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Is aikido like jiu jitsu? Nobody teaches krav in my area :(



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Krav Maga ( קְרַב מַגָּע "contact combat") is a military self-defense and fighting system developed for the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) and Israeli security forces derived from a combination of techniques sourced from boxing, wrestling, aikido, judo and karate, along with realistic fight training.
 

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Krav Maga ( קְרַב מַגָּע "contact combat") is a military self-defense and fighting system developed for the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) and Israeli security forces derived from a combination of techniques sourced from boxing, wrestling, aikido, judo and karate, along with realistic fight training.
In my personal experience Krav Maga takes the best of the listed martial arts, cuts the BS out. My boys are being trained in Krav Maga, & Brazilian Jiujitsu. I really believe they are the two fighting styles that transfer to real life the most effectively, imho.
 

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Is aikido like jiu jitsu? Nobody teaches krav in my area :(
For those Aikidoka who are reading this, I am using general terms here. For example, school instead of dojo and Morihei instead of O’Sensei.

Aikido has its roots in Daito-Ryu Jujutsu. However, Aikido is not like jiu jitsu.

Daito-Ryu was very difficult to learn because the students would get hurt often and have to take time off to heal and miss training.

The first jujutsu student who thought of a way to train in a safer way was Kano Jigoro and his version is called Judo (The gentle way).

Another student came up with a similar idea to replace the brutal breaks from Daito-Ryu with throwing the body to the ground. His name was Morihei Ueshiba and he created Aikido. Although it took some time for Aikido to evolve into the Aikido that we see today.

You have to be careful in picking an Aikido school.

Several of the Aikido black belts are not whom they claim to be. I have met several who gave themselves promotions to claim a rank that they never achieved.

Also, not all Aikido schools are the same.

There are Aikido schools that want to continue the “art” of what Morihei Ueshiba was able to do. Their schools are more like historical actors and not much different than civil war reenactors. In those schools you will see beautiful movements because both participants are acting their part. Unfortunately, those schools are not interested in being street effective because they just want to preserve the look of what Morihei was able to do.

Then there are some Aikido schools that were started by Americans who trained in Japan. Not only was there a language barrier but there existed another barrier that was missed for years. When the Americans trained and observed Aikido they noticed that no one taught kicks or punches. They assumed that meant that Aikido does not use kicks or punches. This is how the misunderstanding happened. Morihei would select students who were already highly trained martial artists. They already knew how to kick and punch. So Morihei had no reason to teach those skills to them. He wanted to teach them something new. Unfortunately, those American students had no previous training or experience. Those American students returned to the states in the early 1960’s and opened schools in the US and they taught Aikido as a martial art without punches or kicks.

I can certainly vouch for any Suenaka Aikido school. They are based out of Charleston, South Carolina with schools in the US as well as China, Russia, and the Philippines.
www.suenaka.com

You can also find a friend or two and learn Gracie BJJ by watching online videos. GRACIE UNIVERSITY: Global Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ) Instruction – Straight From The Source.

I hope that this helps and that I did not confuse you more.
 

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For those Aikidoka who are reading this, I am using general terms here. For example, school instead of dojo and Morihei instead of O’Sensei.

Aikido has its roots in Daito-Ryu Jujutsu. However, Aikido is not like jui jujitsu.

Daito-Ryu was very difficult to learn because the students would get hurt often and have to take time off to heal and miss training.

The first Daito-Ryu student who thought of a way to train in a safer way was Kano Jigoro and his version is called Judo (The gentle way).

Another student came up with a similar idea to replace the brutal breaks from Daito-Ryu with throwing the body to the ground. His name was Morihei Ueshiba and he created Aikido. Although it took some time for Aikido to evolve into the Aikido that we see today.

You have to be careful in picking an Aikido school.

Several of the Aikido black belts are not whom they claim to be. I have met several who gave themselves promotions to claim a rank that they never achieved.

Also, not all Aikido schools are the same.

There are Aikido schools that want to continue the “art” of what Morihei Ueshiba was able to do. Their schools are more like historical actors and not much different than civil war reenactors. In those schools you will see beautiful movements because both participants are acting their part. Unfortunately, those schools are not interested in being street effective because they just want to preserve the look of what Morihei was able to do.

Then there are some Aikido schools that were started by Americans who trained in Japan. Not only was there a language barrier but there existed another barrier that was missed for years. When the Americans trained and observed Aikido they noticed that no one taught kicks or punches. They assumed that meant that Aikido does not use kicks or punches. This is how the misunderstanding happened. Morihei would select students who were already highly trained martial artists. They already knew how to kick and punch. So Morihei had no reason to teach those skills to them. He wanted to teach them something new. Unfortunately, those American students had no previous training or experience. Those American students returned to the states in the early 1960’s and opened schools in the US and they taught Aikido as a martial art without punches or kicks.

I can certainly vouch for any Suenaka Aikido school. They are based out of Charleston, South Carolina with schools in the US as well as China, Russia, and the Philippines.
www.suenaka.com

You can also find a friend or two and learn Gracie BJJ by watching online videos. GRACIE UNIVERSITY: Global Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ) Instruction – Straight From The Source.

I hope that this helps and that I did not confuse you more.
So what about Steven Seagal?
 

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So what about Steven Seagal?
I found it hard to follow his lineage and separate fact from fiction.

When I was in Miami, I visited his school for a couple weeks. His students were sincere and also did BJJ. Absolute great people and they were very effective.

The teacher there had a solid background in Aikido before affiliating with Seagal. So, I don’t know how much was from his prior training and how much was from Seagal. If that makes sense?

Unfortunately, that school felt abandoned by Seagal because once the movies started they never saw him again.

Sadly, that school has since closed.
 
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