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I feel a criminal will npt bother cuz he know im a wolf not a sheep. He will move on. Also when at my sons school there no BG prowling the elementry school parking lot! If i go to a gov build witch i cant remember the lastime i know this and gun stays in safe locked with alarm and dog and good nieghbors!!! And one guy said he goes to abc!? I dont drink!! You are paranoid!!
 

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Like I stated in a previous post. There are locations you can not carry. Like restaurants that serve alcohol, movie theaters. Abc stores etc.


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You can carry as long as you are in resturant part and not drinking and I dont drink! And there no robber prowling my son elementry school parking lot! That im 50ft away from my car!! And i have old nieghbors that look out for me and a alarm!! Im not living my life scared!!!
 

· Tommycourt1
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I am a lifetime member of the NRA and have been for 30 some years. The only markings I have on my Model A Pick-up is my company name Miracle Hauling: If we haul it consider it a miracle. It draws a lot of attention and smiles. However I do NOT advertise being an NRA member and carry my Mod. 26 completely concealed. I do though wear a Team Glock hat however so many in Az wear different types of hats to avoid sun exposure. I don't want to give the bad guy the impression I am armed. The element of surprise is an important ally and can give you the edge when you might need it. MY opinion only !
 

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Trust me you are less like to get attacked if a BG know he can move on to someone thats unarmed!!

Isnt that why you warn a agresser that your armed?? He doesnt think, ( O!! He armed! IM GONNA STEAL HIS GUN!!) Lol!!
 

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I am a lifetime member of the NRA and have been for 30 some years. The only markings I have on my Model A Pick-up is my company name Miracle Hauling: If we haul it consider it a miracle. It draws a lot of attention and smiles. However I do NOT advertise being an NRA member and carry my Mod. 26 completely concealed. I do though wear a Team Glock hat however so many in Az wear different types of hats to avoid sun exposure. I don't want to give the bad guy the impression I am armed. The element of surprise is an important ally and can give you the edge when you might need it. MY opinion only !

Thats sad you dont even have a sticker to let gun grabbers how many of us there are!!?? If we stayed quiet they will take our guns... smh
 

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Thats sad you dont even have a sticker to let gun grabbers how many of us there are!!?? If we stayed quiet they will take our guns... smh
Do you work with your local NRA-ILA office or other lobbying group? You're going to be much more effective in your state and local legislature than with just a sticker on your car.

I agree with you jefro36, I think a lot of people on here are just plain scared and care to much what others think. They have lost there freedom and don't even realize it.
Actually, the people on here who choose not to put stickers on their cars are most likely mitigating risk. They're not as shallow as you seem to think they are.

Having stickers on your car not only tells thieves that you're armed or have a gun in the car (so plusses and minuses there: can be advertising or deterrent), but it also gives ammunition to gun grabbers and feeds into the whole "obsessed lunatic" stereotype of a gun owner.

There's also some anecdotal evidence of people falsely accusing pro-2a bumper sticker holders with road rage/brandishing. Consider this scenario: You get stopped. You get ordered out of your car at gun point. You have your CCW on you and you're cuffed and detained. Turns out that some gun grabber saw your NRA sticker or your "CoExist" sticker (with the gun company logos) and decides to "get you good" after you accidentally cut them off. What happens then? It's your word against their's. YOU'RE the automatic bad guy in this situation because you have a gun and your vehicle matches the description of the vehicle in the original complaint call.

Please note: While I wouldn't put it past gun grabbers to do such a thing, I have NOT seen documentation of it actually happening.

Also consider this study from 2008. Interesting correlation between road rage and bumper stickers.

Bumper stickers reveal link to road rage
Car adornments betray a territorial mindset.

Matt Kaplan

bumper stickers
A blitz of bumper stickers could mean an assault for more than just your eyes.Visions of America, LLC / Alamy
Bumper stickers such as “Make Love, Not War” and “More Trees, Less Bush” speak volumes about a vehicle's driver — but maybe not in the way they might hope. People who customize their cars with stickers and other adornments are more prone to road rage than other people, according to researchers in Colorado.

The number of road rage incidents — bouts of aggressive driving such as speeding or tailgating, or confrontations with other motorists — has risen dramatically in recent years. In 1995 the American Automobile Association found 12,000 injuries and 200 deaths were linked to US road rage. In 2008, the numbers are estimated to exceed 25,000 injuries and 370 deaths, and many more road rage incidents, especially those that do not lead to injury, go unrecorded.

Psychologist William Szlemko and his colleagues at Colorado State University in Fort Collins wondered whether increasingly crowded roads might be contributing to rising tempers. The volume of vehicles on US roads has gone up by 35% since 1987, whereas the road network has swelled by only 1%.

In humans, as in many other species, overcrowding leads to increased territorial aggression, and the team suspected that this was what was happening on the roads.

What are you driving at?

Szlemko and his colleagues quizzed hundreds of volunteers about their cars and driving habits. Participants were asked to describe the value and condition of their cars, as well as whether they had personalized them in any way.

The researchers recorded whether people had added seat covers, bumper stickers, special paint jobs, stereos and even plastic dashboard toys. They also asked questions about how the participants responded to specific driving situations.

To keep the participants from realizing that the team was collecting information about aggressive driving, questions such as “If someone is driving slow in the fast lane, how angry does this make you?” were interspersed with decoy questions such as “What kind of music do you listen to in the car?”. Szlemko's team used a pre-existing scale called “Use of vehicle to express anger” to diagnose the presence of road rage in their participants.

People who had a larger number of personalized items on or in their car were 16% more likely to engage in road rage, the researchers report in the journal <i>Applied Social Psychology</i>1.

Territorial disputes

“The number of territory markers predicted road rage better than vehicle value, condition or any of the things that we normally associate with aggressive driving,” say Szlemko. What's more, only the number of bumper stickers, and not their content, predicted road rage — so "Jesus saves" may be just as worrying to fellow drivers as "Don't mess with Texas".

Szlemko admits that he is not entirely surprised by the results. “We have to remember that humans are animals too," he says. "It's unrealistic to believe that we should not be territorial.”

Precious little research has previously attempted to explore drivers' territorial feelings about their cars, says psychologist Graham Fraine at Queensland University's Transport Policy Office in Australia. “This work clearly demonstrates that people will actively defend a space or territory that they feel attached to and have personalized with markers,” Fraine says.

Szlemko suggests that this territoriality may encourage road rage because drivers are simultaneously in a private space (their car) and a public one (the road). “We think they are forgetting that the public road is not theirs, and are exhibiting territorial behaviour that normally would only be acceptable in personal space,” he says.

Although the finding will probably help psychologists to identify and potentially prevent road rage, the discovery may apply to other situations besides motoring. "I am curious to see if there is a correlation between marking other types of territories and other forms of aggressive behaviour," says psychologist William Wozniak of the University of Nebraska at Kearney.

Indeed, a brief glance around your office may reveal the most territorial individuals by the number of personalizing objects present on their desks.

References
Szlemko W., et al. J. Appl. Soc. Psychol. 38, 1664-1688 (2008). | Article |
Original study here: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/...ionid=EBFA64AB70F4FCE164E2713DA99EAF5F.f04t03

It's OK to wear your heart on your sleeve if you choose to, but it's hardly fair to make generalized statements about a population, in particular the members of this forum, that are untrue.

D
 

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Do you work with your local NRA-ILA office or other lobbying group? You're going to be much more effective in your state and local legislature than with just a sticker on your car.



Actually, the people on here who choose not to put stickers on their cars are most likely mitigating risk. They're not as shallow as you seem to think they are.

Having stickers on your car not only tells thieves that you're armed or have a gun in the car (so plusses and minuses there: can be advertising or deterrent), but it also gives ammunition to gun grabbers and feeds into the whole "obsessed lunatic" stereotype of a gun owner.

There's also some anecdotal evidence of people falsely accusing pro-2a bumper sticker holders with road rage/brandishing. Consider this scenario: You get stopped. You get ordered out of your car at gun point. You have your CCW on you and you're cuffed and detained. Turns out that some gun grabber saw your NRA sticker or your "CoExist" sticker (with the gun company logos) and decides to "get you good" after you accidentally cut them off. What happens then? It's your word against their's. YOU'RE the automatic bad guy in this situation because you have a gun and your vehicle matches the description of the vehicle in the original complaint call.

Please note: While I wouldn't put it past gun grabbers to do such a thing, I have NOT seen documentation of it actually happening.

Also consider this study from 2008. Interesting correlation between road rage and bumper stickers.



Original study here: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/...ionid=EBFA64AB70F4FCE164E2713DA99EAF5F.f04t03

It's OK to wear your heart on your sleeve if you choose to, but it's hardly fair to make generalized statements about a population, in particular the members of this forum, that are untrue.

D

Thank you very much for the time and thought spent on this response. Very much appreciated.


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Do you work with your local NRA-ILA office or other lobbying group? You're going to be much more effective in your state and local legislature than with just a sticker on your car.



Actually, the people on here who choose not to put stickers on their cars are most likely mitigating risk. They're not as shallow as you seem to think they are.

Having stickers on your car not only tells thieves that you're armed or have a gun in the car (so plusses and minuses there: can be advertising or deterrent), but it also gives ammunition to gun grabbers and feeds into the whole "obsessed lunatic" stereotype of a gun owner.

There's also some anecdotal evidence of people falsely accusing pro-2a bumper sticker holders with road rage/brandishing. Consider this scenario: You get stopped. You get ordered out of your car at gun point. You have your CCW on you and you're cuffed and detained. Turns out that some gun grabber saw your NRA sticker or your "CoExist" sticker (with the gun company logos) and decides to "get you good" after you accidentally cut them off. What happens then? It's your word against their's. YOU'RE the automatic bad guy in this situation because you have a gun and your vehicle matches the description of the vehicle in the original complaint call.

Please note: While I wouldn't put it past gun grabbers to do such a thing, I have NOT seen documentation of it actually happening.

Also consider this study from 2008. Interesting correlation between road rage and bumper stickers.



Original study here: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/...ionid=EBFA64AB70F4FCE164E2713DA99EAF5F.f04t03

It's OK to wear your heart on your sleeve if you choose to, but it's hardly fair to make generalized statements about a population, in particular the members of this forum, that are untrue.

D
BS!!! Sorry but BS

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BS!!! Sorry but BS

Sent from my LG-MS770 using Glock Forum mobile app
No apologies necc.

What exactly is BS? If you're going to call "BS", then at least state what is BS.

The fact that you're doing more good working the lobbying angle than just displaying a sticker on your car?

Or the generally agreed upon argument (by crime prevention prevention professionals around the US) that displaying certain stickers on your car make you a target for certain types of criminals?

Or are you calling BS on the study? Even though the study is old, it's a bit difficult to argue with peer reviewed studies.

Or are you calling BS on my assertion about this post:
I agree with you jefro36, I think a lot of people on here are just plain scared and care to much what others think. They have lost there freedom and don't even realize it.
being incorrect?

Grow some balls and represent what you like and are into!! In the South we have pride in what we Love!!
How much more effective do you think your stickers are when compared to how effective YOU could be working through your legislature and with your local leaders? My point is, YOU, the gun owner is going to be the "real" advertisement and YOU hold the true power, not just a sticker.

Yes, it's good to have all types and we can disagree on this one.

Oh and housekeeping performed on the thread.

D
 

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No apologies necc.

What exactly is BS? If you're going to call "BS", then at least state what is BS.

The fact that you're doing more good working the lobbying angle than just displaying a sticker on your car?

Or the generally agreed upon argument (by crime prevention prevention professionals around the US) that displaying certain stickers on your car make you a target for certain types of criminals?

Or are you calling BS on the study? Even though the study is old, it's a bit difficult to argue with peer reviewed studies.

Or are you calling BS on my assertion about this post:

being incorrect?



How much more effective do you think your stickers are when compared to how effective YOU could be working through your legislature and with your local leaders? My point is, YOU, the gun owner is going to be the "real" advertisement and YOU hold the true power, not just a sticker.

Yes, it's good to have all types and we can disagree on this one.

Oh and housekeeping performed on the thread.

D

Agreed!! And I do support the 2nd in everyway i can! I also work 40hrs a week and two children so hard to find time to lobby!! But u are correct. Sometimes typing comes out wrong or blunt and im sorry for that!!
 
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