table and went through the process of field stripping my wifes XD9. Showed her what to clean then let her re-assemble it (she's 7 btw):)
    Next I took apart my 26 and went through the process of showing my son how to clean it. He asked a few questions about the parts in the slide so I did a complete teardown of that as well.
    Somewhere in the demo, he picked up the safety plunger and started playing with it in his hands. The small spring that operates this plunger went flying, never to be seen again.
    My question is: Does anyone use the magnetic trays used in auto maintenance to keep parts together while cleaning their gun?
     
  2. hoovco

    hoovco New Member

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    Haha. I've done that with a few detent springs ... That magnetic tray is super handy for small parts but unfortunately you lose most small parts while you're trying to install or take them apart. If the part makes it to the tray it's nice. Lol.
     

  3. Hurricane460

    Hurricane460 Glock Doc..

    Magnetic tray is a must on my bench for that such reason.
     
  4. Danzig

    Danzig I do hood rat sh%t! Supporter

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    The problem isn't where to put the small parts. It's watching them fly into a parallel dimension never to be seen again while trying to put them in or take them out.

    BTW AR-15's are the worst! Tiniest €&£+'n clips, detents and pins.
     
  5. ming

    ming Member Supporter

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    Happened to me with a 1911 recoil spring plug. I spent most of two days looking for it, even moving my scrap wood pile out of the basement. Since then the floors and walls have been painted but it's still MIA for about two years now. A "friend" suggested I let another one fly to see where it could have gone. Yeah right. Then I'd be out two plugs. :D
     
  6. antek

    antek New Member

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    never even thought about that. now I need to go buy me a magnetic tray.
     
  7. RRoss

    RRoss If it goes boom or bang, I want to play with it! Lifetime Supporting Member

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  8. GastonGlock

    GastonGlock New Member

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    I lost a small silicone looking plug that sits inside the extractor spring on the H&K USP 45 I detailed stripped about 9 months ago. It must've crossed into an alternate reality, no big deal.
     
  9. bhale187

    bhale187 New Member Supporter

    Yep, I think everyone thats assembled and ar15 has a story about how they lost the front take down pin detent spring :eek:
     
  10. Happysniper1

    Happysniper1 New Member

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    Or the buffer retaining spring....or the safety detent pin....or....or...

    It's kinda like washing machines, I guess, where one sock returns clean, and the other one vanishes off into the nether regions....:D
     
  11. Danzig

    Danzig I do hood rat sh%t! Supporter

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    Last one was the ejection port pin snap ring, before that was the charging handle latch pin before that.....


    Makes you appreciate the AK-47
     
  12. Happysniper1

    Happysniper1 New Member

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    Yeah, until the time you need to scrape all the carbon and crud off of the piston...I hate that part!
     
  13. dwcfastrice

    dwcfastrice Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporting Member

    Here's a bit of irony for you. RRoss, calls me and tells me he's lost this part.... While he's talking to me, i'm cleaning the .22's. Soon after he hangs up, i'm working on cleaning the CMMG .22 upper for my AR.

    I get everything back together.

    This morning, walking by where i normally clean my guns, i step on a piece of "Gravel" in the carpet. TUrns out the "gravel", when I pick it up, is the firing pin spring from the CMMG .22 upper.

    D'OH! Good thing I found it before I ran the vacuum today.

    RRoss jinxed me. ;)

    D
     

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  14. RRoss

    RRoss If it goes boom or bang, I want to play with it! Lifetime Supporting Member

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    Wow, sorry dude! Glad you had better luck than I did
     
  15. G-23

    G-23 Premium Member

    As a locksmith of almost 30 years experience maybe I can shed some light on the subject of the art at "Capturing the Flying Spring."

    While a magnetic tray might help reduce the iron parts from getting loose after you lay them down, most action is created when the parts are being handled. Locks are like autos now a days. There are many different brands and so many different models of lock and old locks we have to deal with.

    1. To disassemble small parts for cleaning most locksmiths will ensure we have a clean work area on the bench and THE FLOOR around us before we start to work. And if you don't create a work space large enough, surely the spring will fly farther than you anticipated! So we most always carry a small magnet for the hunt, just in case!

    2. Parts are studied for where they go and understood as to why/how that part performs it job before disassembly. Then we disect the lock laying the parts out in the order we remove them, first part is the farthest. Springs are always laid with the parts they interact with.

    3. A cleaning pan with high sides most often like a bread loaf baking pan is used for brushing/cleaning agents to remove old hardened grease (soaking).

    4. Once parts are cleaned an inventory is taken of the laid out parts and reassembly starts.

    Disassembling and putting stuff togetheragain is where we mostly encounter the "Flying Spring." They look so innocentjust laying there next to the part they operate and won't usually take offuntil you turn your attention to the next part. While your attention is diverted,a "PING" is heard, and there it goes!
    But no, it doesn't just fly in a straight line (Well for a short distance) for long because it most always finds another object to impact and deflect it's uncharted course. So now the hunt is on. Small springs seem to travel farther because they are harder for us to see! Big springs seem to land right next to the foot you are going to move first, and crush the spring!

    As a salvage diver in the Navy I used to do underwater searches for lost objects usually dropped off a ship or even during training mine recovery (recovery of mines dropped from aircraft). I usually start the search for a spring just as I did back in my Navy days underwater.

    Start by carefully looking in a systematic search pattern on the bench first. If a small spring then search the bench again with the magnet. Remember, DON'T move the feet or the chair for that matter!

    Next carefully remove yourself from the scene (Check your lap too) and do a visual search pattern of the area. Next use the magnet and finally (for me anyway) search outside of the van doors on the ground (if the doors are open).

    Oh, you'll be surprized how much flight training a spring has before you get to work with it the first time!

    Always remember, search and rescue of Flying Springs can be a fun time especially when you run across other stuff in the nooks and crannies that you never knew you had! Enjoy the search!

    :D Carry spares;)
     
  16. RRoss

    RRoss If it goes boom or bang, I want to play with it! Lifetime Supporting Member

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    Thanks for the advice and the chuckle. I'm just looking forward to getting the replacement. Hate not being able to carry it.
     
  17. G-23

    G-23 Premium Member

    Glock Part # SP00091
     
  18. RRoss

    RRoss If it goes boom or bang, I want to play with it! Lifetime Supporting Member

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    Thanks. One of my buddies from this forum is actually bringing me one when we go shooting this weekend.