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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm wondering wish of the option is better for your pocket, reloading your own ammo or buying factory ammo? I'm referring to 308 Win ammo.
 

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Once you buy everything to produce a finished round...yes !

Reloading .308 will save you money...
 

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@Savage07:

Getting into reloading is like casually getting into shooting...you buy a gun, then as time passes, you buy and buy and buy ammo for it. The initial capital outlay for reloading will be the most expensive, along the lines of $300-400 (or up to $1,000+) depending on what you buy and where you buy it. After that, all you end up buying are components, except for brass, which you could reload 4-5 times depending on how you loaded it previously (i.e., load a round to max pressure and velocity and you can resuse it less, load it to medium pressure and velocity and you can reload it more often). Of course, you can buy "new" (factory-made, never used) brass, but this is the most expensive component of a round, so you kinda negate any savings when you buy brass.

Reloading gives you two bonuses: (1)you save money versus buying factory new ammo, (2)you can tailor your recipe (meaning the combination of bullet brand, weight, and shape) to the particular powder you prefer, and produce an accuracy round that compliments your particular weapon and shooting style.

The realized savings in reloading comes only when you have or regularly load in excess of 250 rounds all the time. Most bulk bullet packs are in 100 round packages, but you can get them in 250, 500 and 1000 round packages. That is when you save.

One of the biggest kicks once you are an accomplished reloader, is to go to the range with friends. Bring yourself 2-3,000 rounds of ammo. Long after they have burned thru their financial allocation of ammo, you are still shooting, and they are casting envious glances your way :D

Another fun thing to do is to use glowammo patches (see http://www.glowammo.com/) to make your own nonflammable tracer ammunition. It's a real kick!:)

All that being said, I know of a guy, real good family friend, envied my ability to burn ammo like there was no tomorrow, and decided to get into reloading in a big way. Went and bought a Dillon progressive press, dies, Lyman case trim kit, RCBS case prep center, FA tumbler, RCBS Ammomaster chrony, the works! Spent like $2,000 on top of the line gear, fresh brass, primers, powder and bullets in several calibers, all in one shopping cart (I admit it, I was envious!). Reloaded maybe 2 or 3 times, and went back to buying factory ammo because it turned out he had too little time for it. I am waiting patiently on the side, as his wife complains about the cost of unused equipment, to buy his stuff when he decides to get rid of it!

One thing you will need to remind yourself not to do: sell your reloaded ammo. The liability for this -in real terms- can be as simple as replacing a blown-up gun, to medical bills, and a tarnished reputation. It's not worth it. Reload for yourself and for your friends to shoot, but do not sell reloaded ammo to strangers. You do not know what they are going to do with their gun, and they will always blame your ammo.

Aside from the obvious downside to reloading (the initial cost of components), you will learn to love and hate the term "brassing"! It will mean time and dirty fingers and sore knees. You won't find that term in Wikipedia or the Urban Dictionary. Ask a reloader :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Men! I just passed by Bass Pro Shops. And one of the coworker was doing a demo of everything you need and how to reload ammo. That's was cool and everything I need they sell it over there at a nice price! Is not that complicate as I though! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yeah! I bought a book named Lyman reloading book, everything is in there. Now I got some homework to to! Jeje!!
 

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I would also suggest Richard Lee's "Modern Reloading, Second Edition"....it is a very informative book (once you learn to ignore his "Lee-is-better" propaganda). He has VERY extensive loading tables with a very wide variety of powders and bullets.
 

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I was gonna type a big reply but then I read the others. I second what they said. lol

I love reloading and it is the only way I can afford to shoot alot. Especially with 357 sig and 10mm, etc.
 

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I just entered the wonderful world of reloading. I am really enjoying experimenting to create some good recipes for my .38 Special and .357 Magnum revolvers. When I say "experimenting" I do not mean deviating from the load data. I am using different powders and bullets to see what works best with the three revolvers I own in those calibers. Since I just started last month I have not yet invested the money to buy dies for other calibers.
My initial investment was rather hefty. I went with the Lee Classic Turret Press Kit from Kempf Gun Shop. It came with my choice of dies, a powder measure, auto prime system and some other accessories. I proceeded to buy a tumbler, media, media separator and brass polish, a digital scale, a kenetic bullet puller, three reloading manuals, calipers, etc., etc. In all I spent what what I would have on a new 1911 and that did not include the cost of components.
Having said that, I am really enjoying my new hobby. From a cost perspective, I know I will recoup my investment with the savings on factory ammo but the benefits to me are being able to produce what I want when I want it without having to shop around and to be able to produce more accurate loads than I can find in the factory stuff. When I decide to load for a new caliber the only additional costs will be new dies and possibly different components.
 

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@Brutusvk:
Especially with 357 sig and 10mm
Where you located at? I have a bunch of .357Sig and 10mm range brass that I do not reload, just got picked up when I was policing the area. I'd be happy to send it off to you if the postage isn't too prohibitive, or if you want to assume the postage. I think the max limit for the USPS flat rate large box is 70 lbs, but just check it and PM me if you want it. Totally not prepped, not decapped or anything, just tumbled once to get the dirt (earth) out of the insides.
 

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@Brutusvk:


Where you located at? I have a bunch of .357Sig and 10mm range brass that I do not reload, just got picked up when I was policing the area. I'd be happy to send it off to you if the postage isn't too prohibitive, or if you want to assume the postage. I think the max limit for the USPS flat rate large box is 70 lbs, but just check it and PM me if you want it. Totally not prepped, not decapped or anything, just tumbled once to get the dirt (earth) out of the insides.

I will send you a PM.
 

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I'm wondering wish of the option is better for your pocket, reloading your own ammo or buying factory ammo? I'm referring to 308 Win ammo.
It's not all that hard to sort it out. I put together a quick spreadsheet to figure out cost per round for the consumables.

My brother reloads .500S&W; he saves about $20/box.

With 9mm FMJ plinking ammo, it's a wash. Ideally, I save about $1/box reloading, but I also spend quite a bit of time assembling cartridges when I do it.
 

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That glow ammo looks awesome... I may get into reloading just for that hahahah
 

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I have reloaded 9MM, .40 S&W and .45 ACP. I recently stopped doing 9MM because it's really not worth the trouble, saving me $1 to $2 per 50 rounds. I'm doing too much work to save that dollar or two. 40 S&W has saved me a good bit of money because i recently was able to obtain 2000 cleaned/polished cases for $50 which was a straight out steal. That's over $200 worth of brass anywhere you can buy it. I was lucky. Basically i'm saving over $8 per 50 rounds of 40 S&W. I think 45 ACP is the best savings. I buy bulk, copper plated ammo which in my opinion is just as good at punching paper and certainly good enough for Sh_t hits the fan ammo, so I'm able to reload 50 rounds for about $7. This is the same ammo you can get at walmart for $22 a box, basically, saving about $15 per box. Mine may be better than the standard Federal or Winchester White Box. I know it's better than wolf or tula. I have no problem with copper plated bullets. I'm not reloading match quality ammo nor do I intend to do so at any point. I want to start doing .308 at some point. I see a lot of savings in them being that they are $20 a box of 20 for cheapos. I can reload them for about $5 per box of 20.
 
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