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Is it worth searching for a barrel with reversed rifling for a left handed shooter?

If so, any suggestions?

If not, any suggestions on an after market barrel?

For a glock19 gen 4, carry and range.
 

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I can't imagine twist direction would make a difference. If that was the case, it would have been done long before Glocks came around. For an aftermarket barrel, go with a KKM. Best there is.
 

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I have the body of a god........Budda
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From the short reasearch ive done, earlier Colt 1911s and revolver had left hand twist in their barrels.

Other then that, I have no clue.
My Colt Mk IV and Kimber Pro Carry have LHT.
 

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Even rifles built for left handed shooters (stag arms for example) still use the same barrels as the right handed models.
 

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Firing/striker pin action is the same, regardless of if a finger from a left hand or a right hand pulls the trigger. OP is overthinking things and can save their money for something else.
 

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Barrel twist direction is simply a convention. For everyday shooting (anything shorter than several miles, and with loads weighing less than a pound or so), it simply makes no difference with regards to the ballistics (physics). I know there are those who will spout out about the coriolis effect but, trust me, it doesn't matter unless you are lobbing tank rounds at enemy positions several miles downrange.

So, why do most guns have a right hand twist?

Turns out it has to do with the equipment used to make the rifling in the barrels. Most American lathes are set up to turn rifling with a right hand twist. Apparently, the story is the other way around in the UK (... but even the Brits don't use British guns ;-)). Interestingly, the Brits USED to think (like the OP I suppose) that right handed shooters usually pull their shots to the right a bit, and that a left hand twist to the rifling will minimize the effect. Not so, but it was a quaint idea.

So, by convention, most modern gun barrels have right hand twist.
 

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I want to think that we can all agree that the less a pistol moves during the firing cycle the quicker it is to get back on target. The heavier the bullet, and the heavier the powder charge, the MORE the gun moves under recoil. This is the entire rationale for muzzle weights and ported barrels as they reduce muzzle rise. But recoil forces do more than cause muzzle rise; they also create torsional or twisting forces.

Back in the day when bullseye shooting with 1911's was more popular than it is now, for right-handed shooters the conventional wisdom was that pistols with left-hand twist barrels moved or rotated less than their right-hand twist counter parts. A group of us in the early 1970's put this to the test in some quasi-scientific experimentation.

And... we discovered that there is some truth in this. From the vantage point of our eyes, a bullet heading down range from a L/H twist barrel rotates counter-clockwise. Newtonian physics dictate an equal and opposite reaction for the pistol, so it attempts to rotate our hand and forearm clockwise.

Hold your right hand straight out as though you were holding a pistol and position your thumb so that it is pointing straight up. Now, attempt to rotate your wrist as far counter clockwise as possible. For most people this will be somewhere close to 180 degrees. This mimics how the wrist will attempt to react when shooting heavy loads in pistols with a R/H twist.

Repeat the above experiment except this time attempt to rotate your wrist clockwise. For most people this is probably closer to 45 degrees. So... the natural rotational limits of the arm act as a recoil stop of sorts and a pistol with a L/H twist will not rotate as much for a right hand shooter as a pistol with a R/H twist.

Again, the greater the recoil the more pronounced this effect will be. In experimenting with shooting 1911's rapid fire and stopwatch timing using both left and right hand twists it was always marginally quicker for R/H shooters to get back on target using pistols with left hand twist barrels (the converse is true for lefty shooters). All of this is 100% applicable to any pistol, (Glocks included) not just 1911's.

Beefier shooters typically showed less difference than lightweights, but the effect was always there because of the built in rotational limits of our arms. All this is only useful in terms of getting back on target for follow-up shots as quickly as possible. From a practical standpoint it's not enough to obsess over, especially if time is not of the essence.

Just some food for thought...

-Bob
 

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Um... no!

The lateral forces exerted when accelerating a bullet around the center of rotation (center of the barrel in cross section) from zero feet/sec (angular velocity) to maximum angular velocity as the bullet exits the muzzle, are hundreds of orders of magnitude lower than the forces exerted longitudinally because of acceleration from zero to the terminal muzzle velocity (1100 or so ft/sec) of the bullet in direction of fire.

Remember that we are talking about rather slow rotation (compared to muzzle velocity), of a very small mass, that is rotating about a very small radius (half the width the barrel bore). Not only is there relatively little force due to angular momentum, but the torque vector imparted due to the acceleration around the center of rotation is exceedingly small as well. It is unlikely that a typical human will notice it compared to all the other forces acting on the shooter at the moment of firing.

Again, these forces make MUCH more of a difference when you are talking about a shell that is much larger than a 9 or 10mm bullet. If you are talking about a volkswagen sized cannon shell then, yes the lateral torque engendered in firing it at supersonic speeds matters... for my G19 or even my long barrelled G34... not so much!

And, yes, I have a physics background. I worked for 12 years as a nuclear engineer (I'm now a medical doctor... yes I get it, I'm a bit of an overachiever). I didn't want to include the actual diff equations for fear of forcing anyone into a coma or seizure.
 
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