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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I recently purchased my first Glock. It's a new G35, Gen.4. I have several friends with Glocks and they advised me change out the sights right away. I decided to go with the AmeriGlo I-dot night sights. I am normally fairly proficient with a pistol, but for some reason with my Glock I was shooting way low. When I looked at the back of the package that the sights came in, I noticed that my model wasn't listed (I think the G34 or 36? was). Does anyone know if this is the source of my trouble?
 

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Welcome to the Glock Forum Evans1177 !!

I'll put this thread in the Gunsmithing sub forum,

where it belongs and get you an answer to your question quicker...
 

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There are two different sets of Ameriglo I-Dot night sights.
-One is for models 17, 19, 22, 23, 24, 26, 27, 33, 34, 35, 37, 38, 39.
-The other is for models 20, 21, 29, 30, 31, 32, 36.

The 2009 Glock Armorer's Manual lists the following rear sight heights, of course Ameriglo's I-Dot sights are different heights but this gives you an idea of which models share the same rear sight heights:

G17: 6.5mm
G17C: 6.5mm
G17L: 6.1mm
G19: 6.5mm
G19C: 6.5mm
G26: 6.5mm

G22: 6.5mm
G22C: 6.5mm
G23: 6.5mm
G23C: 6.5mm
G24: 6.5mm
G24C: 6.5mm
G27: 6.5mm
G35: 6.5mm

G20: 6.9mm
G20C: 6.9mm
G29: 6.9mm

G21: 6.9mm
G21C: 6.9mm
G30: 6.9mm
G36: 6.9mm

G37: 6.5mm
G38: 6.5mm
G39: 6.5mm

G31: 6.9mm
G31C: 6.9mm
G32: 6.9mm
G32C: 6.9mm
G33: 6.5mm

G25: 6.9mm
G28: 6.9mm

All Glock brand front sights are the same height.
 

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When you fire a pistol, the gun begins to recoil before the bullet leaves the barrel. The more powerful the gun and the shorter the barrel, the more the gun recoils before the bullet is clear of the barrel and on its way to the target. Put another way, short-barrled, hard kicking guns might shoot high. For this reason, the front sights on short-barrled, hard kicking guns (compact 45's, big-bore snubbies) are tall. Just look at them and you'll see. Conversely, a longer-barreled, lighter recoiling handgun like the Glock 35 might have a tendency to shoot low and benefit from a shorter front sight.

Now, this effect shouldn't be that pronounced if you put sights designed for a Glock 22 on a Glock 35 so I'd investigate further before filing down the top of the front sight.

What kind of sight picture are you using? Are you lining up the top of the front sight with the top of the rear sight? That's how you do it. The I-dot looks like a copy of Heinie's Straight 8 sights that have been around for years. Lining up the dots like a colon mark : is ok for windage (left and right) but horrible for elevation so don't so it that way. Focus on the front sight and line up the top of the front sight with the top of the rear sight and have equal amounts of space on either side of the front sight. Night sight dots are for quick and fast shooting in low light, not punching holes in paper. I've seen lots of trouble when folks start chasing those dots thinking they actually mean something.
 

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Im new here to the forum and I hate to start any problems on my first post, but WadeP's post about recoil has nothing to do point of impact. recoil happens after the bullet has left the gun, jerking or flinching happens during trigger pull. Glocks factory front sights are the same no matter what size, sub-compact, long slide and everything in between.

Im pretty sure theres only one Glock factory front sights and its .165 tall.

(From Glock)
GLOCK rear sights are available in four heights. The standard rear sight height for GLOCK pistols in 9x19, .40, .45 G.A.P., .357 and .380 calibers is 6.5mm (0.256in.); .45 and 10mm AUTO calibers 6.9mm (0.27in.).

Rear sights are also available in heights of 6.1mm (0.24in.), 6.9mm (0.27in.) and 7.3mm (0.29in.).

Every change of the rear sight height will result in a shift of the predicted position of approximately 50mm (1.97in.) over 25m (27yds.) firing distance.
Now Ameriglo and most other after market companies, uses the Standard Rear (.256) and has front sights in various heights. Ive seen .150 up to .350 and also there is a few different height rears also, like the super tall "Suppressor ready" sights.

Sight rule: Move rear sight in the direction you want the bullet to move. Move front sight the opposite direction you want the bullet to move.


Now, I also just picked up a Glock 35 and today using my trusty MGW sight pusher tool, I installed a set of Sevigny competition rear and a .215 tall x .115 wide plain serrated front. I have several different heights to test out because Im going to be getting a Fiber Optic front, and I heard I needed a taller front for the long slide so Im going to start out with the .215 to see if that is true.... When I shot again hopefull in the next day or so....I'll let you know if that is true or not. I'll will be shooting at 25 yards from a bench on sand bags, to see if the Point of Impact matches Point of Aim.

I also have a custom made sight on one of my 17L's Im gonna shoot on the sand bag to see where its at @ 25 yards.

Later,
 

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but WadeP's post about recoil has nothing to do point of impact. recoil happens after the bullet has left the gun,
This question has been debated ad nauseam on every gun forum out there. It's as sure to draw debate as which caliber is better.

I believe this is best explained by Newton's Third Law: To every action there is always an equal and opposite reaction. Recoil, the equal and opposite reaction to the combustion of powder, begins immediately when the burning powder begins to push against the base of the bullet.

Locked breech guns like the Glock and 1911 have the slide held in place by mechanical forces and the slide does not unlock until pressure subsides and the bullet leaves the barrel. However, recoil ever so slight but still enough to affect the bullet's trajectory, begins immediately.

In this slow-motion video of a 1911 firing, you can clearly see the gun recoil before the bullet leaves the muzzle.

[ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ltyEyNfdp8I[/ame]
 

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:rolleyes: I guess Wade is right..... he has video.


Back to the orginal post: Probly a sight picture problem.

I have a LEO who had problems after their dept switched from Glocks to M&Ps. When they failed to qualify, they came out to my house for some help. The new grip feel was enough of a distraction to make them forget about lining up the sights properly. After a few hours of slow fire and sight alignment drills, they were good to go.

Wade hit the nail on the head here:
I've seen lots of trouble when folks start chasing those dots thinking they actually mean something.
I have never shot Heinie straight8's or Ameriglos Idots. Always Trijicon 3dots. But Im fixing to install a fiber optic front with a plain black rear (Sevigny Competitions) on my new Glock 35. But first Im going to try shooting different height fronts to get it sighted in at 25 yards with a traditional center hold from sand bags and bench to make sure. Then Im going to try out the fiber optic and see if the bright red dot throws me off at 25yards.

I have several plain fronts to try out and I will shot the same factory ammo, 10 shots at 25 yards with each height from the bench on bags. I have two goals, #1 is to continue breaking in my new glock 35, and #2 I get to finally try out a fiber optic front with a plain rear sight. Fun if nothing else right? :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'm glad I asked. I'm getting a lot of info here. Hate to sound ignorant, but I haven't bought too many brand new guns (this is my first pistol). What do you mean by breaking in?
 

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Some people like to break there pistols in buy shooting it at least 500 rounds.

I know that some rifle barrel makers and high end custom builders break in barrels by shooting a number of rounds and totally cleaning the barrel then shooting a few more and clean again, repeat again and again and again...

Ive never "Broke a gun in" like that, #1 I dont have unlimited ammo to waste at the range....And #2 I dont have four or five thousand dollar custom pistols and rifles either.

But apparently, I dont know much either so.:eek:
 
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