Glock Firearms banner
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everybody! I'm new to this web site so I'm not sure if I'm asking this in the right area. Anyway I just bought a glock 43 and when I have the slide locked back all the way into place I can tilt the gun up and down and notice that the striker pin comes out a little and when I tilt it back it goes back in. Is this normal? Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
So with the smaller framed Glocks are you just able to see the striker pin exposed because the length of the overall gun is shorter? In my friend's Glock 19 I can't see the pin. Sorry for all the questions. I'm just trying to figure out the functionality of Glocks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
359 Posts
My 43 does it as well. You don't have to tilt the gun to see it; with the slide locked back, turn the gun over - you can move the firing pin freely back and forth. It does poke through the breech face like yours. I just checked my 26, and it too moves freely, but it doesn't come out the breech face.

Not sure why the difference, but it's different, slightly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you for the reply! I wonder why the 43 was designed to have the striker come out of the breech face?.... So if you can't see the striker come out of the breech face of your 26 how do you tell it's moving freely? Do you just hear it?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,847 Posts
So with the smaller framed Glocks are you just able to see the striker pin exposed because the length of the overall gun is shorter? In my friend's Glock 19 I can't see the pin. Sorry for all the questions. I'm just trying to figure out the functionality of Glocks.
You didn't read the entire thread I linked above. I explained it there.

Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
359 Posts
Thank you for the reply! I wonder why the 43 was designed to have the striker come out of the breech face?.... So if you can't see the striker come out of the breech face of your 26 how do you tell it's moving freely? Do you just hear it?
Lock the slide back and turn the gun upside down (magwell up). You can see the striker in the slide and move it back and forth; no tilting needed. That's how I confirmed it moves on the 26 but doesn't come out the front.

EDIT:

In this picture, the back of the striker (the part that catches on the "sear" (I don't think it's actually classified as a sear, but close enough - it's back end of the cruciform on the trigger bar and it releases the striker) can be seen. With your slide locked back, you can move this back and forth). The reason is on the 42 and 43, the striker safety plunger is depressed with the slide back. You may wish to go watch some youtube videos that dissect and explain the Glock mechanism, it's a thing of simplistic beauty (in my opinion).

Also, it goes without saying, but I'll say it anyway: make sure the gun is unloaded and no mag is inserted when doing any of this.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
359 Posts
You didn't read the entire thread I linked above. I explained it there.

Dave
Dave - question/observation...

I was wondering about the striker block difference when I got my 43. It threw me off because I'd only seen full-size glocks before, and my 26.

The 43 is just about as long as the 26, darn close anyway. If they can fit a "normal" Glock striker safety/striker configuration in the 26, they could probably fit one in the 43(?).

Seeing that thread on the 42 and your explanation, this now makes more sense: I'm thinking the 43 is an upsized 42 rather than the "cut in half lengthwise" 26 people make it out to be.

Is that your take on it as well? Thank you,

Yep
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,847 Posts
It may simply be more the result of the width of the slide being narrower on the 42 and 43 and not so much a length issue, though it could be a combination of both. And, I would agree that the 43 is a slightly larger version of a 42 as opposed to a cut down 26, as many of the design features are the same.

As a sidenote, we did discuss in advanced armorer school that Glock may be looking to incorporate the newer style of firing pin safety on future generations. I don't recall the exact reason...though I seem to recall it may simply have been found to be a more effective design with there being less wear to the safety and firing pin.

Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
359 Posts
As a sidenote, we did discuss in advanced armorer school that Glock may be looking to incorporate the newer style of firing pin safety on future generations. I don't recall the exact reason...though I seem to recall it may simply have been found to be a more effective design with there being less wear to the safety and firing pin.

Dave
Interesting info, thanks.

The main difference I see in the striker safety is the 42/43 safety is keyed and only goes in one way. The plunger on the 43 has a significantly larger diameter as well (I just did a side-by-side comparison).

Thanks for the reply.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
459 Posts
The Trigger Mechanism Housing on the 43 has a raised portion that's not on the double stack models (it's parallel to the portion that holds the ejector). I'm pretty sure it is compressing the firing pin safety when the slide is fully to the rear. This is allowing the 43 striker to move freely when the slide is all the way back while the double stack slides will block the striker from moving forward once it has moved behind the safety. Why they added this design, I have no idea.

As far as the length differences between the 26 and 43 - the barrels are the same length. The length difference is entirely in the back portion of the slide which is why the 43 has a shorter firing pin.

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,677 Posts
... I just bought a glock 43 and when I have the slide locked back all the way into place I can tilt the gun up and down and notice that the striker pin comes out a little and when I tilt it back it goes back in. Is this normal?
Yes.

In this picture, note that there are two rub marks on the firing pin safety.

The green arrow identifies the rub mark produced by the trigger bar firing pin safety cam (shown here) and is typical of all Glock pistols.

The red arrow identifies the rub mark produced by the trigger mechanism housing firing pin safety cam (shown here) and is currently unique to the G42 and G43.

When either cam noted above pushes (disengages) the firing pin safety, the firing pin is free to move through the breech face.

Best regards,

Bob :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,921 Posts
I didn't even ask the question but I'm glad I read the responses...Lot's of knowledgeable and inquisitive folks on this forum; that's why I like tuning in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Hello everybody! I'm new to this web site so I'm not sure if I'm asking this in the right area. Anyway I just bought a glock 43 and when I have the slide locked back all the way into place I can tilt the gun up and down and notice that the striker pin comes out a little and when I tilt it back it goes back in. Is this normal? Thanks
My g43x does the same thing
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top