Glock 17 Guidance please - Qs with pics, recoil spring snagging?

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by Ogre, Feb 12, 2012.

  1. Ogre

    Ogre New Member

    So I'm a Glock newb. Just purchased a used Glock 17 2nd gen. It has LE/GOVT restricted mags and so I'm told is or may be a retired police issue. Other than that I don't know much else. When I perform the procedure to remove the slide from the frame I begin to move the slide forward and I'm hearing a distinct clicking sound and notice a slight movement in the trigger along with the sound.

    At first I thought it is the trigger bar ramp that pushes down the firing pin safety making the sound and that it is due to getting hung up on it.

    However, when looking down the mag well I now think the guide rod and recoil spring are getting snagged on some part of the frame. I seat the guide rod every time I practice disassembly but it seems to always pop out of the recess onto the step above the recess on the barrel. So I think it's the spring getting snagged on the slide lock lever and the movement I saw was just the interaction of the trigger bar and the firing pin safety.

    This common? Uncommon? This going to be an issue? The spring and the rod look in good condition. Fix?

    Another issue is the ramp for the trigger bar. It appears worn. It doesn't seem to be non functional, but I wonder how long it will last. Should I replace it?
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Next thing would be appears to be a small sliver of metal missing from the ridge inside the slide around the chamber area. Hot load? Malfunction? Issues?

    [​IMG]

    Last thing is that I noticed that toward the end of the slide it appears that part of the slide is higher than the other. It looks like a result of manufacturing. Is that supposed to be there?

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Boracay

    Boracay ʎ ɐ ɔ ɐ ᴚ o


    When I perform the procedure to remove the slide from the frame I begin to move the slide forward and I'm hearing a distinct clicking sound and notice a slight movement in the trigger along with the sound. -- THE CONNECTOR RESETS THUS CREATING A CLICKING SOUND.


    I seat the guide rod every time I practice disassembly but it seems to always pop out of the recess onto the step above the recess on the barrel. -- NORMAL FOR CAPTIVE GUIDE ROD-SPRING ASSEMBLY TO POP OUT.


    So I think it's the spring getting snagged on the slide lock lever and the movement I saw was just the interaction of the trigger bar and the firing pin safety. -- THE SPRING DOESN'T REACH THE SLIDE LOCK. ONLY THE REAR PLASTIC TIP OF THE GUIDE ROD TOUCHES THE SLIDE LOCK.


    Another issue is the ramp for the trigger bar. It appears worn. It doesn't seem to be non functional, but I wonder how long it will last. Should I replace it? -- NO NEED TO REPLACE. IT WILL OUTLAST YOUR GLOCK. IF THE WORN BOTHERS YOU, JUST BUFF IT WITH DREMEL.


    Next thing would be appears to be a small sliver of metal missing from the ridge inside the slide around the chamber area. Hot load? Malfunction? Issues? -- NORMAL FRICTION WEAR CAUSE BY MOVEMENT OF SLIDE & BARREL DURING EVERY CYCLE.



    Last thing is that I noticed that toward the end of the slide it appears that part of the slide is higher than the other. It looks like a result of manufacturing. Is that supposed to be there? -- ITS PART OF THE SLIDE THAT RESETS THE CONNECTOR EVERY CYCLE.


    SUMMARY:

    YOU HAVE A NORMAL WORKING GUN.
     

  3. Ogre

    Ogre New Member

    Awesome. Can't wake up to better news than that.
     
  4. voyager4520

    voyager4520 New Member

    Every one of those things is normal for Glocks. Just make sure that each time you reassemble from field strip, the base of the guide rod is fully seated in the crescent-shaped notch in the barrel lug, even if you didn't take the guide rod and barrel out of the slide.
     
  5. Ogre

    Ogre New Member

    Thanks for the info. I wasn't sure, every time I viewed someone disassembling one it happened in a flash and I never picked up on the sound. When I tried it I noticed it. Thanks again.
     
  6. G-23

    G-23 Premium Member

    You need a new trigger bar ASAP. It appears from the photo someone tried to lighten the pull on the trigger by filing the vertical extention down.

    I noticed you have the slide cover plate off. Why?
    I wonder if the slide lock is installed correctly?
    I couldn't quite follow the question but I think you are asking about the wear on eitherside of the slide where the locking block and slide come together (Bump) during the actual firing of the gun. The frame flexs and these two parts hit, foreward of the breech face, perfectly normal.

    The best answer I can give you is to have a certified Glock Armorer inspect your firearm.
     
  7. jimmyalbrecht

    jimmyalbrecht Glockn Rollin

    I love how on all these posts, someone says "it's fine dude, just keep shooting". Then the Glock Armorer comes in here and sets them all straight lol.
     
  8. Ogre

    Ogre New Member

    Ya know.

    Noticed some grime around it so I removed it to clean it.

    Ok, good to know. Thats what I was feeling.
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2012
  9. Ogre

    Ogre New Member

    Trigger bar shopping here I go...
     
  10. voyager4520

    voyager4520 New Member

    I don't see anything wrong with the firing pin safety cam arm of the trigger bar, the one in my Gen3 G23 (2004) looks exactly like that. The one in my Gen3 G27 (2009) looks more squared off, it doesn't come to such a fine point.

    It looks like it's just an older trigger bar to me, which you'd expect to see in a Gen2.
     
  11. Boracay

    Boracay ʎ ɐ ɔ ɐ ᴚ o

    Test by dry-firing. As long as it releases the firing pin safety, its good. The only mechanism it does is pushing the firing safety up.

    But if it really bothers you, buff it or change the whole thing. It will just cost you under $15.

    Noted.


    I don't have a sig " Certified Glock Armorer" but it doesn't mean i know nothing.
     
  12. G-23

    G-23 Premium Member

    -THE CONNECTOR RESETS THUS CREATING A CLICKING SOUND.
    This should not be happening.

    -NORMAL FOR CAPTIVE GUIDE ROD-SPRING ASSEMBLY TO POP OUT.
    A replacement recoil spring assembly should fix that.

    -NO NEED TO REPLACE. IT (trigger bar) WILL OUTLAST YOUR GLOCK. IF THE WORN BOTHERS YOU, JUST BUFF IT WITH DREMEL.
    Upgrades do take place during the life of a gun. Normal wear and tear have to be considered in construction of parts too. It appears that your trigger bar (vertical extention) has been tampered with in an attempt to reduce trigger pull. I would recommend a new bar.

    I would never tell a new firearm owner that comes to any site to "buff it out with a dremel." Even experienced gun owners can and do, over do this in an attempt to trick out their guns.

    -- NORMAL FRICTION WEAR CAUSE BY MOVEMENT OF SLIDE & BARREL DURING EVERY CYCLE.
    This is called, "Peening" and occurrs in all Glocks. Caused be the locking block hitting the slide during the flexing of the frame.

    "Last thing is that I noticed that toward the end of the slide it appears that part of the slide is higher than the other. It looks like a result of manufacturing. Is that supposed to be there?"

    I didn't reply to this because I wasn't sure just what you are referring too. Front or read end? Top, bottom or, underside?

    YOU HAVE A NORMAL WORKING GUN

    I could not disagree more
     
  13. G-23

    G-23 Premium Member

    When telling someone to "test" a firearm it might be helpful to explain "How to test" it especially when it comes to incorporated safety devices.
    Dry firing a Glock may or may not determine if the systems are operating as intended. And the person doing the test, has to "know " first how the individual systems work and what results from the dry firing indicate success or failure of the test.

    Care to do that?
     
  14. Boracay

    Boracay ʎ ɐ ɔ ɐ ᴚ o

  15. jimmyalbrecht

    jimmyalbrecht Glockn Rollin

    Nope, but I would trust a Glock Armorer's advice over yours when there is conflicting information :)
     
  16. Ogre

    Ogre New Member



    Made a short video showing a close up of dry firing, removing the slide and showing some of the points of concern I have. Hopefully this will be of some help. Thanks, I appreciate the assistance. Sorry for my dull monotone, I made it this morning pre-coffee.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 6, 2017
  17. voyager4520

    voyager4520 New Member

    The base of the guide rod being slightly out of position upon field strip is normal. When the gun is fully assembled, the base of the guide rod doesn't even touch the barrel, it seats against the frame just forward of the slide lock. When you field strip the gun, the base of the guide rod loosely finds its way back onto the barrel. The base of the guide rod should be manually seated into the crescent-shaped notch in the barrel lug every time the gun is reassembled.

    The line you see on the bottom of the slide is normal, it's part of the design.

    The "click" when you field strip sounds like the connector is bent too far outward, and when the slide goes forward the connector snaps outward. On the following page are instructions on how to measure and adjust the connector's bend angle, scroll down to where it says "SECTION II: INSTALLATION ROCKET & TACTICAL", then scroll down to where it says "Note:"
    http://www.ghostinc.com/category/istallationinstructions/

    If you've never detail stripped, here's a video showing how, all you need is a 3/32 inch punch like the Glock Armorer's Tool. Older trigger housings didn't have a rounded hole opposite of the connector to push the connector out of the trigger housing, so you may also need a thin flat-head screwdriver to push/pry the connector out of the trigger housing. The Glock he uses in the video has a locking block pin, yours doesn't, so just skip the parts with the locking block pin.
    [ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oV0wDDFV0NY[/ame]

    Another thing that may be causing the click is an NY trigger spring. Standard Glock trigger springs are a coil spring that attaches to the rear of the trigger housing and pulls the trigger bar up and to the rear. An NY trigger spring is a compression spring housed inside of another plastic housing which pushes straight up on the trigger bar cruciform. You can look at the following picture and compare to your Glock to see which trigger spring you have, the one on the left is a standard coil trigger spring, the one on the right is an Olive Drab colored NY trigger spring. Early Glock NY trigger springs were colored black, and there's an Orange version as well.
    [​IMG]

    If you have an NY trigger spring, the click is normal.
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2012
  18. Ogre

    Ogre New Member

    Ok, did a strip down and did a up close examination of the parts including that "paper test" between the trigger connector and housing. Looks like the trigger connector is going to be replaced along with the trigger bar.

    [​IMG]
     
  19. voyager4520

    voyager4520 New Member

    I've never seen that before, it's almost like the connector wasn't made properly.

    You might as well replace the trigger spring while you're at it, and seeing as you bought it used I'd give it a full detail strip cleaning. I'd look at the firing pin safety and make sure the spring is fully seated into it, the spring should be pushed into the firing pin safety until the spring 'clicks' into place. If the spring isn't installed properly, it can come out of the firing pin safety and turn sideways in the channel, the gun will usually still work but the trigger bar may get stuck on it at certain points which can lead to dangerous malfunction.
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2012
  20. G-23

    G-23 Premium Member

    Looks like a tool mark to me but photos can change stuff. That part of the connector only directs the triggerbar downward and there is not enough pressure from the bar to cause the connector to crack or break there.