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Glockn Rollin
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Let me preface this by saying if I get into reloading right now, it will be a small part of my time and something I will do for fun. I do not need, want, nor can I afford super high quality equipment. I want something that I can use in a small space and that will economical. I simply need something that will get the job done. I don't need to turn out thousands of rounds at a time.

That being said, I found this simple little Lee reloading kit: http://compare.ebay.com/like/230769981737?var=lv&ltyp=AllFixedPriceItemTypes&var=sbar

Would it even be worth my time to purchase this? If not, do you have a better recommendation for a complete kit?
 

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I guess we must be thinking alike today, I've had this on my mind as well.
I want to reload .40S&W along with 9mm, the answer from a buddy of mine was to look more into the turret press so keep that in mind as well.
 

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Well I would still go wit the turret because you could set 1 side up for 40 and the other up for 357 after thry are set up and locked down just turn turret without having to reset everything. That's just my opinion.
My buddy loves his Lee press setup, only thing he got extra was digital scales.
 

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Glockn Rollin
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well I would still go wit the turret because you could set 1 side up for 40 and the other up for 357 after thry are set up and locked down just turn turret without having to reset everything. That's just my opinion.
My buddy loves his Lee press setup, only thing he got extra was digital scales.
How much would the turret press cost? And could I get a complete kit with it?
 

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Off the top of my head I can't remember the cost, look at Lee's web site I think its there.
If I remember correct the turret kit is 150.00 range, give or take, not real sure without looking.
 

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Glockn Rollin
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Off the top of my head I can't remember the cost, look at Lee's web site I think its there.
If I remember correct the turret kit is 150.00 range, give or take, not real sure without looking.
Oh wow, that isn't a bad deal at all. It sounds like what I'm looking for. I will definitely have to look into that.
 

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I recommend going to the "Natchez " web site and Order the "lee classic turret" reloading kit. That's how I started and even though I am into progressives now, I still love the Lee turret and use it all the time. Especially for my big rounds like 500 s&w, 450 Bushmaster and 308.
 

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Load Bearing Wall
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If there's no real urgency as to when you start reloading, you might just look for a single press setup that's used. I still have RCBS equipment from the 70's, and I doubt it will ever wear out. Sometimes reloaders feel the urge to upgrade if they start shooting a lot, & sell off their old press, which is still perfectly functional. So you might ask around at LGS, or outlets that sell used stuff, If you have time to shop it a bit, you might happen across a good deal.
 

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jimmyalbrecht said:
I found the complete kit for $200, so that's not too bad, but I think I might still go with the single stage because of price haha.
Can't blame you there!! I may have been thinking of the cost of the press only, I don't know, it comes with age I guess.
 

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Glockn Rollin
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
If there's no real urgency as to when you start reloading, you might just look for a single press setup that's used. I still have RCBS equipment from the 70's, and I doubt it will ever wear out. Sometimes reloaders feel the urge to upgrade if they start shooting a lot, & sell off their old press, which is still perfectly functional. So you might ask around at LGS, or outlets that sell used stuff, If you have time to shop it a bit, you might happen across a good deal.
There's no huge rush. And I'm real interested in getting a kit that includes everything I will need. I would prefer not to have to piece mill a setup together.
 

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The "no rush" deal is why I suggested getting a Lee Anniversary Kit to start out with. For $100 bucks all you need to do is spend another $30 on a set of dies and you're in business. Then, as you use the stuff in the Kit you can figure out where or even if you need to upgrade to better equipment or not.
Spending a peaceful afternoon loading up a couple hundred rounds of ammo is a great way to collect your thoughts and get yourself centered again. That's why I love my single stage, no rush, just take my time and enjoy the process. ;)
 

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Jimmy:

I just took a closer look at that Lee 50th Anniv kit, and it looks to me (and this is only my opinion) that it could be a solid and reliable kit to start with, and at that price, it is a not-too-painful entry into the world of handloading. If this is what fits your budget, I would suggest to go ahead and take the plunge.

One of the biggest selling points of Lee equipment has always been price. I have personally had no experience with Lee reloaders, so I cannot comment on things like efficiency or durability, but I looked at the "O" frame loader on display at a sports outfitter near me and it seems solid enough. Not as heavy as, say, the RCBS "O" frame, but then again, you won't be bashing zombies on the head with it!

In addition to what is in the kit, you'd need to also buy the following items:

1. An electronic digital caliper to measure case lengths accurately with.

2. Dies in the calibers you plan to load. I would highly recommend the Carbide (Tungsten-Carbide) sizer dies, or the die set with a Carbide die....this eliminates the need to lube the cases prior to sizing, lube that you will need to wash the residue off afterwards. And a set of breech-lock bushings to mate the dies to the reloader. And don't forget the shell holder for the caliber you are loading.

3. As a recommendation: a digital scale that reads in grains, for calibrating the powder dispenser; use instead of the balance-beam scale.

You will also need some way to cleaning the brass, and the most common is to use a vibratory tumbler and tumbling media. These are not expensive. I use ultrasonics to clean the cases, as well as a tumbler to polish them.

Looks like a good kit to start off with. A year into the hobby, you may want to transition to something less tedious (i.e., a progressive), or you may not, but in either case you will be making your own ammo already and will soon forget what it was like to despair when ammo is scarce on the store shelves!

Keep us informed if you will!

CheerS!
 

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Glockn Rollin
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Jimmy:

I just took a closer look at that Lee 50th Anniv kit, and it looks to me (and this is only my opinion) that it could be a solid and reliable kit to start with, and at that price, it is a not-too-painful entry into the world of handloading. If this is what fits your budget, I would suggest to go ahead and take the plunge.

One of the biggest selling points of Lee equipment has always been price. I have personally had no experience with Lee reloaders, so I cannot comment on things like efficiency or durability, but I looked at the "O" frame loader on display at a sports outfitter near me and it seems solid enough. Not as heavy as, say, the RCBS "O" frame, but then again, you won't be bashing zombies on the head with it!

In addition to what is in the kit, you'd need to also buy the following items:

1. An electronic digital caliper to measure case lengths accurately with.

2. Dies in the calibers you plan to load. I would highly recommend the Carbide (Tungsten-Carbide) sizer dies, or the die set with a Carbide die....this eliminates the need to lube the cases prior to sizing, lube that you will need to wash the residue off afterwards. And a set of breech-lock bushings to mate the dies to the reloader. And don't forget the shell holder for the caliber you are loading.

3. As a recommendation: a digital scale that reads in grains, for calibrating the powder dispenser; use instead of the balance-beam scale.

You will also need some way to cleaning the brass, and the most common is to use a vibratory tumbler and tumbling media. These are not expensive. I use ultrasonics to clean the cases, as well as a tumbler to polish them.

Looks like a good kit to start off with. A year into the hobby, you may want to transition to something less tedious (i.e., a progressive), or you may not, but in either case you will be making your own ammo already and will soon forget what it was like to despair when ammo is scarce on the store shelves!

Keep us informed if you will!

CheerS!
Thanks man, well I'm putting this purchase on hold to get a new shotgun hopefully by the end of the month, and this will be pushed back a few months. But I do plan on getting an ultrasonic cleaner for my Glock anyways so I could use it for cleaning the brass in the future. Thanks for all of the info guys!
 

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Glockn Rollin
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Yer welcome!

Ooooh! Shotguns! Then, you can reload shotgun ammo, too! (takes a different reloading rig in most cases).

What shotgun is it you're lusting over, ehem, planning on buying?
It is the Mossberg 500, but the one that is tricked out with sights, adjustable stock and shell holder. Only $350 at a gun shop near my house. That's cheaper than I can get it online!
 
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