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When I first started shooting handguns, one of the ‘rules’ is to keep your finger off the trigger until you have obtained the proper sight picture and are ready to shoot. Indeed, most say to keep finger outside the trigger guard. Watching Larry Vickers the other day, I noticed that he suggests the shooter take up the slack in the trigger, up to the break, during the presentation of the pistol. You should always practice the way you would actually shoot, and this certainly contradicts things. If placing your finger on trigger before ready to shoot is a golden rule, are anybody guilty of violating this rule?
 

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When I first started shooting handguns, one of the ‘rules’ is to keep your finger off the trigger until you have obtained the proper sight picture and are ready to shoot. Indeed, most say to keep finger outside the trigger guard. Watching Larry Vickers the other day, I noticed that he suggests the shooter take up the slack in the trigger, up to the break, during the presentation of the pistol. You should always practice the way you would actually shoot, and this certainly contradicts things. If placing your finger on trigger before ready to shoot is a golden rule, are anybody guilty of violating this rule?
If I pull my gun, it’s not to intimidate. So I can see his logic, but most of us are civilians. I’d think keeping your finger off the trigger until your target is probably safer in a civilian self defense situation. I could be in the minority though.
 

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I always keep my finger out of the trigger guard until target is acquired and ready to shoot.
 

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Watched Jerry Miculek revolver shooting video many years ago. He said he’s stacking the trigger while transitioning through targets.
My view is 1, that’s competition shooting for speed and accuracy and 2, he’s what we’d call a professional shooter.;)

I’ll do the usual, keep my finger out of the trigger guard till I’m ready to fire.
 

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I’ve noticed when dry firing, which I do a lot of lately, I’m stacking the trigger upon drawing and presenting gun to target. However, at the range I do the opposite. I’ve got to reverse course because I know in a real life situation, just having that last three pounds of squeezing will most likely cause me to shoot to early or worse, cause me to shoot when I might not have to. Definitely something I have to stop.
 

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Not a chance.I know seconds can count but if faced with a real life deadly threat I cannot believe my finger would be out of the trigger guard long enough to matter.I don't believe the benefits outweigh the risks.would I have a different answer if I carried with a Manuel safety on safe and or a empty chamber,can't say.
 

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Not a chance.I know seconds can count but if faced with a real life deadly threat I cannot believe my finger would be out of the trigger guard long enough to matter.I don't believe the benefits outweigh the risks.would I have a different answer if I carried with a Manuel safety on safe and or a empty chamber,can't say.
Your a LEO though?
 

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When I first started shooting handguns, one of the ‘rules’ is to keep your finger off the trigger until you have obtained the proper sight picture and are ready to shoot. Indeed, most say to keep finger outside the trigger guard. Watching Larry Vickers the other day, I noticed that he suggests the shooter take up the slack in the trigger, up to the break, during the presentation of the pistol. You should always practice the way you would actually shoot, and this certainly contradicts things. If placing your finger on trigger before ready to shoot is a golden rule, are anybody guilty of violating this rule?
The "presentation" of the pistol the pistol is already on target but still moving into position for eye to sight alignment. Essentially point shooting. The pistol is on target. It is safe to prep the trigger.
 

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The "presentation" of the pistol the pistol is already on target but still moving into position for eye to sight alignment. Essentially point shooting. The pistol is on target. It is safe to prep the trigger.
Makes sense.
 

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I'm of the old school where the phrasing was as you say, 'finger off the trigger until you have the sight picture...', etc. Then a couple years ago I heard someone put it one time a slightly different way - 'finger off the trigger until the decision has been made to shoot'. Maybe that's the deciding difference for some.

For me, it's almost a non-issue, because I'm not really fast enough for it to make all that much difference regardless.
 

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The "presentation" of the pistol the pistol is already on target but still moving into position for eye to sight alignment. Essentially point shooting. The pistol is on target. It is safe to prep the trigger.
Exactly. I have spent $4000 ish on defensive pistol training from multiple locations in the last 6 years.Your finger may be in the trigger guard when presenting to a life threatening person. On the trigger as soon as soon you have sight alignment (sight picture should instantly follow). At least that is the way I have been taught and how I practice.
 

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What John in AR said is your best bet. What caused you to know it was time to draw? Your senses/awareness caused you to sense danger. As you draw, you still be determining if shooting is necessary/required. If you decide you need to fire as your firearm is coming on target, that's when your finger should go to the trigger. If you decide just to challenge the threat your finger should be off the trigger. The adrenalin your system will be pushing out causes you to lose fine motor skills. You may not recognize how much pressure you are putting on the trigger in that moment and cause a negligent discharge.
 

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If you stay active in shooting sports, you’ll see procedures and techniques change constantly. Find what you’re comfortable with and practice it.

When I started shooting, the weaver stance was popular. Later on competition shooters were extending the weak hand fore finger to the front of the trigger guards and gun designers started squaring and checkering the trigger guards. Before I retired, the isosceles stance with the 60/40 grip was being taught.

Evolution of shooting pistols.

Many years ago I was an officer in a small town and carried a Browning Hi-Power. I had an encounter with a suspect and had my finger on the trigger while giving commands for the suspect.

It suddenly flashed in my mind that it would only take a few pounds of pressure for the pistol to fire or if I were bumped or attacked it would accidentally discharge.

The next day I switched to a S&W 645. A SA/DA pistol with a de-cocker and I felt much safer in doing my job.
 
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