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Not to me, but lots of documented cases of things catching striker triggers while holstering.
I carry appendix and nobody is perfect.
FIFY..it's happened to a LOT of handguns, that, when trigger pulled, it goes bang. NOT unique to Glock or any other striker gun. AND it's a 'negligent' discharge, not 'accidental' discharge..Accidental means it goes off w/o pulling the trigger.

Train..or have a holster that you have to take off to reholster..like the Raven Vanguard..'quick reholstering'?
Why is that a 'requirement'? For us non LEO people, why would you have to 'quickly' reholster??

If I am involved in a shooting, when it's all over, LEO called..when they show up I will be hands up, gun down..cuz when they first get there, they don't know who the BG is..
 

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In the past, I would have thought that is was a useless product, and by adding more moving parts to my gun, I would be creating a liability. After watching the guy next to me put a bullet through his thigh, I may have a different view.
The guy who shot himself appeared (to me at least) to be a younger, but decent responsible safe guy.
He had a bad moment, and is paying for it.
Perhaps the striker block isn’t such a bad idea.
 

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In the past, I would have thought that is was a useless product, and by adding more moving parts to my gun, I would be creating a liability. After watching the guy next to me put a bullet through his thigh, I may have a different view.
The guy who shot himself appeared (to me at least) to be a younger, but decent responsible safe guy.
He had a bad moment, and is paying for it.
Perhaps the striker block isn’t such a bad idea.
Not unique to strikers. 2 1911s and a revolver.

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?...FEB43BC6741A953A9C21FEB43BC6741A953&FORM=VIRE

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?...CBFE37909121B08F99FDCBFE37909121&&FORM=VDRVRV

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?...E74EA54AF72E810EDFD4E74EA54AF72E&&FORM=VRDGAR

What's that 'always assume the gun is loaded'..which number is that?
Pretty dumb to have a loaded gun in the gun case tho...
 

· Glockin’ since 1993
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Not unique to strikers. 2 1911s and a revolver.

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?...FEB43BC6741A953A9C21FEB43BC6741A953&FORM=VIRE

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?...CBFE37909121B08F99FDCBFE37909121&&FORM=VDRVRV

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?...E74EA54AF72E810EDFD4E74EA54AF72E&&FORM=VRDGAR

What's that 'always assume the gun is loaded'..which number is that?
Pretty dumb to have a loaded gun in the gun case tho...
I take the assume out of it. Whenever I introduce someone to firearms, in the safe or on the range, I stress All Guns Are Always Loaded until you check to find out otherwise.
 

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Just like there is nothing wrong safety wise with a Blackhawk Serpa holster doing a fast draw. Your finger hits the retention paddle. People that don't train, or don't train properly with it have a good chance of shooting themself in the foot or leg. Their finger drifts to the trigger immediately. So many accidents with that holster including LEO's who don't practice happened at multiple ranges. They got banned.

So the dingle berry from your wind breaker got in there? Then you didn't do your due diligence. Sell your Glock and buy a Taurus or S&W with a thumb safety. You got in a hurry and screwed up. "Glockleg" was bad training by cops who were transitioning from revolvers, and semi auto's with a thumb safety. I have some P model Rugers. Some have a safety which works bass ackwards of what is natural to me, or they have a decocker only. They are DA/SA. I don't use the thumb safety. I do on my Taurus, don't need to. My Shield doesn't have the thumb safety.

I don't think a beginning shooter should buy a Glock unless they are willing to train with an instructor to drill safety of the weapon into their thick little heads.

My first pistol was a 622 S&W. Thumb safety. I carried a gun all through my childhood! cap gun or whatever. Always had my finger on the trigger. I had to train to stop doing that when I got a Glock. I had a weak moment and thought about getting a thumb safety conversion kit for my 23. I was afraid of the gun. I had to train with an empty chamber drawing, and reholstering. Clint Eastwood, and John can flip their guns real fast into their holster. I will take my time and do it right.
 
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· Glockin’ since 1993
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Comes down to the training you received.
When I went through police academy 1993/94 they taught us to keep head up and eyes up. You don’t need to look down at your holster while holstering your gun. Hence the reason we had the 2 accidental discharged that I know of on the firing line.
Luckily no one was injured.
As far as I know training never changed on that other than instructors stressing that your holster needs to be free of any potential hazards like drawstrings, shirt tails or retention straps.

Funny thing is the deputy friend of mine that had his thumb break get caught in the trigger guard and gun discharge went from the Glock to carrying a 1911.
He was also given a LPG experimental police car that had some kind of gas regulator under the driver seat. He was leery of it and sure as anything it had a small explosion underneath him while driving. He wasn’t injured but refused to get back in an experimental police car.:eek::D
 

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Seems simple enough to not cause any problems, but since I don’t use a holster very often and don’t CC it’s not something I need. It also seems too simple to cost $80.00; they are a little too proud of it.
 

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I don't think a beginning shooter should buy a Glock unless they are willing to train with an instructor to drill safety of the weapon into their thick little heads.
AGREE, particularly those who have shot nothing but revolvers. People with hammer fired with safetys/decocker type stuff EMPHASIZE all the time about training to your gun, 'train to sweep that thing as you draw'...but when somebody gets a striker..no big emphasis on learning that gun..there sure should be...

Quote-"So much of everything comes down to training. A stock Glock will do the job. Beware of modifying your carry or duty weapon."

Agree also...take a perfectly reliable handgun, install all manner of triggers and other 'internals' and gee, now it malfunctions....yikes.
 

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I just don't see the utility of 'quick to reholster; holsters. Why is this even a consideration, to be able to quickly put your IWB gun away?


As a non LEO, don't see how this would apply..the threat is gone, disabled or I am gone, retreated..no need to 'reholster while keeping eyes on any threat', IMHO.
Some training schools for civilians are emphasizing the need to not get shot when the police arrive & see you holding a gun on suspect. The training is to reholster your gun before the police arrive, often quickly.

When I first heard of the SCD (on Lucky Gunner), I was leery, despite the very positive review. Then I bought a Glock 43X. Being used for several decades of using pistols with a manual safety, I thought, "This thing is really easy to fire, intentionally or otherwise. I need to double-up on my awareness & not count on a safety to protect me." I noted that Mas Ayoob strongly recommended the SCD on the GlockTalk forum, & published an article on it: .American Handgunner One More Safety Net: "The Gadget" - American Handgunner

With all my prior pistols, I carried AIWB without a concern, because the safety was always on except when ready to fire. I decided that carrying the 43X AIWB was too much of a risk, & a brief experiment confirmed that assessment: I was using my index finger to probe the trigger guard when holstering, to make sure that there were no clothes in the trigger guard. Really, really bad idea!

So, last week I converted & bought one, because I often carry IWB, which means that there is a chance of entangling the trigger in my shirt. It arrived on Monday. I tested it with dry fire to confirm that the SCD didn't interfere with normal functioning. Then I tested it to see if my thumb on the SCD could prevent the gun from firing when I aggressively pulled the trigger, & it could.
 
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