Ham Radio!

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by SargeRN, Mar 20, 2020.

  1. SargeRN

    SargeRN Old Soldier Supporter

    How many Ham Radio operators do we have here?? There is just something about Ham Radios and Guns that just seem to go together!
    Well, lets get this rolling! My call is NM5GB and I'm an Extra Class. ARRL District Emergency Coordinator, President of the Pecos Valley Amateur Radio Club -keep getting either suckered or drafted - for the last 4 years. Our club has been instrumental in getting our County EOC equipped with a IC-7300 HF with a full size G5RV at 60 feet and a IC-5100 2m/440m/D-Star and ground plane at about 55 feet. We're really proud of that accomplishment!
    Lets QSO!
    73's to all the hams
    Sarge
     
  2. Slowalker

    Slowalker Member

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    Just received my call sign this morning KE8OFV, now looking into getting a radio and studying for my General License upgrade.
     
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  3. SargeRN

    SargeRN Old Soldier Supporter

    Welcome to a hobby that can be as "interesting" as Black Rifles and Pistols :D
     
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  4. TheKraken

    TheKraken Surviving Covid-19 Staff Member Moderator Lifetime Supporting Member

    How does one go about getting into the Ham Radio hobby?
    It sounds really interesting.
     
  5. Slowalker

    Slowalker Member

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    Sarge, do you have any recommendations for a a radio to start with? A friend has suggested the Alinco DJ-500 dual band.

    Slowalker
     
  6. Robert Kittine

    Robert Kittine Active Member

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    WA2YDV Here, have been a Ham since I was 10 years old. Over 60 years.

    73 - Bob
     
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  7. Robert Kittine

    Robert Kittine Active Member

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    Slowalker, What radio depends on what you want to do. Low Bands? Repeaters? Everything? A dual bander will put you on 2m and 440 FM only. If that is all you are interested in, that is fine. A used IC-706MKII G will put you on 160-6 Meters, All Modes and 2m and 440 as well. And allow you to also work 6meter and 10 meter repeaters in addition to 2m and 440. Add an Alinco DR-235 and you can add 220 to the mix. A lot depends also on your budget. Plenty of used radios out there to start out with and decide where you will go from there. The IC-706 is small enough to go in a car and there are mobile antennas and duplexers made for doing just that. I might even part with one of mine as I have multiple muti-band, multiband radios. If only repeaters and mobile, the Yaesu FT-8900R will put you on 6/10/2/440 FM.

    Bob
     
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  8. Slowalker

    Slowalker Member

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    Thanks Bob for the information. Like handguns, I see there are so many out there with different capabilities. I see a long search with many hour of research to pick the one that will work in my learning about ham radio adventure. I am glad to have the input of knowledgeable friends.
     
  9. Fab

    Fab Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'd swear I had replied but maybe I just thought of it... IW0GYT here.
    I love radio since I was a kid more than 40 years.

    :)
     
  10. Fab

    Fab Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Here you can find the US rules to apply for a license, not so much different from what we got here.

    http://www.arrl.org/getting-licensed
     
  11. SargeRN

    SargeRN Old Soldier Supporter

    Recommendations on radios is about like recommendations on weapons! What works for one doesn't mean it will work for others! Any radio by one of the big 3, in no particular order, ICOM, YAESU and KENWOOD are good. I have either owned or currently own radios by all 3. Secondly it depends on what you want to do. Yak on the local repeater, work long distance to other countries via digital modes, talk to other countries via voice communications, I mean I can go on and on and on, as I know every ham can do as to what part of this hobby do you like.
    And again ham radio is a lot like shooting, you don't like one type you can move on and try something else i.e. some don't like shooting handguns so they shoot rifles or shotguns, just so many different things you can try/do!
    BUT the very first thing, like Fab said, is to get licensed, get tied in with a club that, hopefully, has a bunch of good guys that will help you get going answer questions heck even loan you equipment to get started.
    As you can tell I could talk about this forever as to what ham radio can do, has done and will do!
    Sarge
     
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  12. Robert Kittine

    Robert Kittine Active Member

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    HAM radio has changed greatly since when I got my Novice ticket in 1958. In those days we had a party phone line, a black and white TV and an AM Radio. That was about it with regard to technology. You also had to learn Morse Code which I have never regretted. We were allowed a Crystal controlled transmitter with a maximum INPUT power of 75 watts and only allowed 3 bands on the HF Spectrum, but could do phone (AM Mostly) at 144 megs and above. It was pretty exciting for a 10 year old to talk to someone in White Russia, even though they were only allowed to give the most basic of information.
    Today with cell phones, computers, the internet etc. HAM radio does not excite as many young people as it once did, but the No Code licensing has helped keep the hobby alive and most people have come to realize how much HAM radio can play in there health and safety after emergencies like 9/11 where HAMs were able to communicate better that the mishmash of different types are equipment, frequencies and protocols used by all the other agencies involved.
    During Vietnam, I ran Phone Patches on MARs net allowing kids fighting in Southeast Asia to talk with their loved ones.
    Sarge is right, there are some similarities between buying firearms and radios. Decide how you at least want to start in the hobby and go from there. Joining a local club is a good way to meet others, sharing knowledge and get to try their radios hands on. I also agree that radios by any of the three big and long lasting names makes sense. As inexpensive as they are I am not a fan of the Chinese clones, have tried a few, burned out a few and thrown away a few.

    Bob
     
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  13. Fab

    Fab Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Bob I completely agree with you.
    A lot changed, the entire way to communicate has changed and when you try to explain to a kid what ham radio is they look at you as they just can not understand.
    When you got a smartphone in your hand radio is just anachronistic to a middle looking eye, but as you say when the internet stops working or your local cell repeater is too busy the only thing that continue to work is the radio.

    I admit that in these last years while I still love the radio I found that the average QSO are very boring, people repeating the same topics again and forever.
    Besides all the DMR and digital stuff entered in the ham radio topics took me away from the hobby.

    Right now I only got a FT-817 and a VX6, but in the past I think I had all the HF rigs around.

    Anyway my heart will be always with the radio.
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2020
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  14. SargeRN

    SargeRN Old Soldier Supporter

    My example will be, a few years ago about 80 miles west of us we had a major forest fire (Little Bear Fire). It was in a National Forest and in the mountains. One of the first things that occurred was on top of some of those mountains were the repeaters for some LE and Ham radio. BUT also the relays for EVERY cell service within 200 miles! Guess what happens when you combine fire and electronics? FIRE WINS!! All cell service went down within 2 hours of the fire starting. Our local ARES group deployed to the Hospital, Police Department, Evacuation Shelters etc., etc. We were there for 3 days providing communications until cell service and landlines were restored.
    So YES, as we hams know, radio is still reliable when everything else goes to....
    Sarge
     
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  15. Robert Kittine

    Robert Kittine Active Member

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    I still enjoy CW and work Marine and Aeronautical Mobil. I have a tri band antenna on my bike too. Yes, talking to the same guys over and over again on the local repeaters can be boring, though many friendships are cemented that way. I have worked the Space Shuttle, The Queen Elizabeth and both Barry Goldwater and King Husein. Have boxes full of QSL cards, but I just am not as active as I once was.

    Although I am a member of our local OEM, now that the township has gone digital, they no longer want our help AT ALL.

    Bob
     
  16. Fab

    Fab Well-Known Member Supporter

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    So cool! I only had an APRS rebound via MIR and I got the QSL card that I love.
    CW is so great, I made only 100 QSO in that mode but I was very proud because I studied by myself (I didn't need it in my license).

    I'm really passionate about air traffic and most of the time I listen to the radar, I love it.

    Do you have an account on Echolink? We could try to say hi (my english is poor...)
     
  17. Robert Kittine

    Robert Kittine Active Member

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    Were are you located FAB. I have Echo Link set up and I am also on D-Star.

    .--/. -.-./.-/-. .../.--./././-.- ../-. -.-./---/-.. .-/-./-.. ---/-./.-../-.-- .- ..-././.-- .--/../.-../.-.. -.-/-./---/-.

    --... / ...--Bob
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2020
  18. Fab

    Fab Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'm in Rome, Italy a very famous COVID Area! :D
    I can't translate those signs to me CW is music! :)
     
  19. LElliott

    LElliott Well-Known Member

    It's all Greek to me, except I know ya need a license for it.
     
  20. Fab

    Fab Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Then you can ask Danzig :)
     
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