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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My bf's glock issue:
Glock 23,gen 3.

While firing at the range, a round (a reload) fired, but failed to eject the spent round.
I manually pulled slide back and chambered the next round. The weapon failed to fire,
leaving no strike mark on the primer...I worked the action a second time,
and again the weapon failed to fire. I unloaded the weapon, and loaded
a (factory round) and again, it failed to fire with "no markings" on the primer.

Has anyone had the same issue with their Glock?

any help or suggestion's would be appreciated.

Thank you! :)
 

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sherbare32 said:
My bf's glock issue:
Glock 23,gen 3.

While firing at the range, a round (a reload) fired, but failed to eject the spent round.
I manually pulled slide back and chambered the next round. The weapon failed to fire,
leaving no strike mark on the primer...I worked the action a second time,
and again the weapon failed to fire. I unloaded the weapon, and loaded
a (factory round) and again, it failed to fire with "no markings" on the primer.

Has anyone had the same issue with their Glock?

any help or suggestion's would be appreciated.

Thank you! :)
How old is the gun and how many rounds have been shot thru it? I would say the gun would need a full disassembly and inspection. It's possible that the internals are so gunked up that it's causing a failure to fire. When the round failed to eject did a bullet go down the barrel? Some squib loads won't have enough powder to cycle the next round.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
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blackwolffcf : No, I did not take out the striker. Because I took it straight over and left it with a gunsmith.

chilly613: He bought it used, and is unsure of how many rounds have been fire, it was dirty when I purchased it. But since then, he has dissembled it and thoroughly cleaned it several times.

Yes, a round went down the barrel, but I do not believe it was a squib because there were powder markings around the mouth of the shell....

He is thinking there is a problem with either the firing pin or the spring...But not sure, dropped it off at the gunsmith, should know more in a few days.:confused:
 

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sherbare32 said:
blackwolffcf : No, I did not take out the striker. Because I took it straight over and left it with a gunsmith.

chilly613: He bought it used, and is unsure of how many rounds have been fire, it was dirty when I purchased it. But since then, he has dissembled it and thoroughly cleaned it several times.

Yes, a round went down the barrel, but I do not believe it was a squib because there were powder markings around the mouth of the shell....

He is thinking there is a problem with either the firing pin or the spring...But not sure, dropped it off at the gunsmith, should know more in a few days.:confused:
Well, good luck. Let us know what it is and maybe we can use the info with our Glocks.
 

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Gunsmith was a good move...not something that can be diagnosed over the internet.
 

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SHOOTER13 said:
Gunsmith was a good move...not something that can be diagnosed over the internet.
I second, possibly just too dirty, or it could be more serious. Unlike some other member on here... I believe shooter knows who... You are doing the wise thing!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hey everyone, My boyfriend got the results from the gunsmith:
Apparently it did indeed turn out to be a squib load and fortunately, the second round was unable to chamber preventing the second round from firing.
I "Dodged the bullet" this time" Lol, and learned several important things. First of all, with any malfunction...I will check the barrel to make sure that it
is obstruction free. Second, I intend to weigh everyone of my reloaded rounds to ensure they are of proper weight before firing.
Can anyone recommend a good scientific scale for measuring a finished, completed round.

Thanks for all the input, and my BF will soon be joining this forum as a member under his alter ego: whiskey tango.

:)
 

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I would consider it a waste of time to weigh every round…. but if you insist, just about any postal rated scale will do.
 

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If I still had the ammo that caused the squib, I would pull each and every bullet, and weigh each and every measure of powder.

I sure as hell would not used that same lot again, as it stands now. ( That's for sure ! )
 

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GrassHopper
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Just to explain for a moment…

I do not Reload, I just shoot. I would toss the lot and buy better ammo.

Shooter, on the other hand, reloads and has the time and expertise to correct the issue.
 

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Hey everyone, My boyfriend got the results from the gunsmith:
Apparently it did indeed turn out to be a squib load and fortunately, the second round was unable to chamber preventing the second round from firing.
I "Dodged the bullet" this time" Lol, and learned several important things. First of all, with any malfunction...I will check the barrel to make sure that it
is obstruction free. Second, I intend to weigh everyone of my reloaded rounds to ensure they are of proper weight before firing.
Can anyone recommend a good scientific scale for measuring a finished, completed round.

Thanks for all the input, and my BF will soon be joining this forum as a member under his alter ego: whiskey tango.

:)
YES, you dodged the bullet this time. I would not bother weighing the ammo. I would not purchase anymore either. Get rid of any that you have now and buy factory ammo.

Yes, you can have problems with factory too but the chances are a lot better in you favor that you won't. I'm not talking about factory reloads here either. Winchester makes a good brand of ammo fairly cheap you can get at any Walmart. Glock will cover any damage done (warranty) by factory ammo if necessary.
 
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