Light with Green Laser for Glock 19 Suggestions

Discussion in 'Optics / Sights / Lasers / Lights' started by Wolven, Apr 23, 2016.

  1. Wolven

    Wolven New Member

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    My bedside gun is a Glock 19 and I'd like to add a tactical light with a green laser to it.
    I only use this gun at our personal range to keep good with it and keep it by my side of the bed. So no worries regarding holstering.
    However, being a lady, I'd prefer any add-on to be as lightweight as possible and still be very good when I need it.
    What would you recommend?
    Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
    :thankyou:
     
  2. FATUM1965

    FATUM1965 New Member

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  3. MFJIMMY

    MFJIMMY Member

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    That's what I have. Works good.
     
  4. Greywood

    Greywood Low speed High drag Supporter

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    Crimson Trace and Viridian I'm pretty sure have what your looking for. Streamlight may also have something but I'm not 100% sure. I'm a fan of Crimson Trace and as the other poster posted Surefire myself but that's just me.
     
  5. FATUM1965

    FATUM1965 New Member

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    SureFire makes some light/laser combos but they're very expensive at $500+. Also the lights are 500+ lumen which is great outside but indoors it is far too bright for my liking. Turns everything bright white. For a more affordable option yet still high reliability, I would go with crimson trace. Virus Ian was the first to, "master." the green laser according to many but ergonomics and light power are lacking on many of the models they offer. The XC1 I mentioned is just a light but it's the perfect defense attachment for the 19 specifically, in my opinion.
     
  6. FATUM1965

    FATUM1965 New Member

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    Virus lan is supposed to say Viridian*
     
  7. GARRIGA

    GARRIGA Well-Known Member

    Added the Streamlight TLR-2 HL G to my G21 and practice dry firing in my garage at night in total darkness after letting my eyes adjust to the darkness then lighting up and it's not too bright. If anything those high lumens over 700 help blind the assailant. I knew that before ordering.

    Nothing gets lit up so bright it affects my vision. Plus you can point the gun safely to the side to avoid accidentally shooting the wrong person and yet have enough illumination to clearly identify the target. Plus it has a hot spot which make targeting easy by not just painting an obvious spot on the target but making the sights easier to see. Don't need night sights.

    So long as not too close you see the laser but that hot spot makes it that you don't need it or your sites depending on distance. Don't fear high lumens. It's your friend.
     
  8. PattonWasRight

    PattonWasRight Well-Known Member

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    I'm not personally a fan of weapon mounted light ... for me, I think there's plenty of scenarios where I would not want my gun pointed at the source of a noise. With a separate light, I can still investigate, and have my gun at a safe ready position.

    We don't want to let loose a round accidentally when being startled by the hiding neighborhood kid that snuck into our garage ... if that happens with a weapon mounted light, it can be an avoidable tragedy.

    It's different for the tactical guys ... that's where the bad guys know the good guys are coming through doors or windows ... in that case the good guys want a weapon light to find the bad guys quickly.

    I have the Crimson Trace universal rail mount model and am very happy with it. Easy and natural to activate with your trigger finger when in the 'safe' position. Very small and light and has held it's alignment. Also, a laser alone is a nice deterrent to some ... whether true or not sends the message "I'm not going to miss"
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2016

  9. Have you actually tried one? A weapon mounted light, like most lights, has a lot of "light spill". I can walk through my house in pitch dark with the firearm pointed towards the ground (below low ready), and have plenty of light to search an area.

    I also keep handheld lights all over my house, but my AR's and primary handguns all have mounted white lights.
     
  10. PattonWasRight

    PattonWasRight Well-Known Member

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    I hear what you're saying, you can see enough to move around and observe. I actually have one I bought on a whim, nothing fancy.

    While you can keep the gun pointed downward, IMO our natural reaction to finding someone or them jumping out is to then point the light at the person / source of disturbance. I think we can all imagine scenarios where that's not the right action to take.

    For tactical guys that are breeching into a building, they make sense. For a home owner where the most likely outcome is it's not a potential shoot scenario, I'd rather have my light and weapon separate. Also, I'd rather hold my light far away from my body, so as to not give the intruder something to aim at. Held high and away is what I believe LE folks are taught.

    Once you are engaging a known threat, then yes, it's great to have the light point with the weapon, and that's a lot easier if it's mounted to it rather than using that two handed grip (light hand bracing with gun hand) but until that point, for me, I want them separated.
     
  11. GARRIGA

    GARRIGA Well-Known Member


    Here's how I rationalized this. Two hands on a gun results in the least chance of something going wrong unless you need to fend off an assailant, open doors or direct a family member. Having a light might hinder illuminating a threat while taking that action.

    Just like one can train to hold a light and point the gun in a safe direction than they can also train to use the edge of a powerful light to illuminate a potential threat yet keep that nozzle pointed in a safe place. I think I'm the past the weak weapon lights for pistols didn't provide that option. Technology has advanced. Perhaps new strategies should develop with it.
     
  12. GARRIGA

    GARRIGA Well-Known Member

    Another benefit. On my G21 the light extends out enough that if I placed my barrel on someone's chest it wouldn't go off battery.
     
  13. PattonWasRight

    PattonWasRight Well-Known Member

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    Yep, pros and cons as you point out. We all end up making the decision we're comfortable with and have trained for.

    Have to say, that one never occurred to me! Add that to the list.
     
  14. I have Surefires and Streamlights, from 250 to 600 lumens. They can be kinda pricy, but I've bought every one on sale, usually from Primary Arms or LA Police Gear for 25-40% off. And even with my aging eyes and less than optimal 'night vision', I can see a lot more than "enough to move around and observe". The spill on my weapons lights will light up an entire room or hallway, or a large portion of my yard.

    I've been trained to use a handheld flashlight with a pistol at night, both inside and outside a building, with live fire using the "Harries", "FBI" (cheek hold), and "Cigar hold" light techniques and cover tactics. It's not easy as it looks on TV trying to maintain a light in one hand and a firearm in another and make the light go on and off as needed. In fact, it's darn right hard to hold that light well and shoot well. And opening/closing doors, picking things up, etc., as well as weapons manipulation is much more complicated with both hands full.

    I understand your point that you can use the flashlight without pointing it at a target you do not want to destroy, but keep in mind I never said to go without a handheld light. Certainly, you should also have a handheld light on you and use it if you are looking around an area on a random check. Your weapon light should only be used when there is a reasonable assurance you are dealing with a threat.

    When you are in a SD situation in the dark, where you may be encountering a hostile, proper procedures dictate you will (should) always have your firearm and your light pointed in the same direction and area. Your firearm should be pointed in the general direction (even if pointed downward) where your eyes are scanning.

    YMMV...
     
  15. PattonWasRight

    PattonWasRight Well-Known Member

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    An important distinction, I agree.
     
  16. Greywood

    Greywood Low speed High drag Supporter

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    I definitely mount lasers but lights I just don't have any currently. I do have some hand held lights and they work but I also will use my white walls to bounce my light off of. I keep my lights on the low settings so I don't blind myself and kill my night vision.
     
  17. chowser51

    chowser51 Active Member

    Held high and away is what I believe LE folks are taught.

    Maybe a long time ago before the advent of WMLs.

    I know I no longer use or teach it.
    A WML allows me a free hand to open doors and other things.

    Like previously stated, a gun with WML at low ready will light up enough for you to identify your target.

    I'm no longer a believer in holding a light away from my body. I'm already at a disadvantage. The bad guy I'm searching for knows I'm coming. I want instant identification if I'm going to press out and point my gun at someone.

    I know Viridian, Streamlight and Crimson Trace have green lasers with lights.

    I don't use lasers but I've had good luck with Streamlight and Viridian lights.

     
  18. MFJIMMY

    MFJIMMY Member

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    I have a Surefire XC1 on my primary carry Glock 19

    I have a Surefire EB2 in my pocket for a handheld tactical light.

    I have a Surefire Sidekick on my keyring for general lighting tasks.
     
  19. PattonWasRight

    PattonWasRight Well-Known Member

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    You guys have swayed me on this. I'm going to mount my light on my home defense gun and see what you're saying about holding at a safe low ready and using the "spill" light. That's for when I have reason to believe there is an home intruder. Otherwise, I'd use a handheld until that point.
     

  20. My Gunsite class instructors showed us the 'high and away' technique as well. But they all stressed no one technique worked best for any specific, given situation. They also commented that the further apart your hands were from each other, the more difficult it is for your brain to make them function independently. Think about the classic "rub belly, pat head" coordination exercise.

    Unfortunately, I did not have a WML for any of my Gunsite classes. I will definitely have one with me at my next class.