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Hi my G45 locked partially open after fireing. Empty case is still in chamber and I can’t disassemble the gun. Trigger is not locked up, just is kind of stiff. If you could help that would be great. Pictures below.
 

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Legitimate Combatant
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Welcome to the Forum!

I would remove the slide plate and all the slide's smaller internal parts.
Insert a wooden dowel in the barrel and try to work it free.

Is there more of a story to this? Ammo, reloads, parts been swapped lately?
 

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Hi my G45 locked partially open after fireing. Empty case is still in chamber and I can’t disassemble the gun. Trigger is not locked up, just is kind of stiff. If you could help that would be great. Pictures below.
Welcome to the forum,if it was me I would force the slide open to extract the case.
If normal strength won't get it,you may need to use say a pice of wood that is thin enough to fit between the barrel and recoil spring assy on the front of the slide and give it a good smack, then clean and inspect to see what cased it.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I just looked at it again and I noticed that the guide rod and recoil spring are out infront of the slide (another picture below). As for ammo, I recently purchased this and have only put around 300 rounds of Remington 115g target ammo through it. The gun malfunctioned on the first round of a new kind of ammo I was trying. It is called sterling ammo and it is also 115g like the Remington.
 

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As the first post indicated, I’d suggest to remove the slide back plate, then remove the extractor plunger so the extractor is not trying to catch the round.

It looks like the round was out of spec or for some unknown reason got stuck and it’s not letting the recoil spring push the slide forward again.

Now, try to pull the barrel up without damaging it… if yes, you’ll be able to push the slide forward and separate it from the frame (because you removed the slide back plate)….

Once separated, push the barrel down until the round is not stuck anymore.

After that, check the ejector to ensure It’s not bent and the locking block and pins to verify nothing has been damaged after freeing the barrel and clearing the chamber.

Not likely but if the part doesn’t look good, replace it (using OEM parts!)

How a Glock works

 

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Happened with Winchester ammo on my brand new gen4 Glock 31 back in 2010. I just smacked the front of the gun into the floor to unlock it.
 

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Hi my G45 locked partially open after fireing. Empty case is still in chamber and I can’t disassemble the gun. Trigger is not locked up, just is kind of stiff. If you could help that would be great. Pictures below.
This does happen with fat out of spec ammo. Hold the slide in the left hand, pointing the pistol down and forward. With the right hand strike the rear of the grip with the web of your hand very sharply. This normally will allow the slide to go forward ejecting the case.
 

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Hi my G45 locked partially open after fireing. Empty case is still in chamber and I can’t disassemble the gun. Trigger is not locked up, just is kind of stiff. If you could help that would be great. Pictures below.
There could be several issues and you'll have to go through each one to figure which it is.


1st would be save yourself the headache of always worrying which parts you bought and buy:
a) A dremel (To file down anything that is not OEM to fit)
b) Snap caps (To test your Glock before ever getting to the range) and make sure it cycles properly.
c) Rubberized hammer (for applying force

Hammer the rear of the slide with the rubberized hammer (or a hammer with large rubber mat between to avoid breaking your firearm. Get it fully into battery. then pull the slide back to you with full force until the bullet leaves the barrel. If this doesn't work than you will need to remove the rear slide cover plate for disasembly on a slide that is refusing to remove.


The issue with everyone saying to always go OEM, that's unrealistic because 90% of the time you won't find OEM. Cycling the gun and seeing where the scuffs form, is much easier to file until it cycles smoothly.

Usually inability to get into battery as shown in the pictures usually results from one of the following places:

  • Recoil Spring channel too narrow: File the cylinder to be wider so the recoil spring cycles without issues.
  • Channeling between the barrel and ejection port: Filing the inner top of the slide, top of the barrel, and the circle opening at the end of slide will solve this.
  • Barrel bullet entry channel: Warning ONLY FILE IN THE DIRECTION THE BULLET FEEDS INTO THE BARREL. I reccomend doing this part without the dremel (to avoid F***ing up). This is least likely the problem but it happens, i'd fix this one as a last resort.
  • Lining on the slide where the casing slides in: The grooves are never en exact fit with non OEM, but it's easily fixed with a little use of the dremel and polishing.
  • Locking block: FIle the groves very lightly to polish any rough edges
  • Trigger mechanisim connector and ejector: If your slide lips back into battery when you fully depress the trigger than this is a place to look.
  • guide rod assembly slip: (most likely your case) this is where the guide rod slips into the second groove on the barrel when assembled. This can mean one of two things:
    • Your guide rod assembly is worn out (less likely) which would cause it to sliip out of place.
    • Your barrel under groove for the guide rod is too smooth (which mean its worn out). You can either:
      • file it inward for a flush guided slot with the dremel (so it stops slipping out of place) (recommended)
      • Buy a new one with less milage (you'll still have to dremel the portions that contact the slide to gurantee no issues)

Most Common Reasons:
  • unpolished/filed trigger bar: most trigger bars non OEM come with a s*** ton of rough edges that distrupt cycling. Pull out the entire trigger bar and file every corner to it until every edge is soft and rounded.
  • Firing Pin Saftey: Till this day i have never seen one that matches OEM out of the box. A nice trick is getting a power drill inserting the Firing pin saftey (as if it is a drill bit), then pressing a file against it while powering the drill until it is softened enough. Doing this gurantees an even polish all around it as if it came from the factory.
  • Extractor: I saved this one for last because it has been the most common one iv'e seen to cause battery failures. the inner porting that interacts with casings always causes lock-ups with people always coming to me scratching their heads not being able to figure it out. If you have a oem one for comparison for filing it helps, but if not that's where those snap caps will come in handy with trial and error without anything going south when loaded.
I also reccomend oiling your firearm more if you want less problems to arise over time. Your guide rod probably caused more friction wearing out the guide rod lining. From the pictures it shows that firearm wasn't oiled for over a week. If your wife doesn't operate dry, then your firearm won't either.

Doing the above will make your glock just as good as (if not better) than oem in regards to cycling.

Experience: Too many gray hairs
 

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OP, do not file anything! It's nothing more than an ammo issue, fat case, even happens with factory new. Pull off the inspection plate, firing pin and depressor plunger and the slide will come off.
 

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There could be several issues and you'll have to go through each one to figure which it is.


1st would be save yourself the headache of always worrying which parts you bought and buy:
a) A dremel (To file down anything that is not OEM to fit)
b) Snap caps (To test your Glock before ever getting to the range) and make sure it cycles properly.
c) Rubberized hammer (for applying force

Hammer the rear of the slide with the rubberized hammer (or a hammer with large rubber mat between to avoid breaking your firearm. Get it fully into battery. then pull the slide back to you with full force until the bullet leaves the barrel. If this doesn't work than you will need to remove the rear slide cover plate for disasembly on a slide that is refusing to remove.


The issue with everyone saying to always go OEM, that's unrealistic because 90% of the time you won't find OEM. Cycling the gun and seeing where the scuffs form, is much easier to file until it cycles smoothly.

Usually inability to get into battery as shown in the pictures usually results from one of the following places:

  • Recoil Spring channel too narrow: File the cylinder to be wider so the recoil spring cycles without issues.
  • Channeling between the barrel and ejection port: Filing the inner top of the slide, top of the barrel, and the circle opening at the end of slide will solve this.
  • Barrel bullet entry channel: Warning ONLY FILE IN THE DIRECTION THE BULLET FEEDS INTO THE BARREL. I reccomend doing this part without the dremel (to avoid F***ing up). This is least likely the problem but it happens, i'd fix this one as a last resort.
  • Lining on the slide where the casing slides in: The grooves are never en exact fit with non OEM, but it's easily fixed with a little use of the dremel and polishing.
  • Locking block: FIle the groves very lightly to polish any rough edges
  • Trigger mechanisim connector and ejector: If your slide lips back into battery when you fully depress the trigger than this is a place to look.
  • guide rod assembly slip: (most likely your case) this is where the guide rod slips into the second groove on the barrel when assembled. This can mean one of two things:
    • Your guide rod assembly is worn out (less likely) which would cause it to sliip out of place.
    • Your barrel under groove for the guide rod is too smooth (which mean its worn out). You can either:
      • file it inward for a flush guided slot with the dremel (so it stops slipping out of place) (recommended)
      • Buy a new one with less milage (you'll still have to dremel the portions that contact the slide to gurantee no issues)

Most Common Reasons:
  • unpolished/filed trigger bar: most trigger bars non OEM come with a s*** ton of rough edges that distrupt cycling. Pull out the entire trigger bar and file every corner to it until every edge is soft and rounded.
  • Firing Pin Saftey: Till this day i have never seen one that matches OEM out of the box. A nice trick is getting a power drill inserting the Firing pin saftey (as if it is a drill bit), then pressing a file against it while powering the drill until it is softened enough. Doing this gurantees an even polish all around it as if it came from the factory.
  • Extractor: I saved this one for last because it has been the most common one iv'e seen to cause battery failures. the inner porting that interacts with casings always causes lock-ups with people always coming to me scratching their heads not being able to figure it out. If you have a oem one for comparison for filing it helps, but if not that's where those snap caps will come in handy with trial and error without anything going south when loaded.
I also reccomend oiling your firearm more if you want less problems to arise over time. Your guide rod probably caused more friction wearing out the guide rod lining. From the pictures it shows that firearm wasn't oiled for over a week. If your wife doesn't operate dry, then your firearm won't either.

Doing the above will make your glock just as good as (if not better) than oem in regards to cycling.

Experience: Too many gray hairs
What!?
90% or better you can find stock glock parts and glocks run fine dry!

Absolutely none of that is necessary! Also for your 2nd post with no introduction might wanna leave out comments on people's wives out,bad taste there buddy!
 

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OP, do not file anything! It's nothing more than an ammo issue, fat case, even happens with factory new. Pull off the inspection plate, firing pin and depressor plunger and the slide will come off.
Ammo? Iv'e thrown everything in all my Glocks without issue with close to no failures to feed in 8 to 10 years. Even overseas in ****ty sand situations.

Plus what do you think the fat casings are doing when running through the firearm over time?
 

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What!?
90% or better you can find stock glock parts and glocks run fine dry!

Absolutely none of that is necessary! Also for your 2nd post with no introduction might wanna leave out comments on people's wives out,bad taste there buddy!
What a shame for your poor glocks.
Sure you can run them dry for some time, but then you get scenarios like this guys and then people swear they run fine dry. That might work for occasional weekend shooters.

Never said it was necessary, its a guideline to see al the potential areas of cause and fix.

Here's my intro for you:

I'm an a*h** that speaks his mind and has had many years using Glocks.
It seems to p*ss off some, while plenty prefer it.
 

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What a shame for your poor glocks.
Sure you can run them dry for some time, but then you get scenarios like this guys and then people swear they run fine dry. That might work for occasional weekend shooters.

Never said it was necessary, its a guideline to see al the potential areas of cause and fix.

Here's my intro for you:

I'm an a*h** that speaks his mind and has had many years using Glocks.
It seems to p*ss off some, while plenty prefer it.
Well 20yrs of experience overseas,Mexico, and South America I've learned glocks can take anything, but just because I can shoot 1 doesn't make me a gunsmith. Some of the guys on here shoot competition and shoot more rounds in a year than the rest of us probably shoot in 5yrs. They have seen it all and their advice is worth noting. If you were overseas in the sand you know running your glock dry or almost dry is the preferred method as to not collect sand and debris. I get you got 8-10yrs experience ,but if you've never had a bad round you don't shoot enuff. You're arguing with people here who have way more experience with glocks than you or I have and I don't think anyone here has ever done the things you speak of. Also worth noting assholes don't last long here.
 
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