Looking for good reloading video

Discussion in 'Ammo & Reloading' started by howatu, Feb 22, 2012.

  1. howatu

    howatu New Member

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    Does any one know of any online clips that would be usefull.
     
  2. SHOOTER13

    SHOOTER13 RETIRED MODERATOR Sponsor Lifetime Supporting Member

    Have you done a search on YouTube ?!
     

  3. howatu

    howatu New Member

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    No but I will check that out just want general info looking to start doing some reloading on my own.
     
  4. SHOOTER13

    SHOOTER13 RETIRED MODERATOR Sponsor Lifetime Supporting Member

    [ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oqF8f2-4RdM[/ame]

    [ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kYS_3VsmOP0[/ame]

    [ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=irC3NuIKDm4[/ame]
     
  5. SHOOTER13

    SHOOTER13 RETIRED MODERATOR Sponsor Lifetime Supporting Member

    Lots of good info out there...free library has reloading books too !!
     
  6. Happysniper1

    Happysniper1 New Member

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    Reloading is such a complex set of precise steps (at least, in the calibration stages as well as case prep) that I would hazard a guess and say not to rely on any one source (online video) for learning how to reload.

    NRA offers a metallic cartridge reloading class with NRA-Certified Reloading Instructors. If you are a NRA member (God, I hope you are! :)) then you can call NRA Member Services at 1-877-NRA-2000 (or go to www.NRAmemberservices.org) and ask for a list of Certified Metallic Cartridge Reloading Instructors in your area.

    Reloading is demanding but very boring work. The results could range from a particular load tweaked to match your shooting style and purpose (if done right) or it can blow up you gun (if done wrong) and your garage (well...).

    The equipment is not cheap, but you will only buy it once. I have been reloading for over 11 years now, and I still use my one and only trusty RCBS Rockchucker Supreme single-stage reloading press. I like it, it does what I need for it to do, and I do not see any need to spend a couple hundred bucks on a newfangled multi-station progressive press (unless one happens to fall into my lap on Christmas!:D), I'd rather spend the money on buying components or another gun.

    I do not follow what others would call "traditional" reloading sequence. I prep cases when I have spare time, not when I need them, hence I end up with boxes and boxes of say .40S&W cases all cleaned, polished, decapped, sized and trimmed, with live primers, just waiting for the day I decide to charge them with powder and seat a bullet in them.

    When I need say 500 rounds of 9mm, I set up my station, get my already sized and primed cases, adjust my powder dispenser, then put on a movie and load while watching TV. The precision part I had already done!

    Oh, and when you get into reloading, aside from the hardware you well need to reload you will also need a decent Chronograph, otherwise how do you know your bullet speeds? This also helps identify overpressure and underpressure issues before they blow up your gun and maybe your hand as well.

    I'd be glad to help you out with learning how to reload, just let me know!

    BTW, I am an NRA Certified Metallic Cartridge Reloading Instructor :D
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2012
  7. savage07

    savage07 New Member

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    Wow it's seem like a lot of work. I would have to live on a house with a garage in order to do all of that, uh?
     
  8. Happysniper1

    Happysniper1 New Member

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    @Savage07:

    There are necessary steps that you cannot bypass or shortcut, like case inspection (includes sorting and discarding unusable cases, primer pocket cleaning [IMHO the most boring part of all!], and case measurement and trimming) setting your powder charges (you CANNOT do this step without at least one or two reloading guidebooks), and setting your bulelt seater. These steps demand your total attention 100% of the time. The rest is brainless mechanical work.

    I do reloading classes (I call 'em Reloading Parties) in the back patio in the summer. Show up with $25, while the bbq's are cooking I go thru all the steps from case cleaning to labelling the finished loads. I supply all the materials for common loads (9mm, .40SW, .38SPL and .45ACP). When all the loading is done, each participant goes home with a box of ammo they loaded, and a full stomach!

    Because my stuff needs to be able to go from garage to back yard, it is not bolted down (I use 6" C-clamps). When I load for myself, I set the reloading press and the powder dispenser onto a wooden barstool and load in the living room while watching TV. Sure, for storage you need space, but my setup I can take down and box up (or move from garage to back yard and back). Just a thought...